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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 21, 2005
Everything about Cheaper by the Dozen 2 is applied with a trowel. The sentiment, the cuteness, the macho silliness, the family bonding, even poor Hilary Duff's makeup (someone take away this girl's black eyeliner, pronto!). This movie is one huge pile-on, with everyone in the audience feeling like the poor unfortunate at the bottom of the pile. What can you say about a film where Carmen Electra's performance is one of the high points? Cheaper by the Dozen 2 (20th Century Fox) Starring Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt, Eugene Levy.
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SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | May 22, 2008
Aclassic case of putting lip gloss and eyeliner on a warthog was when the NFL rechristened exhibition games as "preseason" games, thus somehow elevating them in significance. And this Orwellian spin on games that don't count became part of the hazy but lucrative rationale for packaging them with season tickets and extorting fans for full-price admission. So it was interesting to hear NFL commissioner Roger Goodell spell out his own thoughts on increasing the regular season to 17 games by eliminating one preseason game.
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FEATURES
By Valli Herman and Valli Herman,Los Angeles Daily News | October 18, 1990
Something was aflutter under those darkly lashed eyes. A new style in faces was flashing from the pages of major magazines. But it looked familiar, particularly to anyone who remembered the makeup of the '60s.Supermodel Claudia Schiffer, in her ads for Guess? jeans, launched a hair and makeup look that has thrilled eyeliner fans of all ages.It wasn't just her Brigitte Bardot look-alike features that signaled a new era in beauty trends. It was the pout of paler lips and the tousled, teased twist of a hairdo that gave momentum to the retro chic appearing in major fashion magazine editorials and advertisements and on fashion leaders.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | February 18, 2007
Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake, 36, is serious about tackling the city's important issues like property taxes and helping neighborhoods and schools. But she's also serious about buying pointy-toed shoes on eBay, choosing the right eyeliner and making a great meal for her family. "When you spend your days dealing with problems, it's nice to have some fluff," says the 36-year-old Baltimore native, who was elected council president last month. We agree. Seriously. 1. A super-nanny "With my 3-year-old [Sophia]
NEWS
By Susan Ager | January 31, 1994
THE newspaper ad for Cosmopolitan magazine displays a nymph-like woman lying on the floor. Her sleeveless dress is four inches above her knee. Her left breast is half-bared.She says: "I came back to the office after getting a beauty make-over and a coworker made a weird comment. She said trying to look good was antifeminist. Is there any reason a girl can't be smart, serious and wear eyeliner?"What's wrong with this picture? What's wrong is that this woman calls herself a girl but looks like a babe -- or what we used to call a sexpot.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | February 18, 2007
Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake, 36, is serious about tackling the city's important issues like property taxes and helping neighborhoods and schools. But she's also serious about buying pointy-toed shoes on eBay, choosing the right eyeliner and making a great meal for her family. "When you spend your days dealing with problems, it's nice to have some fluff," says the 36-year-old Baltimore native, who was elected council president last month. We agree. Seriously. 1. A super-nanny "With my 3-year-old [Sophia]
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | May 22, 2008
Aclassic case of putting lip gloss and eyeliner on a warthog was when the NFL rechristened exhibition games as "preseason" games, thus somehow elevating them in significance. And this Orwellian spin on games that don't count became part of the hazy but lucrative rationale for packaging them with season tickets and extorting fans for full-price admission. So it was interesting to hear NFL commissioner Roger Goodell spell out his own thoughts on increasing the regular season to 17 games by eliminating one preseason game.
FEATURES
By Gwen Salley-Schoen and Gwen Salley-Schoen,McClatchy News Service | February 12, 1992
As the fashion pendulum swings back and forth from androgynous to voluptuous, hair and cosmetic trends are drawn into the momentum. Cosmeticians and hairdressers scramble to adjust their art to the newest trends.For spring '92, fashion has gone back to the boudoir with a definite feminine twist. Lace slip dresses are the hottest thing going for spring. Add pretty bras and camisoles that are meant to show, along with hosiery in seductive patterns and eye-catching colors, and it's no wonder that hair styles and makeup are beginning to take on a boudoir look as well.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | March 4, 2001
Spring has two faces. Hard-core fashion crowds will be making themselves up '80s style, while play-it-safers will opt for a classic, fresh look. If you're seeking a Cyndi-Lauper-inspired visage, you'll want to load on the glittery eye shadow, nonblack mascara and thick eyeliner. "It's all about fun," said Molly Nover, Sephora.com beauty editor. "There's lots of color, lots of bold liner, which we really haven't seen all that often. The must-have item for everyone will be eyeliner -- black, colored, liquid or pencil."
