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By Kevin Cowherd | June 8, 2000
FROM ALL indications, there are only about a dozen people in the entire United States who haven't had laser vision correction surgery, me being one of them. A friend of mine just had it done and she keeps chirping: "It's great! I can see! And they don't even give you anesthesia!" Which to me is not exactly a good thing. Look, if they're shooting lasers into my eyes, I want anesthesia, OK? I want to be out like someone whacked me over the head with a shovel. Either that or I want an open bar in the waiting room.
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BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 24, 2005
DETROIT - The wide world of frequent-flier miles just got bigger. Sure, Northwest Airlines Inc.'s frequent fliers can accumulate miles when they buy electronics or clothes online or when they charge a purchase to a WorldPerks credit card. They can even earn points by refinancing a mortgage or getting a loan. Now add laser eye surgery to that list. In what could be the first time frequent-flier miles have been offered with a medical procedure, D.O.C Optics Corp. and Northwest are offering 20,000 miles to patients who undergo laser eye surgery at D.O.C's new laser center in Royal Oak, Mich.
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TOPIC
By Morton F. Goldberg, M.D | April 30, 2000
IMAGINE YOURSELF as a young eye doctor in Baltimore, early in the last century. You treat various types of eye problems with some slight success, including lid infections and eye trauma suffered by the city's mill laborers, dock workers, and barroom brawlers. But many of the cases you see present mysteries for which little explanation -- and no medication -- is available. When you perform surgeries, you use large surgical tools and perhaps a magnifying glass. Afterwards your patients stay in the hospital for two to three weeks, with sandbags placed around their heads to ensure that they remain still.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
BETHESDA -- Midshipman Graham MacDonald zips around in a sports car. He plunges down mountains on a snowboard. And he surfs monster waves after hurricanes. But because his vision was too lousy to make out even the big "E" on an eye chart, the Naval Academy junior resigned himself to a job aboard surface ships, plodding vessels that offer as much driving excitement as the Goodyear blimp. Then MacDonald's career prospects took a hairpin turn. At the National Naval Medical Center here one recent Thursday, a doctor fired a laser beam into his eyes and then said words that were like a purring jet engine to his ears: "You have pilot's vision now."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | September 16, 1992
The inherent risk of being a professional boxer is a topic veteran trainer Adrian Davis of Laurel preaches with firsthand knowledge to his fighting sons, Victor and Demetrius, who are middleweights.A hard-punching welterweight contender in the 1970s, Adrian, who once fought three main events in a 10-day span, began to suffer blurred vision and ultimately lost the sight in his left eye."I was a victim of non-technology," he said. "I wound up with eight holes in my retina. If they had been performing laser-beam surgery back then, I probably would have kept my sight and continued fighting."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
University of Maryland eye doctors said yesterday that they will use mobile lasers to offer vision correction at sites around Baltimore in partnership with a Colorado firm. The Maryland Center for Eye Care, the ophthalmology faculty practice group of the University of Maryland Medical Center, will provide the surgeons, while Colorado-based ClearVision Laser Centers will own the lasers and provide the technicians. "Instead of owning five or six lasers, we buy one or two and move them," said Michael E. Bjoro, senior administrator for the department of ophthalmology.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 1999
Former junior middleweight champion Vincent Pettway of Baltimore has withdrawn from his scheduled International Boxing Federation welterweight title bout against champion Felix Trinidad in Puerto Rico on May 29 after undergoing surgery Wednesday to repair a detached retina in his left eye. This is the second time an injury has cost Pettway, 33, a chance to challenge the unbeaten Trinidad, who has been looking ahead to a more lucrative showdown this...
