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NEWS
July 9, 2012
Reading about Baltimore City's opposition to the Tremont Hotel plan reminded me of my utter disdain for the white elephant that is the city's struggling Hilton Hotel on Pratt Street ("City opposes conversion of Tremont Plaza to Embassy Suites," July 6). Every time I attend an Orioles game at Camden Yards, I can't avoid seeing the aesthetic monstrosity just beyond left field. The building's architecture makes absolutely no attempt to fit in with the surrounding structures, and the panoramic view of Baltimore from inside Camden Yards has been thrown into utter disarray since the hotel was erected.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | September 8, 2014
A run-down uninhabited house at 506 Locksley Road that has been the subject of complaints for the last two years from West Towson neighbors has been sold, County Councilman Marks said. "We're happy to get this resolved," said Marks, who represents Towson. "It's been an eyesore. The county worked very, very hard on this. " Marks said the winning bidder was a builder with plans to raze the structure. The auction company, A.J. Billig & Co., confirmed the sale but would not identify the buyer.
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NEWS
November 7, 2013
For the 22nd consecutive year, on Oct. 29, 2013, the U.S. government was again put to shame at the U.N. General Assembly where 188 countries voted to condemn the U.S. embargo of Cuba. The only two countries that supported the U.S. embargo are the U.S. and Israel - with the interesting fact that Israel has full economic and diplomatic relations with Cuba! This punitive embargo goes back to 1960, and it was put in place with the intent of making the Cuban people suffer so that they would rise up and overthrow their government.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
For the 22nd consecutive year, on Oct. 29, 2013, the U.S. government was again put to shame at the U.N. General Assembly where 188 countries voted to condemn the U.S. embargo of Cuba. The only two countries that supported the U.S. embargo are the U.S. and Israel - with the interesting fact that Israel has full economic and diplomatic relations with Cuba! This punitive embargo goes back to 1960, and it was put in place with the intent of making the Cuban people suffer so that they would rise up and overthrow their government.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | January 29, 1992
Workmen began turning an Ellicott City eyesore into a haven for the footsore last week with the start of construction of a "pocket park" connecting lower Main Street to Tiber Alley.The $112,000 project involves building a brick-paved footbridge across the Tiber branch ofthe Patapsco River and setting up five park benches and a picnic table among shrubs on slices of land on either side of the creek."We're pretty thrilled about it, because first of all, it's getting rid of an eyesore," said Kathy Chambers, a board member of the Ellicott City Business Association.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
When architect Justin Seto and his wife, Amy, decided to move from Anne Arundel County to Baltimore, they found the ideal spot in Mount Vernon just north of the Washington Monument — a 20-foot-by-20-foot garage. With its roof burned down and its doors long gone, the pathetic old structure had long been the neighborhood eyesore. "We were looking for a home in the city, and we like modern," said 40-year-old Justin Seto of Seto Architects. "But I didn't want to destroy a historic property.
NEWS
April 13, 1997
WITHOUT FANFARE, city officials have veered away from the long-standing policy of patching up vacant houses in hopes that someone will eventually move in. Instead, they're bulldozing more houses -- 1,000 a year. Given Baltimore's shrinking population, more unsafe older housing should be demolished. But not if it simply means replacing "the eyesore of a vacant house with the eyesore of a vacant lot."Those aren't our words, but those of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who says he intends to alter city demolitions after reading a three-part series in The Sun by John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner on the blight and residential flight fostered by Baltimore's housing policies.
NEWS
September 1, 1993
2 more weeks to demolish an eyesoreAnne Arundel County has given Pasadena businessman Tom Redmond two additional weeks to tear down the Brick House Bar in Lipin's Corner.Mr. Redmond, who operates a salvage yard on Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard, won a $1 contract this summer to demolish the Mountain Road eyesore by mid-August.County spokeswoman Louise Hayman said the county has extended until Sept. 10 the deadline for Mr. Redmond to complete the project, which already is more than half complete.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew M. McDermott and Matthew M. McDermott,Special to the Sun | March 26, 2000
Just below the surface of awareness in the city of Baltimore, words and emotions coalesce into something quite remarkable: the local poetry scene. Its merit is often discounted in a town whose poetic identity seems to lie within the first three letters of the word "poetry" itself. But there is life after Poe. Who is emerging as Poetry Month 2000 begins? Octogenarian Chester Wickwire's refreshing first-collection of poems, "Longs Peak" (Brickhouse Books, 78 pages, $10), exudes a virility that betrays any misconceptions that stagnation comes with age. This is not the pull-my-finger grandpappy poetry that beckons back to Thanksgiving lap rides and embellished fishing stories of summers past.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
Baltimore has thousands of vacant, dilapidated and abandoned houses that create serious health, safety and quality-of-life hazards for city residents. The buildings are eyesores that raise the risk of fires and structural collapses, encourage criminal activity, reduce the attractiveness of neighborhoods to potential buyers and lower property values. They're also the greatest source of urban blight, sucking the life out of communities and making every other social and economic reconstruction task there more difficult.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
