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By EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | August 16, 2011
The modern police patrol car is a wonder of technology, featuring computers with access to police station data banks, plus the Internet, radios, cell phones and, in many cases, video cameras. A patrol car can be a world unto itself, giving a police officer access to all manner of information, and the ability to be in touch with potential backup officers almost constantly. These developments are good. They contribute to an officer's safety, and presumably make police work at least a little bit easier.
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NEWS
August 27, 2014
I am a bit embarrassed that the African-American leaders of Ferguson, Mo. chose the Rev. Al Sharpton as their "national voice" for the community. Or perhaps I got that wrong. The truth may be that Reverend Sharpton foisted himself upon the community ( "Rioting requires police response," Aug. 21). I believe Mr. Sharpton is nothing more than a heat-seeking opportunist whose agenda is more about him greedily grabbing face time on TV. The Tawana Brawley incident occurred approximately three decades ago. With that singular incident, I believe Mr. Sharpton lost credibility among many people who were not African-American.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tionah Lee | July 3, 2013
“What is it about those four pretty girls that attract so many corpses?” Is that really the plan new Lieutenant Tanner? Everyone wants a little face time, and the new state police want to pick everyone's brain about everything … literally everything. At the start of the episode, a very tense Hanna confronts Caleb about all of the detective work he has been doing for her, and all of the clues that lead directly to her mom. Hanna also confronts Spencer when she admits to not having the chance to give Melissa the mask.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Pre-trial arguments are expected to be heard Tuesday in a high-profile murder and drug conspiracy case in which most defendants have flipped and attorneys couldn't review evidence with their clients until two days before trial due to safety concerns from prosecutors. Robert G. Moore, 45, is accused of being at the top of an East Baltimore drug syndicate that killed a man and shot five others to avenge the death of his relative, former prep wrestling standout Darian Kess. Prosecutors pointed to the indictment when it was filed 16 months ago as an example of taking on complex and challenging case.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
All week, it's been Baltimore Ravens 24/7 on the sports channels thanks to Sunday's Super Bowl. But when it comes to cities, all the focus has been on New Orleans, the site of the game, not Baltimore or San Francisco. Tomorrow, Baltimore finally gets a little bit of face time, ranging from CNN reporting on what the Super Bowl has meant to fans in Baltimore to Natalie Morales squirrel dancing at the Inner Harbor for NBC's "Today" show. The Mayor's Office has been told by CNN that the cable news channel will air a feature on the city between 9 and 11 a.m. Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
Baltimore will be getting some face time Thursday morning on NBC's "Today" show with Al Roker doing his weather cut-ins from the Inner Harbor. Roker's first live shot will be at 5:45 a.m. on WBAL's morning news show, according to Dan Joerres, the station's general manager.. The station is NBC's Baltimore affiliate. Roker is in Baltimore for Sailabration, which includes the arrival of some 40 ships in connection with the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 this week. The first ships arrived Wednesday morning.
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Baltimore resident Doug Howard lost 100 pounds taking part in a Johns Hopkins study that could change the way people approach the daunting task of dropping pounds and keeping them off. For the two-year study, Howard, like other participants, was referred by his doctor. He then received coaching, both in person and over the phone. Another group, also referred by a doctor, received counseling over the phone but did not attend in-person sessions. And here's the surprising part: In both groups, participants lost an average of 10 pounds and kept it off. A control group that received a number of weight-loss pamphlets and access to a noninteractive website, but got no phone or in-person support, lost less than 2 pounds on average.
FEATURES
By DEBORAH JACOBS | September 3, 1995
In today's cutthroat work scene, you have more than one reason to dread coming back from a vacation. Has your company been sold? Are you now reporting to a former co-worker? More likely, things will be just as you left them, but you may have been absent for key announcements and meetings.Some people get so worried about skipping a beat that they ruin a good time by constantly calling into the office while they're on vacation. Better to take a real break from the office and just put in extra "face time" during your first few weeks back.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | July 22, 2011
Everyone is talking about proposed cuts to Social Security such as changing the inflation rate used to calculate cost-of-living-adjustments or raising the retirement age. But other cuts are already underway. The agency announced today that it will close its nationwide offices to the public a half hour early each day. Why less face time with the public? Social Security Commissioner Michael J. Astrue says Congress provided nearly $1 billion less for the agency's budget than the president requested.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
Baltimore's favorite half-man, half-fish, Olympian extraordinaire Michael Phelps, will have a cameo on the midseason premiere of USA's "Suits. " Phelps will play himself, the only athlete whom lawyer Harvey Specter (Gabriel Macht) could never land. Things get complicated when rival Scottie (Abigail Spencer) also tries to court Phelps. Phelps is a fan of the show; in July, he tweeted that the current season is "awesooommee!!!" and has listed the show as one of his favorites, according to the Hollywood Reporter.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
Baltimore's favorite half-man, half-fish, Olympian extraordinaire Michael Phelps, will have a cameo on the midseason premiere of USA's "Suits. " Phelps will play himself, the only athlete whom lawyer Harvey Specter (Gabriel Macht) could never land. Things get complicated when rival Scottie (Abigail Spencer) also tries to court Phelps. Phelps is a fan of the show; in July, he tweeted that the current season is "awesooommee!!!" and has listed the show as one of his favorites, according to the Hollywood Reporter.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
