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Face Transplant

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 15, 2012
Johns Hopkins doctors have received approval from the university's institutional review board to begin doing face transplant surgeries, becoming the second hospital in Baltimore to offer the complex procedure. There have been only 22 such operations around the world, including the most extensive one ever performed earlier this year at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Read details in this Baltimore Sun story . The procedures now can include not only tissue but underlying bones from a donor.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 23, 2013
A Swiss businessman has given the The University of Maryland School of Medicine $2.5 million to create a professorship in plastic and reconstructive surgery with the first awarded to the doctor who recently performed a groundbreaking face transplant. Dr. Eduardo D. Rodriguez will be invested at a ceremony later this year. He led a team last year in a 36-hour face transplant that included replacement of both jaws, teeth, tongue, skin and underlying nerve and muscle tissue from the scalp to the neck.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 26, 2012
University of Maryland doctors plan Tuesday to detail their complicated 36-hour operation to give a 37-year-old man a new face. Maryland says the face transplant, which occurred March 19-20 at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center , was the most extensive face transplant done. The man received a face, including upper and lower jawbones, teeth, a port of tongue and soft tissue from the hairline to the neck. The recipient has not been named. The donor also contributed organs anonymously to five others.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 15, 2012
Johns Hopkins doctors have received approval from the university's institutional review board to begin doing face transplant surgeries, becoming the second hospital in Baltimore to offer the complex procedure. There have been only 22 such operations around the world, including the most extensive one ever performed earlier this year at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Read details in this Baltimore Sun story . The procedures now can include not only tissue but underlying bones from a donor.
BUSINESS
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
When Richard Lee Norris opened his eyes after a marathon 36-hour surgery to give him a new face, he immediately wanted a mirror. A natural reaction for a man who had been practically living as a recluse since a 1997 gun accident took off his nose, chin, lips and teeth, said doctors from the University of Maryland who had just performed the world's most extensive face transplant on the 37-year-old from Hillsville, Va. Norris is relearning to...
HEALTH
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
The University of Maryland said Tuesday that it had completed a rare full face transplant on a 37-year-old man, including a double jaw and tongue. The 36-hour surgery was performed at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center by a team of doctors from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Officials did not release the name of the patient or donor but plan to offer more information on the procedure next week. Across the city, John Hopkins Hospital has also put together a team of surgeons that could do a face transplant.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
A week after French doctors conducted the world's first partial face transplant, two U.S. bioethicists question whether the procedure may have been performed prematurely given its risks. Carson Strong, a medical ethics professor at the University of Tennessee-Memphis, said the procedure is not safe because of the likelihood that donated skin will be rejected by the body's immune system. Arthur Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, said the surgeons should have assigned an independent advocate to advise the 38-year-old woman on the extraordinary risks involved in replacing her lips, nose and facial tissue.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 23, 2013
A Swiss businessman has given the The University of Maryland School of Medicine $2.5 million to create a professorship in plastic and reconstructive surgery with the first awarded to the doctor who recently performed a groundbreaking face transplant. Dr. Eduardo D. Rodriguez will be invested at a ceremony later this year. He led a team last year in a 36-hour face transplant that included replacement of both jaws, teeth, tongue, skin and underlying nerve and muscle tissue from the scalp to the neck.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
ON THE SITE... Baltimore County schools , Howard County schools name superintendents: Two finalists were considered for both jobs, with a Houston school administrator getting hired in Baltimore County and a Baltimore County deputy superintendent hired in Howard County. Knife-wielding man shot by city police : A man threatening to harm his mother was shot by an officer in Northwest Baltimore early this morning, critically wounding him, Baltimore police said.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | December 17, 2008
Iraqi shoe hurler is set to appear before judge BAGHDAD: The Iraqi journalist who hurled his shoes at President George W. Bush was expected to appear before a judge today in a first step of a complex legal process that could end in a criminal trial, a government official and the reporter's brother said. Muntadhar al-Zeidi has been in custody since Sunday, when he gained folk hero status in the Arab world by throwing both shoes at Bush during a news conference in Baghdad. Bush ducked twice during the bizarre assault and was not injured.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
ON THE SITE... Baltimore County schools , Howard County schools name superintendents: Two finalists were considered for both jobs, with a Houston school administrator getting hired in Baltimore County and a Baltimore County deputy superintendent hired in Howard County. Knife-wielding man shot by city police : A man threatening to harm his mother was shot by an officer in Northwest Baltimore early this morning, critically wounding him, Baltimore police said.