FEATURES
By the Intrepid Commuter | May 1, 1994
The driver's lips curled like a bass clef.The broad smile, oblivious to the world, left a lasting impression on Marc Guerrasio. Months have passed since that fateful evening and some details have faded from his mind, but the smile lingers on like some haunting old tune.Mr. Guerrasio never heard a sound -- surrounded as he was by six lanes of highway traffic -- but that beaming grin was a veritable grand finale of some spirited performance by Perlman, Midori, Heifetz, or, or, or . . .The violinist in the gray Honda Civic.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 21, 2005
Everything about Cheaper by the Dozen 2 is applied with a trowel. The sentiment, the cuteness, the macho silliness, the family bonding, even poor Hilary Duff's makeup (someone take away this girl's black eyeliner, pronto!). This movie is one huge pile-on, with everyone in the audience feeling like the poor unfortunate at the bottom of the pile. What can you say about a film where Carmen Electra's performance is one of the high points? Cheaper by the Dozen 2 (20th Century Fox) Starring Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt, Eugene Levy.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | March 4, 2001
Spring has two faces. Hard-core fashion crowds will be making themselves up '80s style, while play-it-safers will opt for a classic, fresh look. If you're seeking a Cyndi-Lauper-inspired visage, you'll want to load on the glittery eye shadow, nonblack mascara and thick eyeliner. "It's all about fun," said Molly Nover, Sephora.com beauty editor. "There's lots of color, lots of bold liner, which we really haven't seen all that often. The must-have item for everyone will be eyeliner -- black, colored, liquid or pencil."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | September 3, 2000
Even makeup maven Bobbi Brown had a hard time as a teen-ager, feeling inadequate and "unpretty" compared with the popular tall, blond girls in her school. In fact, Brown remembers the feelings of insecurity so well that she decided to help teen-age girls today. She recently published "Bobbi Brown Teenage Beauty: Everything You Need To Look Pretty, Natural, Sexy and Awesome," (Harper Collins, $25). The hardcover book, written with Annemarie Iverson, features not only chatty chapters dispensing makeup tips and hairstyling advice but also sections where Brown and celebrities like Brooke Shields and Martha Stewart talk about their own awkward teenhoods.
FEATURES
By the Intrepid Commuter | May 1, 1994
The driver's lips curled like a bass clef.The broad smile, oblivious to the world, left a lasting impression on Marc Guerrasio. Months have passed since that fateful evening and some details have faded from his mind, but the smile lingers on like some haunting old tune.Mr. Guerrasio never heard a sound -- surrounded as he was by six lanes of highway traffic -- but that beaming grin was a veritable grand finale of some spirited performance by Perlman, Midori, Heifetz, or, or, or . . .The violinist in the gray Honda Civic.
NEWS
By Susan Ager | January 31, 1994
THE newspaper ad for Cosmopolitan magazine displays a nymph-like woman lying on the floor. Her sleeveless dress is four inches above her knee. Her left breast is half-bared.She says: "I came back to the office after getting a beauty make-over and a coworker made a weird comment. She said trying to look good was antifeminist. Is there any reason a girl can't be smart, serious and wear eyeliner?"What's wrong with this picture? What's wrong is that this woman calls herself a girl but looks like a babe -- or what we used to call a sexpot.
FEATURES
By Gwen Salley-Schoen and Gwen Salley-Schoen,McClatchy News Service | February 12, 1992
As the fashion pendulum swings back and forth from androgynous to voluptuous, hair and cosmetic trends are drawn into the momentum. Cosmeticians and hairdressers scramble to adjust their art to the newest trends.For spring '92, fashion has gone back to the boudoir with a definite feminine twist. Lace slip dresses are the hottest thing going for spring. Add pretty bras and camisoles that are meant to show, along with hosiery in seductive patterns and eye-catching colors, and it's no wonder that hair styles and makeup are beginning to take on a boudoir look as well.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | September 3, 2000
Even makeup maven Bobbi Brown had a hard time as a teen-ager, feeling inadequate and "unpretty" compared with the popular tall, blond girls in her school. In fact, Brown remembers the feelings of insecurity so well that she decided to help teen-age girls today. She recently published "Bobbi Brown Teenage Beauty: Everything You Need To Look Pretty, Natural, Sexy and Awesome," (Harper Collins, $25). The hardcover book, written with Annemarie Iverson, features not only chatty chapters dispensing makeup tips and hairstyling advice but also sections where Brown and celebrities like Brooke Shields and Martha Stewart talk about their own awkward teenhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Carpenter and By Susan Carpenter,Los Angeles Times | April 7, 2005
Much has happened in the years since Duran Duran ushered in the '80s and the so-called new romantic era with the group's pretty-boy dance rock. Since conquering the world with its breakthrough hit "Planet Earth," the group and its synthetic sound have been successively replaced by hair metal, grunge and hip-hop. Yet throughout it all, one thing's remained the same: the group's die-hard devotees, or Duranies. A bona fide phenom circa 1982, Duraniacs, as they were then called, aren't as demonstrative today as they were when they blasted cassettes of "Girls on Film" from their boom boxes, dancing along in sleeveless concert T-shirts.
FEATURES
By Valli Herman and Valli Herman,Los Angeles Daily News | October 18, 1990
Something was aflutter under those darkly lashed eyes. A new style in faces was flashing from the pages of major magazines. But it looked familiar, particularly to anyone who remembered the makeup of the '60s.Supermodel Claudia Schiffer, in her ads for Guess? jeans, launched a hair and makeup look that has thrilled eyeliner fans of all ages.It wasn't just her Brigitte Bardot look-alike features that signaled a new era in beauty trends. It was the pout of paler lips and the tousled, teased twist of a hairdo that gave momentum to the retro chic appearing in major fashion magazine editorials and advertisements and on fashion leaders.
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