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Facial Expressions

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By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 2006
The signature family expression of joy or hangdog remorse might be more than a matter of monkey see, monkey do. It might be hard-wired into our brains. By comparing the videotaped facial responses of 21 people born blind with those of their family members, researchers at the University of Haifa in Israel found similarities in expressions of concentration, sadness, anger, disgust, joy and surprise. "There's plenty of evidence that facial expressions are inherited," says Gili Peleg, a doctoral candidate at the university's Institute of Evolution and lead investigator on the study.
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NEWS
By Amy Davis and Amy Davis,Sun Photographer | November 25, 2007
My assignment to photograph two lucky teachers who had been selected as winners of the $25,000 Milken National Educator awards felt more like being invited to a surprise party than an assignment. Kiara Delle Hargrove, a chemistry teacher at Baltimore's Polytechnic Institute, and Mabrooka Chaudhry, who teaches social studies at Atholton High School in Columbia, supposedly had no way of knowing they were in the running for the awards, which have been called "the Oscars of teaching" by Teacher magazine.
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NEWS
By Amy Davis and Amy Davis,Sun Photographer | November 25, 2007
My assignment to photograph two lucky teachers who had been selected as winners of the $25,000 Milken National Educator awards felt more like being invited to a surprise party than an assignment. Kiara Delle Hargrove, a chemistry teacher at Baltimore's Polytechnic Institute, and Mabrooka Chaudhry, who teaches social studies at Atholton High School in Columbia, supposedly had no way of knowing they were in the running for the awards, which have been called "the Oscars of teaching" by Teacher magazine.
NEWS
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 2006
The signature family expression of joy or hangdog remorse might be more than a matter of monkey see, monkey do. It might be hard-wired into our brains. By comparing the videotaped facial responses of 21 people born blind with those of their family members, researchers at the University of Haifa in Israel found similarities in expressions of concentration, sadness, anger, disgust, joy and surprise. "There's plenty of evidence that facial expressions are inherited," says Gili Peleg, a doctoral candidate at the university's Institute of Evolution and lead investigator on the study.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | March 27, 1993
Charles Darwin would have been proud.When fifth-grader Adam Staley grabbed a mask depicting a wide, open mouth in a surprised "O," he did something Darwin could have predicted more than 100 years ago. Adam automatically opened his eyes wide, forming a mock shocked expression to match the surprised mouth on the mask.In 1872, Darwin wrote "The Expressions of Emotion in Man and Animals," theorizing that facial expressions -- like sadness, anger, distrust and surprise -- are innate and universal.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2003
A baby who sees his father burst into tears suddenly starts crying himself, his sad little face the very picture of misery. Is this empathy? Or is it, as psychologist Andrew Meltzoff thinks, something less exalted, such as emotional "contagion"? A slightly more evolved toddler watches her mother wince and yell "ouch!" after hitting herself with a hammer. The child picks up a teddy bear to give it to her mother. Now, that has to be empathy, right? The child not only knew what her mother was feeling, she had an appropriately compassionate response.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JAKE COYLE | December 22, 2005
NEW YORK -- In computer-generated bodies not his own, Andy Serkis has starred in two of the most humongously budgeted films of the decade. Serkis, who stands 5 feet 8 inches, plays Kong in Peter Jackson's King Kong. As he did for the "precious"-hungry Gollum in Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy, Serkis' human performance has again been transformed by computer graphics into a fantastical creature. As with Gollum/Smeagol, the actor's every movement was meticulously captured and enlarged into the computer-generated image that is the hulking Kong.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 10, 2005
ONE OF THE JOYS of living in the Free State is receiving your Vehicle Emissions Inspection Notice in the mail and then setting out on the mind-numbing journey to the testing center. It seems like a fairly cut-and-dried process, right? Either you fail, because your car is spewing great clouds of toxic pollutants into the air, or you pass. Well, sort of. As it happens, there is a third category you can land in, a sort of vehicle-emissions purgatory, which I discovered when I had my car tested last week.
