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By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
Are lawyers running the country into the ground?Not guilty! says the Maryland State Bar Association, which is sending out a fact sheet to dispute Bush administration figures that suggest lawyers and their lawsuits are the root of many evils.According to President Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle, the United States has 70 percent of the world's lawyers despite having only about 5 percent of its population.Objection! says the state bar association.The fact sheet uses estimates from University of Wisconsin Professor Marc Galanter, who says the country has 25 to 35 percent of the world's lawyers.
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By Jim Kennedyjkennedy@theaegis.com | June 21, 2012
Father and son, Fred and Brian Twigg, of Bel Air, would have had a memorable day fishing the Susquehanna on June 9, even without the catch that left the two bass anglers puzzled. In addition to the eight nice white perch they kept to eat and the three smallmouth bass they released to provide sport another day, they also boated a toothsome oddity more typically found in saltier water, an Atlantic needlefish. The creature, which struck a deep-running silver crank bait in about 12 feet of water off the northern end of Port Deposit near the former Townsend's Marina, was more than two feet long, 28 inches to be exact, though its garden-hose shaped body gave it only slightly more heft than a large white perch.
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NEWS
April 26, 1992
Homeowners can reduce weeds, insect and disease damage by 50 to 80 percent -- while cutting chemical use -- by choosing the appropriate variety of grass seed and mowing at the correct height, according to anew publication produced by the Cooperative Extension Service, Maryland Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources.Fact Sheet 637, "Effective Lawn Care With Reduced Pesticide and Fertilizer Use," provides specific, concrete information that people can use to grow a thick and uniform lawn using few or no pesticides and moderate amounts of fertilizer.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | August 22, 2006
An Annapolis developer is proposing a $175 million residential, retail, office and hotel complex on the parking lot of the Savage MARC train station along the Howard-Anne Arundel county line - just the kind of dense development local officials want to see in the U.S. 1 corridor. The plan, proposed by Petrie Ross Ventures, would serve local and regional goals for providing more living and working spaces near Fort Meade and the National Security Agency as federal base realignments bring thousands of new jobs to the region in coming years.
NEWS
By TRB | September 10, 1992
''Clinton's strategy would cause 2.6 million jobs to be lost.''Washington. -- This assertion, which originated in a Bush-Quayle press release August 10, has become a campaign-trail bromide. It has the grand size and gleaming specificity we've come to expect in Bush statistics. Also the flagrant dishonesty.Governor Clinton's economic plan is far from perfect, though it is preferable to President Bush's plans, or lack thereof. But the issue here is not jobs. The issue, as with other Bush statistical claims, is the one he himself has chosen to emphasize: trust.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
CLARIFICATION An article in some editions of yesterday's Sun should have made clear that Cockeysville Middle School parent Barbara Franke opposes her school's temporary shared-building arrangement with the Rosedale Center, an alternative school in Baltimore County. Her statement, "I'm glad they did this," refers to the middle school's release of more specific information about the behavioral problems that led to student placements in Rosedale. Cockeysville Middle School officials sent a fact sheet about the Rosedale Center program home to the parents of each of the school's 800-plus students yesterday, providing for the first time details about the behavioral problems that landed middle and high schoolers in Rosedale's alternative program.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Citing a report showing that children fare worse in Baltimore than elsewhere in Maryland, a new coalition yesterday asked city candidates for mayor and City Council to make the welfare of children a key campaign issue this year."
NEWS
April 14, 1991
Here is a list of publications which contain information about housing for seniors:The Continuing Care Retirement Community: A Guidebook for Consumers. Published by the American Association of Homes for the Aging. Send a self-addressed stamped envelope for a catalog to: AAHA, 901 E Street NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20004. $4 plus shipping and handling. Literature also available.Housing Options for Older Americans (D12063), and the Continuing Care Retirement Communities Fact Sheet (D12181)
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN and CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN,NEWSDAY | November 30, 2005
I recently took a business trip and drove more than 800 miles. I heard that the Internal Revenue Service mileage reimbursement rate had increased, but when I submitted my expense report I was told the company wouldn't adopt the new rate until January. I assumed that the company had to automatically readjust its rate. Can you clear this up for me? For starters, companies don't have to adopt the IRS' standard mileage rate. If your company reimburses you for mileage at the current rate, which the price of gas has pushed up to 48.5 cents a mile - from 40.5 cents - for the final four months of 2005, then the IRS considers you to be reimbursed for mileage.
EXPLORE
By Jim Kennedyjkennedy@theaegis.com | June 21, 2012
Father and son, Fred and Brian Twigg, of Bel Air, would have had a memorable day fishing the Susquehanna on June 9, even without the catch that left the two bass anglers puzzled. In addition to the eight nice white perch they kept to eat and the three smallmouth bass they released to provide sport another day, they also boated a toothsome oddity more typically found in saltier water, an Atlantic needlefish. The creature, which struck a deep-running silver crank bait in about 12 feet of water off the northern end of Port Deposit near the former Townsend's Marina, was more than two feet long, 28 inches to be exact, though its garden-hose shaped body gave it only slightly more heft than a large white perch.