Two Maryland women attempted to use their dead mothers' identities to cast illegal votes in last year's presidential election, the state prosecutor's office said Tuesday. Officials said a Frederick County woman was indicted for attempting to cast an absentee ballot for her mother, who died two months before Election Day. And a Montgomery County woman allegedly got her deceased mother's voter registration reactivated and cast a provisional ballot under her name, according to the indictment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tionah Lee | July 3, 2013
“What is it about those four pretty girls that attract so many corpses?” Is that really the plan new Lieutenant Tanner? Everyone wants a little face time, and the new state police want to pick everyone's brain about everything … literally everything. At the start of the episode, a very tense Hanna confronts Caleb about all of the detective work he has been doing for her, and all of the clues that lead directly to her mom. Hanna also confronts Spencer when she admits to not having the chance to give Melissa the mask.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Joe Flacco must have been a strong enough draw Monday night to leave David Letterman wanting more Baltimore Ravens Super Bowl mojo. The "Late Show with David Letterman" Wednesday announced that Ravens coach John Harbaugh will be on Thursday night. Here's the release from CBS: John Harbaugh, head coach of the Super Bowl XLVII champion Baltimore Ravens, will visit the LATE SHOW with DAVID LETTERMAN Thursday, Feb. 7 (11:35 PM-12:37 AM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.  John Harbaugh and his younger brother Jim Harbaugh, head coach of the San Francisco 49ers, became the first pair of brothers to serve as head coaches in the NFL back in 2011 and made more headlines this year when they became the first brothers in NFL history to face each other in a Super Bowl, one which quickly became dubbed the “Harbaugh Bowl.”  The Ravens went on to defeat the 49ers Sunday in Super Bowl XLVII by a score of 34-31, giving the Ravens their second championship title in franchise history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
All week, it's been Baltimore Ravens 24/7 on the sports channels thanks to Sunday's Super Bowl. But when it comes to cities, all the focus has been on New Orleans, the site of the game, not Baltimore or San Francisco. Tomorrow, Baltimore finally gets a little bit of face time, ranging from CNN reporting on what the Super Bowl has meant to fans in Baltimore to Natalie Morales squirrel dancing at the Inner Harbor for NBC's "Today" show. The Mayor's Office has been told by CNN that the cable news channel will air a feature on the city between 9 and 11 a.m. Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
Baltimore will be getting some face time Thursday morning on NBC's "Today" show with Al Roker doing his weather cut-ins from the Inner Harbor. Roker's first live shot will be at 5:45 a.m. on WBAL's morning news show, according to Dan Joerres, the station's general manager.. The station is NBC's Baltimore affiliate. Roker is in Baltimore for Sailabration, which includes the arrival of some 40 ships in connection with the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 this week. The first ships arrived Wednesday morning.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
I am a bit embarrassed that the African-American leaders of Ferguson, Mo. chose the Rev. Al Sharpton as their "national voice" for the community. Or perhaps I got that wrong. The truth may be that Reverend Sharpton foisted himself upon the community ( "Rioting requires police response," Aug. 21). I believe Mr. Sharpton is nothing more than a heat-seeking opportunist whose agenda is more about him greedily grabbing face time on TV. The Tawana Brawley incident occurred approximately three decades ago. With that singular incident, I believe Mr. Sharpton lost credibility among many people who were not African-American.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | March 6, 2005
COLLEGE PARK - Early on in life, kids develop a kind of defense mechanism, a device to shield themselves from disappointment if it should come. Kids often tell themselves or anyone who will listen that something you believe they want really badly - a go-cart, a video game system, an A on a test - doesn't really matter. That way, when the go-cart becomes a bike, the video game becomes a DVD and the A becomes a B, the sting won't exist. In the lead-up to the state wrestling championships, Arundel High freshman Nicole Woody said that getting to Cole Field House wasn't as significant as people were making it out to be, and that winning a state title would be a bonus.
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Baltimore resident Doug Howard lost 100 pounds taking part in a Johns Hopkins study that could change the way people approach the daunting task of dropping pounds and keeping them off. For the two-year study, Howard, like other participants, was referred by his doctor. He then received coaching, both in person and over the phone. Another group, also referred by a doctor, received counseling over the phone but did not attend in-person sessions. And here's the surprising part: In both groups, participants lost an average of 10 pounds and kept it off. A control group that received a number of weight-loss pamphlets and access to a noninteractive website, but got no phone or in-person support, lost less than 2 pounds on average.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
Stanley Needleman's 30-year law career officially came to an abrupt end Thursday when the criminal defense attorney pleaded guilty to tax evasion and agreed to pay more than $1 million in penalties. The plea came four months after agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration raided his downtown law office and Pikesville home, finding $1.15 million in unreported income inside two safes. Agents found a ledger detailing the cash payments from his legal clients, prosecutors said. "Any businessman who receives payments in cash faces the temptation to commit similar crimes — some fall to that temptation," said U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein in an interview after the hearing.
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