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April 5, 2010
I found the talkback comments regarding The Sun's Sunday editorial on the need for Marylanders to respond to the national census distressing ("Getting it right," April 4). To think a simple census questionaire can bring out that kind of mean spiritedness! To find something negative is one thing, but the mean spirited tone of the comments is itself a sad commentary of the state of community in our area if not in the country. I wonder if people understand what they are angry about and the negative effect such anger has on them and on the fabric of America.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Harry E. Klages, a World War II pilot who owned Cathell Bros. & Co. Inc. and was a longtime volunteer with the Friends of Jerusalem Mill, died Monday at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center of complications from a fall. He was 93. The son of Harry E. Klages, a Chesapeake Bay pilot, and Lillian Seth Klages, a homemaker, Harry Ernest Klages was born in Baltimore. When he was 8 months old, his mother died, and his father turned him over to an uncle and aunt who raised him in the city's Mayfield neighborhood and also at another home on the Magothy River.
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FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
Rita St. Clair and her staff turned to an ancient classic when the Baltimore interior designer was asked to decorate a room upon her induction into the Washington Design Center Hall of Fame. The group wanted a fabric to accent a number of pieces in the room and make them pop. They chose ikat. With its Central Asian origins and exotic feel, ikat — a weaving and dyeing technique that uses a range of materials — was perfect for creating a room inspired by a worldly family. The team used the colorful fabric for chair covers and pillows to offset the muted tones of the room.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Philip C. Cooper, a retired design executive who had been president of a New York fabric and furniture house, ended his life in Baltimore on April 3. He was 78 and had lived on Mount Royal Avenue. Born in Denton, he was the son of Gail F. Cooper, a furniture merchant, and Margaret C. Cooper, an artist and musician. A 1953 graduate of Caroline High School, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Swarthmore College. He also attended the University of Oslo in Norway for a summer. He served in the Army from 1957 to 1959.
FEATURES
By Linda Bennett | October 31, 1993
The outfit is familiar: pre-washed denim, rugby stripes, Oxford shirting, cable knit and flannel. But this particular ensemble is being worn by a plump, slightly rumpled sofa, not your accountant on his day off.Apparel fabric used as upholstery is the single hottest trend at this fall's International Home Furnishings Market, where it's sometimes hard to tell where the sitter ends and the settee begins.Alex Bernhardt, whose company introduced a unique home furnishings-clothing boutique concept last spring, told a press gathering on the first day of market that "People like to sit on what they wear."
FEATURES
By BETH SMITH | May 22, 1994
When Mark and Carol Goodman bought a traditional house in Baltimore City, they moved in without any furniture for the living room. The Goodmans, who moved here from a high-rise apartment in New York City, did have some contemporary pieces, but they had been shuffled into the den.After looking at an empty living room for about a year, Mrs. Goodman hired interior designer Donna Foertsch of D.L.F. Designs and together they decided to look first for fabric. "When I am starting from scratch in a room, I really like to find the boldest, most multi-patterned fabric first," says Ms. Foertsch.
NEWS
By Michael Quintanilla and Michael Quintanilla,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2000
Sewing machines hum around David Cardona as he reaches for one of his creations-in-progress, a gown of shiny metallic-looking fabric he has nicknamed "oil slick." He holds up another. "I call it my ice cream cone dress," says the Los Angeles designer about the garment that flares like upside-down ice cream cones in seven places around the gown's hem. "This is one of those dresses that uses up a lot of fabric. But I think it's cool. It's different -- and that's what I'm trying to be, different."
FEATURES
By RITA ST. CLAIR | May 26, 1991
Q: I have collected shawls, scarves and bits and pieces of fabric throughout the years and in my travels to various parts of the world. As you might gather, I'm fascinated by textiles. But I still need your advice as to how some of them might best be displayed as decorative objects in my home.A: I, too, suffer from textile mania. And like you, I'm forever looking for new ways to display wonderful examples of the weaver's or embroiderer's art.You probably already know that priceless antique textiles should probably be kept in a dark and temperature-controlled environment.