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN and CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN,NEWSDAY | November 30, 2005
I recently took a business trip and drove more than 800 miles. I heard that the Internal Revenue Service mileage reimbursement rate had increased, but when I submitted my expense report I was told the company wouldn't adopt the new rate until January. I assumed that the company had to automatically readjust its rate. Can you clear this up for me? For starters, companies don't have to adopt the IRS' standard mileage rate. If your company reimburses you for mileage at the current rate, which the price of gas has pushed up to 48.5 cents a mile - from 40.5 cents - for the final four months of 2005, then the IRS considers you to be reimbursed for mileage.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
CLARIFICATION An article in some editions of yesterday's Sun should have made clear that Cockeysville Middle School parent Barbara Franke opposes her school's temporary shared-building arrangement with the Rosedale Center, an alternative school in Baltimore County. Her statement, "I'm glad they did this," refers to the middle school's release of more specific information about the behavioral problems that led to student placements in Rosedale. Cockeysville Middle School officials sent a fact sheet about the Rosedale Center program home to the parents of each of the school's 800-plus students yesterday, providing for the first time details about the behavioral problems that landed middle and high schoolers in Rosedale's alternative program.
FEATURES
By Betsy Wade and Betsy Wade,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1998
For New Year, here's a harvest of free or inexpensive booklets for travelers.* "North Carolina Scenic Byways" contains 144 pages, and full-color photos present 44 roads that show off state history, culture and scenery. The book represents "heritage tourism," the highlighting of an area's history.In the Piedmont, for example, the 18-mile Indian Heritage Trail passes the state's oldest historical site, the Town Creek Indian Mound. The longest road, 173 miles through the coastal plain, is designated Lafayette's Tour: It touches several places the general visited in 1825.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Citing a report showing that children fare worse in Baltimore than elsewhere in Maryland, a new coalition yesterday asked city candidates for mayor and City Council to make the welfare of children a key campaign issue this year."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
Are lawyers running the country into the ground?Not guilty! says the Maryland State Bar Association, which is sending out a fact sheet to dispute Bush administration figures that suggest lawyers and their lawsuits are the root of many evils.According to President Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle, the United States has 70 percent of the world's lawyers despite having only about 5 percent of its population.Objection! says the state bar association.The fact sheet uses estimates from University of Wisconsin Professor Marc Galanter, who says the country has 25 to 35 percent of the world's lawyers.
NEWS
By TRB | September 10, 1992
''Clinton's strategy would cause 2.6 million jobs to be lost.''Washington. -- This assertion, which originated in a Bush-Quayle press release August 10, has become a campaign-trail bromide. It has the grand size and gleaming specificity we've come to expect in Bush statistics. Also the flagrant dishonesty.Governor Clinton's economic plan is far from perfect, though it is preferable to President Bush's plans, or lack thereof. But the issue here is not jobs. The issue, as with other Bush statistical claims, is the one he himself has chosen to emphasize: trust.
FEATURES
By Larry Millett and Larry Millett,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 11, 1992
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Dying may be the second oldest human activity, but that doesn't mean there isn't room for innovation when it comes to departing this vale of tears.In fact, a tour of the St. Paul Civic Center -- where the Minnesota Funeral Directors Association wrapped up a convention this week -- reveals some interesting novelties amid the usual displays of caskets, hearses, tombstones and other emblems of mortality.Take, for example, the "Peace Light," the latest wrinkle in post-mortem illumination.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | August 22, 2006
An Annapolis developer is proposing a $175 million residential, retail, office and hotel complex on the parking lot of the Savage MARC train station along the Howard-Anne Arundel county line - just the kind of dense development local officials want to see in the U.S. 1 corridor. The plan, proposed by Petrie Ross Ventures, would serve local and regional goals for providing more living and working spaces near Fort Meade and the National Security Agency as federal base realignments bring thousands of new jobs to the region in coming years.
FEATURES
By Larry Millett and Larry Millett,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 11, 1992
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Dying may be the second oldest human activity, but that doesn't mean there isn't room for innovation when it comes to departing this vale of tears.In fact, a tour of the St. Paul Civic Center -- where the Minnesota Funeral Directors Association wrapped up a convention this week -- reveals some interesting novelties amid the usual displays of caskets, hearses, tombstones and other emblems of mortality.Take, for example, the "Peace Light," the latest wrinkle in post-mortem illumination.
NEWS
April 26, 1992
Homeowners can reduce weeds, insect and disease damage by 50 to 80 percent -- while cutting chemical use -- by choosing the appropriate variety of grass seed and mowing at the correct height, according to anew publication produced by the Cooperative Extension Service, Maryland Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources.Fact Sheet 637, "Effective Lawn Care With Reduced Pesticide and Fertilizer Use," provides specific, concrete information that people can use to grow a thick and uniform lawn using few or no pesticides and moderate amounts of fertilizer.
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