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NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With the doors closed and only one other congressman in the small room on the first floor of the Capitol, Rep. Jerry Lewis dropped a bomb."
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BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1999
Top House and Senate budget negotiators have begun closed-door sessions that will determine the fate of the Lockheed Martin-built F-22 fighter plane.Rumors flew over the weekend about deals to save the jet from a $1.8 billion budget cut approved in July by the House, but nothing has been resolved."
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1997
The radar-evading F-22 fighter plane managed to zip safely past Congressional budget negotiators this week, relieving Lockheed Martin Corp. officials who dreaded further cuts.But another defense project with Maryland ties -- the Arsenal Ship -- may be headed for the briny deep.Pentagon officials told budget conferees last month that the Arsenal Ship -- a missile platform -- needed $85 million for next year to stay on track. In the appropriations agreement released yesterday, the program got $35 million.
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives voted yesterday to eliminate funding for the next six F-22 Raptor fighter planes, thrusting the Air Force's most coveted new weapon system into limbo.By a vote of 379-43, the House approved a $266 billion defense spending plan that omits $1.8 billion the Pentagon had wanted for buying the planes next year.The measure also would put a halt on two F-22s the Pentagon agreed to buy this year from lead contractor Lockheed Martin Corp. of Bethesda.Though $1.2 billion remains in the House-approved budget for continuing to develop the F-22, contractors, the Air Force and President Clinton have argued that zeroing out money to build the planes would kill the $62.7 billion program.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1999
He has had a month to reconsider the bold move that the Air Force said jeopardized its most important new weapon, the F-22 fighter plane.Rep. Jerry Lewis spent the congressional recess that ended last week listening to argument upon argument about why he should put $1.8 billion back into the budget for buying the next six copies of the Lockheed Martin-built plane.The California Republican, who heads the military spending subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee, visited factories near Atlanta and Seattle where workers depend on the $62.7 billion F-22 program for jobs.
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- There will be no combat-ready F-22 fighter planes produced next year, but the Pentagon can buy up to six test versions of the jet under a compromise military spending plan that House and Senate negotiators agreed to last night.The plan both saves the Lockheed Martin-built aircraft from a proposed cut that supporters said would kill it and requires the contractor to test the complex plane more thoroughly before the Pentagon commits to buying it.A House-Senate conference committee produced the plan as part of a $267.
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1999
No military program has seemed more politically invincible than the Air Force's F-22 Raptor fighter jet, but suddenly the Lockheed Martin Corp. warplane looks wounded.This week, the House of Representatives will consider cutting $1.8 billion from next year's defense budget for buying six F-22s. The House Appropriations Committee endorsed the cut Friday, setting up a debate over the future of the program and over the Air Force itself."The committee's greatest concern is that the Air Force, because of its fixation on a single solution -- that is, the F-22 -- that they have ignored and indeed almost let fall apart a whole array of [other]
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 12, 2003
Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin Corp. has received 83 percent of its eligible bonus for a six-month period even as the Air Force was concluding that the F/A-22 fighter program would have an $876 million cost overrun, according to service records. Marvin Sambur, the Air Force's top acquisition official, said the formula for setting bonuses should be revised in light of the rising costs and delays in many service programs. Contractors should get high awards for exceptional performance and "feel the sting" if they fall short, he said.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1999
The Pentagon has agreed to spend $805 million to begin work on the six F-22 fighter planes that Congress almost eliminated over the summer, a Lockheed Martin Corp. official said yesterday.The release of the money, plus another $275 million as down payment on 10 more planes, proves that three months of political turmoil wound up having little effect on the mechanics of the program -- at least for next year."Basically, the decision did not impact how we go about executing," said Bob Rearden, the vice president and general manager for the F-22 program at Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems in Marietta, Ga.But the $62.7 billion program's long-term health is still wounded by Congress' moves to trim funds and to take a harder look at the jet's performance and the military's need for it, one analyst said.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A defense industry executive and a consultant sat down to lunch in an Asian restaurant near Chevy Chase.The executive was fuming. Earlier that morning of Oct. 13, Congress had finally passed a military spending bill for next year that included money for the F-22 fighter. But it had been a battle, all because Rep. Jerry Lewis of California blindsided the Pentagon with a plan to stop building the plane.Dumping spicy chicken over steamed rice, the executive, who asked not to be identified, marveled that one congressman could wreak such havoc.
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