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By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
On an early April morning in 2004, an off-duty Baltimore police detective stuck in traffic on York Road watched a gunman pump six bullets into Jeruan Doles. The officer was 15 feet away and watched the gunman run right by his car. In a report filed a week later, Detective Kenneth Bailey described the shooter only as a "black male." Six months later, a man arrested on a heroin charge told police he had been inside the Tower Lounge on York Road shortly before the shooting and seen the victim argue with another man, whom he identified by nickname, and then watched the man kill 28-year-old Doles outside the bar. Both the bar patron and the detective picked the suspect from a photo array, and police arrested and charged Tavon Bomar in the killing.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 20, 2012
So the people got sick of it, all those criminals being coddled by all those bleeding heart liberal judges with all their soft-headed concern for rights and rehabilitation. And a wave swept this country in the Reagan years, a wave ridden by pundits and politicians seeking power, a wave that said, no mercy, no more. From now on, judges would be severely limited in the sentences they could hand down for certain crimes, required to impose certain punishments whether or not they thought those punishments fit the circumstances at hand.
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NEWS
January 15, 2012
It's pointless to waste of taxpayer dollars on a death-penalty case in which the defendant is already serving a sentence of life-plus-15 years for murder. Regarding your article about the trial of a prisoner accused of killing a corrections officer, I doubt the jury can be impartial toward a defendant who has already been convicted of murder ("Trial opens in prison officer's killing," Jan. 12). Just because the prosecutor has DNA evidence, one of the requirements for seeking the death penalty under the change in state law passed in 2009, doesn't mean the death penalty should be sought.
NEWS
January 15, 2012
It's pointless to waste of taxpayer dollars on a death-penalty case in which the defendant is already serving a sentence of life-plus-15 years for murder. Regarding your article about the trial of a prisoner accused of killing a corrections officer, I doubt the jury can be impartial toward a defendant who has already been convicted of murder ("Trial opens in prison officer's killing," Jan. 12). Just because the prosecutor has DNA evidence, one of the requirements for seeking the death penalty under the change in state law passed in 2009, doesn't mean the death penalty should be sought.
EXPLORE
August 2, 2011
Reasonable doubt. It's the standard by which we are judged in the criminal courts in this country, but it's a standard that's neither easy to define nor easy for prosecutors to establish. Hung juries, like the one that failed to reach a verdict last week in the case of a suspected high ranking member of the Bloods street gang, are the hallmark of a legal system that struggles with what it means to have reasonable doubt. The fate of the defendant in this case remains an open question.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 20, 2012
So the people got sick of it, all those criminals being coddled by all those bleeding heart liberal judges with all their soft-headed concern for rights and rehabilitation. And a wave swept this country in the Reagan years, a wave ridden by pundits and politicians seeking power, a wave that said, no mercy, no more. From now on, judges would be severely limited in the sentences they could hand down for certain crimes, required to impose certain punishments whether or not they thought those punishments fit the circumstances at hand.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | April 5, 2003
LET'S MAKE a pre-emptive strike against nonsense, shall we? Let's head off at the pass all those folks who love to bash Baltimore jurors. Let's catch their dice before they even roll 'em. On Wednesday, one of those maligned Baltimore juries couldn't reach a verdict in the matter of 20-year-old Perry Spain, the man charged with shooting 10-year-old Tevin Davis in the neck in July. The boy lived. His father, Rodney Harden, testified that Spain was the shooter. Eleven jurors wanted to acquit Spain.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1997
A divided state Court of Appeals ruled yesterday that a trial judge must at least consider instructing jurors on how to evaluate eyewitness testimony in a criminal trial.The top court chided a now-retired Baltimore City judge for his blanket refusal to instruct the jury on eyewitness identification of defendants in the two cases it overturned.Circuit Court Judge David Ross, reached at home last night, had not seen the ruling and would not comment."But I never give that instruction. It is regrettable it found its way into the pattern jury instructions," Ross was quoted in the opinion as telling lawyers in one of the cases.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 17, 2007
The pictures were jumpy and the words occasionally jumbled, but the most immediate and compelling descriptions of yesterday's massacre at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., came not from seasoned reporters - but from citizen journalists, most of whom have yet to graduate from college. On CNN, the earliest on-scene pictures and words were provided by Jamal Albarghouti, a Virginia Tech graduate student from the West Bank. His cell phone pictures of police charging Norris Hall as shots rang out were broadcast and streamed over and over throughout the day. By dinnertime, CNN was featuring Albarghouti standing on campus, microphone in hand, reporting from the scene as he talked with anchorman Wolf Blitzer, who was in the cable channel's Washington newsroom.
