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NEWS
November 23, 2010
Behind Perdue's "home sweet home" facade is a vast, multinational corporation that for decades has kept the Chesapeake Bay on life support ("Perdue woos consumers with home, sweet home," Nov. 22). Perdue is an industrial-scale polluter of our cherished waterways. Governments should therefore impose industrial-scale clean-up requirements on Perdue and similar companies. Perdue owns many of the 568 million chickens raised every year on the Delmarva Peninsula. These half-billion birds generate 1.1 billion pounds of manure every year, which contributes to the annual dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay. Unfortunately, Perdue is not alone.
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NEWS
August 13, 2014
The story is told that in 1787, fake villages were erected along the Dneiper River so that Czarina Catherine and her elite guests would not see the deplorable state in which the peasants of her country lived. Well dressed serfs waved happily from the shore as Catherine's barge floated past, only to be stripped of their clothing and returned to crushing poverty after their ruler had floated by. Whether true or myth, such false facades now bear the name of Catherine's favorite General who orchestrated the plot; "Potemkin Villages" have come to symbolize a cynical effort to hide the truth and present a picture of prosperity where none exists.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
The city zoning board has voted unanimously to deny a request by the Facade nightspot in Northwest Baltimore for a new permit to operate as a restaurant with dancing.The lawyer for Facade at 5507 Reisterstown Road said yesterday that the club will appeal the decision to Circuit Court and plans to remain open pending the appeal.Facade has been operating without a permit since September, when the city zoning administrator revoked its original license to operate as a restaurant with dancing.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
A large section of brick facade fell off a National Institutes of Health research facility on the Southeast Baltimore campus of Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, reviving concerns about a building that opened two years late because of other problems. The incident, in which no one was injured, also has raised questions about safety in a city with many large buildings - but no laws requiring their exterior walls to be inspected as they age. Experts say such problems are relatively rare, but could become more common as building standards change.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | October 30, 1991
True to their word, developers of $90 million Commerce Place office tower at Baltimore and South streets have re-erected the former entrance of the old Safe Deposit and Trust Co. building, which previously stood on the site, as part of the base of the new tower.Contractors finished work several weeks ago on the reconstructed entrance portal, which was dismantled piece by piece and placed in storage when the Beaux Arts-style bank at 13 South St. was razed four years ago to make way for the replacement project.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar | December 20, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Baltimore Development Corp. have selected the Maryland Film Festival's proposal for the renovation of the historic Parkway Theatre at 3 W. North Ave., according to an official who spoke Thursday morning at the BDC's monthly board meeting. The city hopes to enter into an exclusive negotiating agreement with the Film Festival shortly, said Darrell Doan, a BDC staffer who manages the corporation's real estate transactions. The Film Festival is partnering with the Maryland Institute College of Art and Johns Hopkins University on their proposal for the Parkway.
NEWS
June 29, 2001
The Maryland Stadium Authority ratified yesterday an agreement under which the lettered facade of Memorial Stadium will be kept intact as city-owned property, state officials said. The state's contract with Potts and Callahan to demolish the stadium was amended to add about $1 million to the original $2.5 million cost. The authority will hire a consultant and contractor to give advice on how to stabilize and support the 10-foot-high wall. Under the agreement between the state and the city, the memorial wall will be maintained by the city after the site is turned over to the nonprofit Govans Ecumenical Development Corp.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | January 25, 1998
ANNAPOLIS' Main Street looks like a smile with a tooth missing.The five-alarm fire Dec. 9, which destroyed restaurants, shops and offices at 184-186 Main St., created an unslightly gap in the street-scape of the state capital's main thoroughfare. All that remains is a two-story burned brick facade supported by steel and wooden shoring.The gap must be filled as quickly as possible. But if initial communications between Ronald B. Hollander, owner of the buildings, and city officials are any indication of what lies ahead, Annapolis may be stuck with this "what, me worry?"
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 24, 2001
A vestige of Edgar Allan Poe's one-time home in New York City will be spared demolition under an agreement negotiated this week by New York University, which owns the building and wants to raze it to erect a classroom building, preservationists say. The facade of the rowhouse at 85 W. Third St. in Greenwich Village will be preserved and renovated to re-create the way it looked when Poe lived there in 1845 and 1846, and incorporated into the new law...
NEWS
By Chris Guy ... and Chris Guy ...,Sun reporter | January 18, 2008
CAMBRIDGE -- Preservationists are scrambling to save the fire-battered facade of a century-old storefront that was destroyed by a seven-alarm blaze Tuesday in the historic business district. Developer Brett Summers has obtained a temporary restraining order blocking demolition of the brick storefront, which housed two antiques shops. The building is next door to an old McCrory's store Summers converted into seven apartments and restaurant space. Summers said the 10-day court order will give the Cambridge Main Street program time to seek an emergency grant to shore up the storefront facade while he and other potential buyers decide whether to bid on it. "My first priority is to make sure [the McCrory's]
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar | December 20, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Baltimore Development Corp. have selected the Maryland Film Festival's proposal for the renovation of the historic Parkway Theatre at 3 W. North Ave., according to an official who spoke Thursday morning at the BDC's monthly board meeting. The city hopes to enter into an exclusive negotiating agreement with the Film Festival shortly, said Darrell Doan, a BDC staffer who manages the corporation's real estate transactions. The Film Festival is partnering with the Maryland Institute College of Art and Johns Hopkins University on their proposal for the Parkway.