Reading about Baltimore City's opposition to the Tremont Hotel plan reminded me of my utter disdain for the white elephant that is the city's struggling Hilton Hotel on Pratt Street ("City opposes conversion of Tremont Plaza to Embassy Suites," July 6). Every time I attend an Orioles game at Camden Yards, I can't avoid seeing the aesthetic monstrosity just beyond left field. The building's architecture makes absolutely no attempt to fit in with the surrounding structures, and the panoramic view of Baltimore from inside Camden Yards has been thrown into utter disarray since the hotel was erected.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
When architect Justin Seto and his wife, Amy, decided to move from Anne Arundel County to Baltimore, they found the ideal spot in Mount Vernon just north of the Washington Monument — a 20-foot-by-20-foot garage. With its roof burned down and its doors long gone, the pathetic old structure had long been the neighborhood eyesore. "We were looking for a home in the city, and we like modern," said 40-year-old Justin Seto of Seto Architects. "But I didn't want to destroy a historic property.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2010
An electric sign put up recently in front of the new West Towson Elementary School has angered neighbors who say it does not fit in with the residential neighborhood. The sign, located on Charles Street across from the Baltimore County Board of Education building, blinks the time and temperature in red. Built in several parts that are stacked on top of one another, it announces the new school as well as Ridge Ruxton School. "I just think the sign is inappropriate. It is out of character with the rest of the neighborhood," said Ralph Ferrell, who lives near the school.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
Baltimore has thousands of vacant, dilapidated and abandoned houses that create serious health, safety and quality-of-life hazards for city residents. The buildings are eyesores that raise the risk of fires and structural collapses, encourage criminal activity, reduce the attractiveness of neighborhoods to potential buyers and lower property values. They're also the greatest source of urban blight, sucking the life out of communities and making every other social and economic reconstruction task there more difficult.
BUSINESS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2010
Four years ago, a neglected mansion sat high on a hill in Oella and was known throughout the neighborhood as the eyesore at the end of the Trolley Tour. But when the house went on the market, Jeanne and Sean St. Martin, who lived right down the street from the wreck, were determined to buy it, restore it and live there for life. In 2006, the couple paid $585,000 for the three-story, historic house that had served in the 1920s as a hotel and retreat for the wealthy called Rock Springs.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | December 27, 2008
Walking through a blighted East Baltimore neighborhood on a recent snowy morning, Del. Talmadge Branch pointed at an empty, boarded-up warehouse on Biddle Street and shook his head. The building should be a multimillion-dollar gym called Hoop City, he said. Children from the neighborhood and members of nearby Israel Baptist Church should be dancing and practicing karate in its studios and kicking soccer balls on indoor courts. That was the vision Branch sold to his pastor at Israel Baptist and the pitch he delivered to colleagues in Annapolis seven years ago. It seemed like a good idea then, and state lawmakers secured $800,000 in two state bond bills to pay for the gym. The administration of then-Mayor Martin O'Malley got on board, buying the building for $200,000 in taxpayer dollars in 2002, selecting Ronald H. Lipscomb as the developer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 8, 2000
"The Watcher" exists for one reason - to establish how many slow-motion sequences can be crammed into one movie. They sure show up everywhere: When the main character is having a dream. When the bad guy is approaching his next victim. When the hero is driving down the street. When the director realizes five minutes have gone by without one. I wish I could simply supply the answer and save untold hundreds the price of admission, but I lost track around 20. At that point - maybe two-thirds of the way through the film - I began addressing what, at the time, seemed like greater concerns.
BUSINESS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Contributing Writer | October 9, 1994
The interior of the three-story, Baltimore rowhouse was completely charred, the foundation was unsound, and termites had feasted on the wooden kitchen addition.For James Moore, it was perfect."I could see the possibilities," says Mr. Moore, whose hobby is buying, renovating and selling Baltimore rowhouses. "It had three stories, and I could do a lot with it."But Mr. Moore wanted this house for himself and his two children.His kids had other ideas."When they saw the house, they said, 'No way,' " recalls the 37-year-old Baltimore native, who divorced his wife seven years ago. "But I told them to just be patient."
NEWS
By Sharahn D. Boykin and Sharahn D. Boykin,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
Sherman Offer was taking his daily walk around his Annapolis apartment building one day when the pavement opened and swallowed his leg. The hole that Offer, 66, encountered 2 1/2 years ago was about the size of a basketball. It has grown into a giant sinkhole, slowly eating nearly 40 parking spaces at the Glenwood high-rise for senior citizens -- an inconvenience for residents, an eyesore for the community and a source of frustration for the federally funded agency that manages the building.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2007
Tacked on the boarded-up, two-story apartment buildings clustered on nearly 10 acres in Northeast Baltimore are identical rectangular signs. "Private Property. No Trespassing! Thank you! Huber Memorial Church." For now, the postings are the only visible evidence of the interest of the large and growing congregation in the former Ramblewood Apartments on Loch Raven Boulevard, across from Good Samaritan Hospital, in one of the city's more solidly middle-class neighborhoods. That could soon begin to change.
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