NEWS
By Jamie Talan and Jamie Talan,NEWSDAY | June 4, 2004
A Yale University study suggests that eyewitness testimony may not be all it's cracked up to be. Stressful conditions impair the accuracy of making an identification, said Dr. Charles Morgan III, an associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. His study was carried out on 509 military service members who participated in a survival training camp. During the training, they were subjected to mock POW interrogations. Half were exposed to a high-stress 30-minute interrogation that included the threat of physical violence.
EXPLORE
August 2, 2011
Reasonable doubt. It's the standard by which we are judged in the criminal courts in this country, but it's a standard that's neither easy to define nor easy for prosecutors to establish. Hung juries, like the one that failed to reach a verdict last week in the case of a suspected high ranking member of the Bloods street gang, are the hallmark of a legal system that struggles with what it means to have reasonable doubt. The fate of the defendant in this case remains an open question.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
On an early April morning in 2004, an off-duty Baltimore police detective stuck in traffic on York Road watched a gunman pump six bullets into Jeruan Doles. The officer was 15 feet away and watched the gunman run right by his car. In a report filed a week later, Detective Kenneth Bailey described the shooter only as a "black male." Six months later, a man arrested on a heroin charge told police he had been inside the Tower Lounge on York Road shortly before the shooting and seen the victim argue with another man, whom he identified by nickname, and then watched the man kill 28-year-old Doles outside the bar. Both the bar patron and the detective picked the suspect from a photo array, and police arrested and charged Tavon Bomar in the killing.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 17, 2007
The pictures were jumpy and the words occasionally jumbled, but the most immediate and compelling descriptions of yesterday's massacre at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., came not from seasoned reporters - but from citizen journalists, most of whom have yet to graduate from college. On CNN, the earliest on-scene pictures and words were provided by Jamal Albarghouti, a Virginia Tech graduate student from the West Bank. His cell phone pictures of police charging Norris Hall as shots rang out were broadcast and streamed over and over throughout the day. By dinnertime, CNN was featuring Albarghouti standing on campus, microphone in hand, reporting from the scene as he talked with anchorman Wolf Blitzer, who was in the cable channel's Washington newsroom.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | April 5, 2003
LET'S MAKE a pre-emptive strike against nonsense, shall we? Let's head off at the pass all those folks who love to bash Baltimore jurors. Let's catch their dice before they even roll 'em. On Wednesday, one of those maligned Baltimore juries couldn't reach a verdict in the matter of 20-year-old Perry Spain, the man charged with shooting 10-year-old Tevin Davis in the neck in July. The boy lived. His father, Rodney Harden, testified that Spain was the shooter. Eleven jurors wanted to acquit Spain.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1997
A divided state Court of Appeals ruled yesterday that a trial judge must at least consider instructing jurors on how to evaluate eyewitness testimony in a criminal trial.The top court chided a now-retired Baltimore City judge for his blanket refusal to instruct the jury on eyewitness identification of defendants in the two cases it overturned.Circuit Court Judge David Ross, reached at home last night, had not seen the ruling and would not comment."But I never give that instruction. It is regrettable it found its way into the pattern jury instructions," Ross was quoted in the opinion as telling lawyers in one of the cases.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
Death row inmate Troy Anthony Davis won a temporary reprieve from the Georgia parole board this month as a succession of witnesses who fingered him as a cop killer admitted that they had the wrong man. Their recantations weren't new; they'd been telling courts and others that they were mistaken in their identification of Mr. Davis for some time now and yet it didn't seem to make a difference until Mr. Davis was within 24 hours of execution. How is that possible in American jurisprudence?
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 22, 2006
PRIME-TIME TELEVISION MIGHT SEEM like the last realm in which one would expect to find historical truth. Three decades of network docudramas carelessly mixing fiction and fact on everyone from Thomas Jefferson to the Kennedys of Massachusetts is largely responsible for that. But tonight on the Discovery cable channel comes Munich: The Real Assassins, a British documentary that goes a long way toward setting the record straight on the 1970's Israeli campaign to kill PLO operatives that became the basis for the controversial Steven Spielberg film, Munich.
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