FEATURES
By RITA ST. CLAIR | September 30, 1990
Q: I'm looking for a new headboard for my average-size bedroom, which has traditional mahogany furniture, a dark wood floor and off-white walls. Can you suggest an interesting design, not necessarily in wood, that would help make the room look a bit larger and more sophisticated?A: Let me encourage you not to add more wood to a setting that already has quite enough. As an alternative, you might also try creating a headboard out of fabric. The photo depicts just that sort of solution.This treatment may look rather elaborate, but it's really quite simple and not as heavy as an actual canopy.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Two years after merging football and fashion with splashy new football uniforms, Under Armour and Maryland were at it again Thursday night. The Baltimore-based company unveiled the next iteration of its "Maryland Pride" uniforms, featuring a Maryland-flag-inspired red jersey it says will be impossible for opposing players to grab onto. The "no grab" technology was the highlight of the "Maryland Pride 2.0" uniform that debuted in a Harbor East ceremony that included Maryland band members and Ravens wide receiver and former Terps star Torrey Smith.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 25, 2013
Although Eileen Williams works in fabric and Deborah Berman works in paper collage, these two artists share a collage-oriented artistic sensibility in their separate exhibits at the Columbia Art Center. Williams calls her show "Celebration of Women Through Faces in Fabric. " Her wall-hanging fabric panels incorporate various materials, designs and cultural references, but they have in common Williams' inclusion of female masks that would be suitable for a costume ball. These masks are prominently featured in some of her panels, but in other panels the masks are nearly submerged beneath all of the other clustered and layered forms.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries ... and fabrics. Columbia resident Mavis Slawson has made the latter her specialty as a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. She often gives presentations about the role of textiles in the Civil War, examining their role not only as practical materials but also in conveying and preserving culture across the battlefield.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Two years after merging football and fashion with splashy new football uniforms, Under Armour and Maryland were at it again Thursday night. The Baltimore-based company unveiled the next iteration of its "Maryland Pride" uniforms, featuring a Maryland-flag-inspired red jersey it says will be impossible for opposing players to grab onto. The "no grab" technology was the highlight of the "Maryland Pride 2.0" uniform that debuted in a Harbor East ceremony that included Maryland band members and Ravens wide receiver and former Terps star Torrey Smith.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Charles W. Thomas Jr., former owner of several steel fabrication companies and a Korean War veteran, died Saturday from renal failure at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Mays Chapel resident was 85. The son of Charles W. Thomas Sr., owner of Acme Steel Engineering Co., and Mary J. Thomas, a homemaker, Charles Wesley Thomas Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating in 1947 from the McDonogh School, Mr. Thomas followed his father into the steel fabrication business.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Sketches from the world's top designers show a movement for spring 2014 collections toward island prints, airy fabrics and flowy silhouettes - a stark change from the darker hues and overarching Russian themes found in the fall collections shown in February. When models hit the New York runways beginning Sept. 5 for Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, many will wear garments with decidedly tropical influences. The islands inspired Annapolis native and "Project Runway" alum Christian Siriano's collection, for example.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | June 13, 2013
Go to the usual exhibit and you'll visualize how the artwork hanging on the gallery wall would look hanging on your living room wall. An exhibit installed at both the Columbia Art Center and Howard Community College, "Wear Art," encourages one to contemplate how women would look wearing the exhibited clothing and jewelry. Although this Columbia Festival of the Arts-connected exhibit includes its share of whimsical creations, everything is functional. One might not be inclined to wear these items while mowing the lawn, but they'd make a lady look fashionably distinctive for a night on the town.
FEATURES
By RITA ST.CLAIR and RITA ST.CLAIR,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 25, 1991
Q: Instead of the usual wallpaper, I had planned to cover a wall in my dining room with a fabric that I like. A friend told me that the installation method would be more complicated than for wallpaper. Do you think it's still sensible for me to pursue the fabric option?A: While I'm not an expert on installation techniques, I do think your friend has exaggerated the difficulty of applying a fabric wall covering.Latex or paper-backed fabrics can easily be affixed to a wall by a professional paperhanger.
NEWS
August 6, 1991
Helene A. Fisher, a fabric artist and teacher, died Aug. 4 at the Shock-Trauma Unit in Baltimore from injuries resulting from a July 4 automobile accident. She was 64.Services for Mrs. Fisher will be held at 1 p.m. tomorrow at the chapel at Gawler's funeral establishment, 5130 Wisconsin Ave., Washington.Born in New York City, she was reared in the District of Columbia and graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School. She received a bachelor's degree in education from the University of Maryland at College Park.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
A multicolored grouping of four clapboard rowhouses in Fells Point stands out like Gerbera daisies against the Formstone and brick fronts of its neighbors on either side. Architect Myrna Poirier calls one of these gems home and will soon invite visitors beyond her threshold as part of the Historic Harbor House Tour of Fells Point on Mother's Day. In keeping with the facade of her home, the interior is a color-infused, uplifting space. "Color is so important," she said. "A lot of people don't realize what color does for your spirits," pointing to an open interior 50 feet deep, with soft pastel paint on the walls in each room, richly embellished textiles from all over the world hanging on them and the morning sun bursting through ceiling skylights.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | March 28, 2012
Hate speech is a form of vandalism. It defaces the environment, and like a broken window, if left untended, signals to other hoodlums that the coast is clear to do more damage. But unlike the proverbial broken window, which urban police departments and criminologists urge us to repair to maintain the aura of social order, nobody seems to be in much of a hurry to nip hate speech in the bud. That's because since the ill-fated attempt by several universities to regulate hate speech in the 1980s and 1990s, any discussion of reining in racist taunts inevitably degrades into charges of political correctness and ends abruptly with the invocation of the First Amendment.
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