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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
While reworking Sally Thorner's Baltimore home, a space that hadn't been touched in 20 years, designer Christopher Howarth vowed not to buy when he could inventively re-use. In room after room, he re-upholstered — three sofas, multiple armchairs, dining chairs, a headboard, a chaise. "I don't understand the need to get rid of things," the designer says. "If you already have a piece in your home, there's probably a good reason you have it there — you like it. If it works and you just want a new look," you might want to re-upholster.
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FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
June brides remain the majority, but when it comes to wedding fashion, many traditions are long gone, according to Betsy Robinson. "Everything used to be basically the same dress," says Robinson, owner of Betsy Robinson's Bridal Collections in Pikesville. "Now, the great thing with bridal fashion is that anything goes." "Anything" this season includes lighter fabrics, splashes of color and shorter lengths. And as wedding fashion takes its cues from street fashion, one of the biggest trends is a bit of a surprise.
NEWS
By Heather John, Special to Tribune Newspapers | May 20, 2010
If we are to take our cues from GQ magazine, men are no longer rushing for gold — no diamonds, no elaborate chains or any other flashy jewelry. May cover model Jake Gyllenhaal's sole hint of bling is an understated $15 silver tie bar. Looking inside the issue's 162 pages, we find exactly four editorial subjects wearing jewelry beyond wedding rings or watches: a thin chain link bracelet on Lou Dobbs, a David Yurman dog tag and wooden beads on San Francisco Giants pitcher Tim Lincecum, studs on L.A. Dodgers center fielder Matt Kemp and a class ring on Drums guitarist Jacob Graham.
NEWS
April 5, 2010
I found the talkback comments regarding The Sun's Sunday editorial on the need for Marylanders to respond to the national census distressing ("Getting it right," April 4). To think a simple census questionaire can bring out that kind of mean spiritedness! To find something negative is one thing, but the mean spirited tone of the comments is itself a sad commentary of the state of community in our area if not in the country. I wonder if people understand what they are angry about and the negative effect such anger has on them and on the fabric of America.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 21, 2009
People enter the Anne Arundel County Courthouse to get a marriage license, to get divorced, to settle disputes, to testify, and to take care of all sorts of things in their lives. Add one more reason: to visit the just-opened courthouse museum. Founders say the museum, some eight years in the making, weaves together the area's social fabric, history and the law. The goal is to show that the little courthouse in Annapolis not only aired the dirty laundry of the day but dealt with big issues of their eras because the brick building was, and still is, where all aspects of society intersect.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to the Sun | December 20, 2009
Nine years ago, Jay and Nancy Guyther were supervising the construction of their custom-built townhouse in Fells Point while still living in Manhattan. Their initial idea for the 3,600-square-foot residence was to rent it out. Circumstances, like construction plans, are often subject to change. When Jay Guyther was transferred from radio research media company Arbitron's New York office to its Columbia site, the couple sold their condo in the city and made plans to move into the Baltimore property themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
Costume designer Melissa Webb keeps some pretty strange company, all of her own making. There's a Swamp Nymph, a Ghost Bride, a Grassman and a Topiary Woman, all looking like something out of an especially Grimm fairy tale. There's a Death Dance Bird, a collection of feathers on taffeta that is the stuff of an ornithologist's nightmare. And there are four Uppity Ladies, 8-foot-tall women swathed in silk and lace who, physically and emotionally, look down on the rest of us. "They're dramatic, they create drama," Webb, 34, says of her fabric creations, a mixture of earth-toned wariness and unexpected whimsy on display at South Baltimore's Gallery Imperato through Sept.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
The first week of Wimbledon was played under sunny skies, much to the disappointment of workers at W.L. Gore & Associates, but they finally got what they were wishing for this week when the skies opened up and it started sprinkling. That's when a new retractable roof - made of fabric created by Gore workers in Cecil County - was closed over Centre Court at All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club, making for indoor play for the first time since the tournament began in the 1870s. "We were praying for rain and it finally came," said Tom Kelmartin, a product specialist for the company.
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