BUSINESS
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
When Richard Lee Norris opened his eyes after a marathon 36-hour surgery to give him a new face, he immediately wanted a mirror. A natural reaction for a man who had been practically living as a recluse since a 1997 gun accident took off his nose, chin, lips and teeth, said doctors from the University of Maryland who had just performed the world's most extensive face transplant on the 37-year-old from Hillsville, Va. Norris is relearning to...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 26, 2012
University of Maryland doctors plan Tuesday to detail their complicated 36-hour operation to give a 37-year-old man a new face. Maryland says the face transplant, which occurred March 19-20 at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center , was the most extensive face transplant done. The man received a face, including upper and lower jawbones, teeth, a port of tongue and soft tissue from the hairline to the neck. The recipient has not been named. The donor also contributed organs anonymously to five others.
HEALTH
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
The University of Maryland said Tuesday that it had completed a rare full face transplant on a 37-year-old man, including a double jaw and tongue. The 36-hour surgery was performed at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center by a team of doctors from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Officials did not release the name of the patient or donor but plan to offer more information on the procedure next week. Across the city, John Hopkins Hospital has also put together a team of surgeons that could do a face transplant.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | December 17, 2008
Iraqi shoe hurler is set to appear before judge BAGHDAD: The Iraqi journalist who hurled his shoes at President George W. Bush was expected to appear before a judge today in a first step of a complex legal process that could end in a criminal trial, a government official and the reporter's brother said. Muntadhar al-Zeidi has been in custody since Sunday, when he gained folk hero status in the Arab world by throwing both shoes at Bush during a news conference in Baghdad. Bush ducked twice during the bizarre assault and was not injured.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
A week after French doctors conducted the world's first partial face transplant, two U.S. bioethicists question whether the procedure may have been performed prematurely given its risks. Carson Strong, a medical ethics professor at the University of Tennessee-Memphis, said the procedure is not safe because of the likelihood that donated skin will be rejected by the body's immune system. Arthur Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, said the surgeons should have assigned an independent advocate to advise the 38-year-old woman on the extraordinary risks involved in replacing her lips, nose and facial tissue.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 2, 1999
Transplant surgeons who once concentrated on vital organs such as hearts, livers and kidneys are branching out, transplanting an array of body parts with surprising success and possibly heralding a day when tissues not essential to life are routinely given to others.To the astonishment of many experts, two men recently given new hands in Lyon, France, and Louisville, Ky., are progressing well, without rejection crises. With less publicity, surgeons elsewhere have successfully performed experimental knee, larynx, trachea, femur, nerve and muscle transplants.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
Like any mother, Michelec Kehl of Bowleys Quarters wants her son, Jonathan, to be a normal, growing teen-ager -- one who can run, jump and revel in the excitement of rough-and-tumble sports.Until 1 1/2 years ago, Jonathan, 15, could do all this and more. Then, in August 1989, on the first family vacation in five years, he fractured his left hip in a water-skiing accident in Harford County.He's had surgery that did not work and has been diagnosed as having avascular osteo necrosis, or bone death, which is caused by a lack of blood flowing into his hip. He has spent most of the past two years on crutches.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 2, 1999
Transplant surgeons who once concentrated on vital organs such as hearts, livers and kidneys are branching out, transplanting an array of body parts with surprising success and possibly heralding a day when tissues not essential to life are routinely given to others.To the astonishment of many experts, two men recently given new hands in Lyon, France, and Louisville, Ky., are progressing well, without rejection crises. With less publicity, surgeons elsewhere have successfully performed experimental knee, larynx, trachea, femur, nerve and muscle transplants.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
Like any mother, Michelec Kehl of Bowleys Quarters wants her son, Jonathan, to be a normal, growing teen-ager -- one who can run, jump and revel in the excitement of rough-and-tumble sports.Until 1 1/2 years ago, Jonathan, 15, could do all this and more. Then, in August 1989, on the first family vacation in five years, he fractured his left hip in a water-skiing accident in Harford County.He's had surgery that did not work and has been diagnosed as having avascular osteo necrosis, or bone death, which is caused by a lack of blood flowing into his hip. He has spent most of the past two years on crutches.
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