FEATURES
By Bill Thomas and Bill Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 1996
When President Bill Clinton accepts his party's nomination at the Democratic Convention tonight, his speech will be instantly analyzed, probed and dissected. But will it be remembered?"Not very likely," says Steven Keller, assistant professor of political communication at George Washington University. "The point of most political speeches today isn't to say something memorable. It's to help project an image that looks good on television."Americans used to choose their leaders largely on the basis of what kind of speeches they gave.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | August 7, 1991
Janie Howard Hanky was just a toddler when her famous "Stooge" father, Jerome "Curly" Howard, died.But the Westminster resident stillhas memories and favorite stories to tell of her dad and uncles Moe and Shemp."
ENTERTAINMENT
By JAKE COYLE | December 22, 2005
NEW YORK -- In computer-generated bodies not his own, Andy Serkis has starred in two of the most humongously budgeted films of the decade. Serkis, who stands 5 feet 8 inches, plays Kong in Peter Jackson's King Kong. As he did for the "precious"-hungry Gollum in Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy, Serkis' human performance has again been transformed by computer graphics into a fantastical creature. As with Gollum/Smeagol, the actor's every movement was meticulously captured and enlarged into the computer-generated image that is the hulking Kong.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 10, 2005
ONE OF THE JOYS of living in the Free State is receiving your Vehicle Emissions Inspection Notice in the mail and then setting out on the mind-numbing journey to the testing center. It seems like a fairly cut-and-dried process, right? Either you fail, because your car is spewing great clouds of toxic pollutants into the air, or you pass. Well, sort of. As it happens, there is a third category you can land in, a sort of vehicle-emissions purgatory, which I discovered when I had my car tested last week.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2003
A baby who sees his father burst into tears suddenly starts crying himself, his sad little face the very picture of misery. Is this empathy? Or is it, as psychologist Andrew Meltzoff thinks, something less exalted, such as emotional "contagion"? A slightly more evolved toddler watches her mother wince and yell "ouch!" after hitting herself with a hammer. The child picks up a teddy bear to give it to her mother. Now, that has to be empathy, right? The child not only knew what her mother was feeling, she had an appropriately compassionate response.
FEATURES
By Bill Thomas and Bill Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 1996
When President Bill Clinton accepts his party's nomination at the Democratic Convention tonight, his speech will be instantly analyzed, probed and dissected. But will it be remembered?"Not very likely," says Steven Keller, assistant professor of political communication at George Washington University. "The point of most political speeches today isn't to say something memorable. It's to help project an image that looks good on television."Americans used to choose their leaders largely on the basis of what kind of speeches they gave.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | March 27, 1993
Charles Darwin would have been proud.When fifth-grader Adam Staley grabbed a mask depicting a wide, open mouth in a surprised "O," he did something Darwin could have predicted more than 100 years ago. Adam automatically opened his eyes wide, forming a mock shocked expression to match the surprised mouth on the mask.In 1872, Darwin wrote "The Expressions of Emotion in Man and Animals," theorizing that facial expressions -- like sadness, anger, distrust and surprise -- are innate and universal.
NEWS
Ron Smith | August 18, 2011
A moment ago, I Googled "Ron Paul ignored by media" and came up with 9,222 links. That's a lot of stories about someone being ignored. Here's what happened. In last weekend's Iowa Straw Poll of GOP presidential candidates, the Texas congressman had an exceptionally strong showing, finishing a mere 152 votes behind the winner, Minnesota Rep.Michele Bachmann. Mrs. Bachmann — or the "Queen of Rage," as Newsweek magazine dubbed her — followed her Saturday triumph with Sunday talk show interviews on ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox News Channel and CNN. Ron Paul appeared on none.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | March 30, 2006
Brian Regan Tonight, comedian Brian Regan will be at the Hippodrome Theatre in the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, 12 N. Eutaw St. Now on his second national theater tour, Regan brings an oafish stance, silly facial expressions and plenty of laughs. He's also supporting a debut DVD, I Walked on the Moon. The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are $34.50-38.50. Call 410-547-SEAT or visit ticketmaster.com to order.
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