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Facilities Ordinance

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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | October 17, 1990
County residents and developers may have to wait until next year to find out what rules will apply under a proposed adequate facilities ordinance being considered by the County Council.The ordinance, which requires developers to make sure roads, schools and water and sewer service can adequately service population increases brought on by new subdivisions, is expected to be enacted in some form Oct. 29.No one, not even developers, doubts that an adequate facilities law will become a reality someday soon -- the question is how and when.
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NEWS
April 10, 2014
Last week, the media finally reported that the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance in Howard County needs updating, and even then only because the two county executive candidates started talking about it ( "County executive candidates to revisit public facilities requirements," April 4). The media has ignored until now what others have long been talking about. The current ordinance can slow development if elementary schools and nearby street intersections are not ready to handle the increased load.
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NEWS
July 2, 2006
ISSUE: Annapolis officials have backed away from a consultant's plan to turn a busy junction on Bay Ridge Road into more of an urban center, noting a heated response from county residents who attended two public meetings. The consulting firm had recommended upgrading the area around Bay Ridge Road, Hillsmere Drive and Georgetown Road by redeveloping an aging plaza, acquiring homes for reuse and extending Georgetown Road. The plan called for turning Bay Ridge Road into a Main Street-style thoroughfare lined with shops, bike lanes, sidewalks and on-street parking.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun reporter | March 18, 2007
Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer is seeking to lift the building delay enacted last fall by the city council and to put off a public facilities bill - moves she said would streamline the planning process but that opponents say will thwart efforts to control growth. The adequate public facilities ordinance (APFO) would require that adequate fire, police, water and road support be in place before major new developments could move forward. The current development delay halted new projects until the legislation is put in place.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | January 10, 1995
The debate over Hampstead's adequate facilities ordinance continued last night as residents argued before the Board of Zoning Appeals that preliminary plans for the Westwood Park subdivision should not have been granted Aug. 29.Residents, represented by attorney Thomas J. Gisriel, said Hampstead's Planning and Zoning Commission should not have approved it because area schools and roads are approaching inadequacy.Hampstead's adequate facilities ordinance states that the commission may deny or delay a subdivision if any of the services required to support it -- such as fire protection or water -- are inadequate.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1995
The Hampstead Board of Zoning Appeals denied two appeals involving North Carroll Farms last night, leaving the project just as the town's Planning and Zoning Commission approved it in August.One appeal was from residents who oppose the development at the north end of town because, they say, local roads and schools already are crowded. The second was an appeal by developer Martin K. P. Hill, who wanted the 50-lot-per-year development limit lifted.The appeals board said no to both sides.But the three-member panel stopped short of making a statement on how the town's adequate facilities ordinance should be applied.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | December 30, 1993
If the Greater Severna Park Council has a new buzz word for 1994, it's "proactive."The trendy word is on everyone's lips, from retiring leaders to new officers describing the council's future.The council needs to reach out to draw the entire community into the council, says Ellen McGee-Keller, who has been nominated as the new president.The council hopes to become active in addressing the way the county's adequate facilities ordinance is applied, says Dan Nataf, chair of the public works committee.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
A long-awaited report evaluating the effectiveness of a 7-year-old law that ties development in Howard County to the construction of roads and schools is being held back a little longer.The Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance Committee -- with two of its 15 members absent because of vacations -- met last night in a conference room of the Columbia Gateway Building to approve a final draft of a list of recommendations for submission to County Executive James N. Robey.But debates over wording and new suggestions prompted some members to wonder aloud whether the committee should meet again.
NEWS
July 25, 2006
The Annapolis city council has imposed a one-year timeout for approving major new development until regulations can be approved to assure the small historic town can accommodate it. Critics variously complain the moratorium is too harsh, too weak, too politically motivated. That suggests the move is probably about right. Certainly, an ordinance requiring that adequate roads, parking, water and sewer service and other public facilities are in place before granting new building permits is long overdue.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1991
Rouse Co. says its proposal to expand Columbia by 89 acres would satisfy the requirements of the county's draft adequate facilities ordinance.The plan also includes a request to rezone another 175 acres for apartments, single-family homes and open space. Most of the annexation and rezoning would take place in the Village of Long Reach.Rouse asked the zoning board Wednesday for permission to add eight parcels totaling about 22 acres to the village. Most of the addition -- 17.2 acres -- would be used for offices and retail shops.
NEWS
July 25, 2006
The Annapolis city council has imposed a one-year timeout for approving major new development until regulations can be approved to assure the small historic town can accommodate it. Critics variously complain the moratorium is too harsh, too weak, too politically motivated. That suggests the move is probably about right. Certainly, an ordinance requiring that adequate roads, parking, water and sewer service and other public facilities are in place before granting new building permits is long overdue.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
ISSUE: Annapolis officials have backed away from a consultant's plan to turn a busy junction on Bay Ridge Road into more of an urban center, noting a heated response from county residents who attended two public meetings. The consulting firm had recommended upgrading the area around Bay Ridge Road, Hillsmere Drive and Georgetown Road by redeveloping an aging plaza, acquiring homes for reuse and extending Georgetown Road. The plan called for turning Bay Ridge Road into a Main Street-style thoroughfare lined with shops, bike lanes, sidewalks and on-street parking.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
Howard County's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance committee met last night to consider whether changes are needed to the regulation that attempts to ensure schools and roads are ready for population booms that come with new developments. APFO, passed in 1992, delays home building for a maximum of nearly four years in areas where crowding is projected in the elementary or middle schools. Developers must also pay for improvements to nearby roads that would not be able to handle extra houses.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
If Howard's 11 state legislators vote as expected Wednesday to reject a plan to raise $215 million for needed school construction through a real estate transfer tax increase, the county will be facing a challenging new reality. Among the looming possibilities: Increases in property and/or income taxes. A long-term freeze on new development. Significant cuts in capital spending on highways, parks and long-delayed public facilities. Classroom crowding that could endanger Howard's reputation for educational excellence.
NEWS
July 25, 1999
Hard not to be cynical about facilities lawEdward Lee's article "Panels to seek public's advice" (June 8) raised my blood pressure. It wasn't the reporter's words that caused my blood pressure to rise, but the comments of some of the people quoted.That article stated that only 14 residents spoke at a hearing on the Howard County Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance (APFO) June 7.A previous article quoted a county official as saying, "They're expecting the government to keep an eye on development so they don't have to invest their Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights" ("Panels to seek public's advice," July 5)
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
A long-awaited report evaluating the effectiveness of a 7-year-old law that ties development in Howard County to the construction of roads and schools is being held back a little longer.The Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance Committee -- with two of its 15 members absent because of vacations -- met last night in a conference room of the Columbia Gateway Building to approve a final draft of a list of recommendations for submission to County Executive James N. Robey.But debates over wording and new suggestions prompted some members to wonder aloud whether the committee should meet again.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun reporter | March 18, 2007
Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer is seeking to lift the building delay enacted last fall by the city council and to put off a public facilities bill - moves she said would streamline the planning process but that opponents say will thwart efforts to control growth. The adequate public facilities ordinance (APFO) would require that adequate fire, police, water and road support be in place before major new developments could move forward. The current development delay halted new projects until the legislation is put in place.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1999
Parents of pupils at three elementary schools in Ellicott City and Elkridge said last night that the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance has not prevented school crowding and has forced the redistricting of their children. More than two dozen parents who have children in the Ilchester, Rockburn and Worthington elementary schools urged County Councilman Christopher J. Merdon to strengthen the 1992 ordinance, which bars home construction around schools that have enrollments more than 20 percent over capacity.
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