EXPLORE
December 2, 2012
The City of Westminster's Facade Improvement Program this week received a state grant of $50,000 as part of Maryland's Community Legacy program awards. The award was part of an overall package of $5.5 million awarded to projects across the state, and was announced by Lt. Governor Anthony G. Brown on Nov. 27 at an event in Baltimore. The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development manages the program. The goal of the Community Legacy initiative is to provide local governments and community development organizations with funding for projects aimed at retaining and attracting businesses and encouraging homeownership and commercial revitalization.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2011
Even when traffic is light, long stretches of Reisterstown Road are often visually busy. Traveling at 35 mph or so, it can be hard to pick out the sign you seek among the competitors. Silk Road Bistro sits well back from the curb in a demure little building set up for two occupants. It's nearest neighbors are small shops of the hair salon, tax preparer and 7-Eleven variety. If you miss the turn into the parking lot, you might opt to keep on driving rather than maneuver through traffic to find your way back, especially if you notice the parking lot is full.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
Behind Perdue's "home sweet home" facade is a vast, multinational corporation that for decades has kept the Chesapeake Bay on life support ("Perdue woos consumers with home, sweet home," Nov. 22). Perdue is an industrial-scale polluter of our cherished waterways. Governments should therefore impose industrial-scale clean-up requirements on Perdue and similar companies. Perdue owns many of the 568 million chickens raised every year on the Delmarva Peninsula. These half-billion birds generate 1.1 billion pounds of manure every year, which contributes to the annual dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay. Unfortunately, Perdue is not alone.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2009
Peltz increases ownership in Legg Mason to 4.75 percent Activist investor Nelson Peltz has increased his ownership stake in Baltimore money manager Legg Mason Inc., according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing this week. Peltz, who joined the company's board this fall after acquiring 4.3 percent of the company's stock, bought an additional 717,000 shares this week. That increases his holdings to just under 7.7 million shares, or 4.75 percent of the company. Peltz is known for targeting good but underperforming brands, but Legg Mason said he is not trying to push for the company's sale or breakup.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2009
Up to 40 commercial buildings in five sections of Baltimore will receive facade improvements under an $800,000 revitalization program funded as part of the federal government's stimulus efforts and administered by the Baltimore Development Corp. The development agency announced this week that it is seeking proposals from architects to oversee facade renovations of privately owned buildings in Belair-Edison, Oldtown, Pigtown, West Baltimore Street and the Pennsylvania Avenue corridor. The money was awarded to Baltimore as part of the federal government's efforts to create jobs to help stimulate the economy through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Feb. 1 is the deadline for architects' proposals to BDC. Donna Langley, director of the Baltimore Main Streets Program, said she expects the facade improvement work to begin by spring.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1998
Chunks of brick and mortar crashed to the sidewalk yesterday morning as a yellow backhoe rammed the front of a fire-damaged Main Street building in Annapolis and turned to dust the center of a controversy that began in a five-alarm blaze in December.Several residents, business people and the merely curious came out at 7 a.m. to watch while contractors began demolishing the bottom portion of the city's first Jewish department store, a 99-year-old structure that city officials and preservationists fought to save in this colonial city.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
It is called Facade -- and to Baltimore officials, that's an apt name.The city contends that the building at 5507 Reisterstown Road in Northwest Baltimore, originally zoned as a restaurant with dancing, is not a restaurant at all but a front for an unlicensed after-hours dance club.City officials are moving aggressively to shut it down. They are being backed in their efforts by area police and business leaders, who say the teen-age and young adult patrons of Facade create problems with vandalism and crowd control outside the club.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 7, 2008
BEIJING - Every morning these past several months, I was reminded that, for the first time in Olympic history, China is poised to win more medals than any other nation. Each time I walked down my stairs, in fact, I was reminded. It was in plain view, right on my wall. Not an exact medal count, but an unavoidable symbol. Last fall, on an earlier visit to Beijing, I was greeted outside my hotel by a Chinese college student. Like most people I've met here, he was exceedingly gracious and friendly.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | May 18, 2008
A rare example of Baltimore's architectural history was nearly lost several years ago when an 1871 firehouse on West Mulberry Street was torn down to make way for redevelopment. It was the only firehouse in Baltimore -- and one of the last surviving buildings in the city -- whose first-floor front facade was made of cast iron, a popular local building material in the 1800s, but not in use today. A quick thinking preservationist saw the demolition work under way and managed to salvage the largest cast-iron pieces before they were carted off for scrap metal.
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