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | March 11, 1991
When Andreas Rossos had his cataract removed, he was operated on by a Russian surgeon on a hospital ship that was staffed by 300 eye specialists and moored off his native Cyprus.But when the 66-year-old tourism industry tycoon developed chronic retinal problems that threatened his sight, he headed straight for America and Baltimore.Here he would get the best treatment, he was assured. That assurance came not only from surgeons in Moscow but also by a prominent urologist in Cyprus, Dr. George Pipis, and his wife, Stallo.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1998
POTOMAC -- Fred Funk figured he had nothing to lose. He was already in the midst of one of his most disappointing seasons in a decade on the PGA Tour. He was about to play in a tournament, the $2 million Kemper Open, in which he had missed the cut the last three years and had never been in the hunt.So Funk paid a visit to the doctor Tuesday afternoon.Not a swing doctor or a sports psychologist, but Dr. Mark Whitten, a local eye surgeon who performed laser surgery on Funk in his Rockville office and sent the 41-year-old golfer back to the TPC at Avenel having corrected his vision from 20/600 to 20/25.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 24, 2005
DETROIT - The wide world of frequent-flier miles just got bigger. Sure, Northwest Airlines Inc.'s frequent fliers can accumulate miles when they buy electronics or clothes online or when they charge a purchase to a WorldPerks credit card. They can even earn points by refinancing a mortgage or getting a loan. Now add laser eye surgery to that list. In what could be the first time frequent-flier miles have been offered with a medical procedure, D.O.C Optics Corp. and Northwest are offering 20,000 miles to patients who undergo laser eye surgery at D.O.C's new laser center in Royal Oak, Mich.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2002
Every morning Linda Shope makes herself an optical sandwich. She puts in her soft contact lenses, inserts hard contacts on top of them, then dons a pair of tinted eyeglasses. And she still can't see well enough to drive a car or write a check. "I'm hoping I can have a cornea transplant," says Shope, 53, of Waldorf. "What hurts is my whole life has turned upside down." In June 1998, Shope heard a radio commercial extolling the virtues of Lasik eye surgery: Throw away your glasses and contacts -- forever!
TOPIC
By Paul Wenske | February 11, 2001
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A year ago Martha Gershun thought it would be great to ditch her glasses and, like a million other people, have her eyeballs sculpted to improve her vision. Now she's seeing red. "It was a whim. I thought it would be cool," she said. A friend encouraged her. And TV ads implied near-perfect sight. But a year later, Gershun is angry. Her eyes are so dry and painful all the time that she can't read to her daughter at night. "Having refractive eye surgery was probably the worst decision of my life," said the president and chief executive of BizSpace, a local Internet publishing company.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 8, 2000
FROM ALL indications, there are only about a dozen people in the entire United States who haven't had laser vision correction surgery, me being one of them. A friend of mine just had it done and she keeps chirping: "It's great! I can see! And they don't even give you anesthesia!" Which to me is not exactly a good thing. Look, if they're shooting lasers into my eyes, I want anesthesia, OK? I want to be out like someone whacked me over the head with a shovel. Either that or I want an open bar in the waiting room.
TOPIC
By Morton F. Goldberg, M.D | April 30, 2000
IMAGINE YOURSELF as a young eye doctor in Baltimore, early in the last century. You treat various types of eye problems with some slight success, including lid infections and eye trauma suffered by the city's mill laborers, dock workers, and barroom brawlers. But many of the cases you see present mysteries for which little explanation -- and no medication -- is available. When you perform surgeries, you use large surgical tools and perhaps a magnifying glass. Afterwards your patients stay in the hospital for two to three weeks, with sandbags placed around their heads to ensure that they remain still.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and By Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2000
Molly Gardner sits up in her surgery bed at Mercy Medical Center and opens her eyes. "Can you see the clock?" asks Dr. Sheri Rowen, her ophthalmologist. "Ten after nine," the Ellicott City resident says with exuberance not usually associated with telling time. Fifteen minutes ago, she needed glasses or contacts to see the clock. Now, after a surgical procedure called phakic IOL, in which Rowen implanted a contact lens behind Gardner's iris, her vision has improved to 20-20. The corrective surgery procedure, currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States, is not yet available commercially.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
Bethesda-based TLC Laser Eye Centers Inc. announced yesterday that professional golfer Tiger Woods will be a spokesman for the company after having corrective vision surgery at one of the centers in the fall. Woods, a longtime wearer of corrective lenses, underwent the 20-minute surgical procedure at the Rockville TLC on Oct. 1. "He went out that following weekend and won a tournament," said Jay Van Vechten, president of Van Vechten & Co., the Boca Raton, Fla., public relations firm representing TLC. "You hear this testimonial stuff all the time, but when you hear it from the mouth of a Tiger Woods, it makes you sit up and take notice.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
BETHESDA -- Midshipman Graham MacDonald zips around in a sports car. He plunges down mountains on a snowboard. And he surfs monster waves after hurricanes. But because his vision was too lousy to make out even the big "E" on an eye chart, the Naval Academy junior resigned himself to a job aboard surface ships, plodding vessels that offer as much driving excitement as the Goodyear blimp. Then MacDonald's career prospects took a hairpin turn. At the National Naval Medical Center here one recent Thursday, a doctor fired a laser beam into his eyes and then said words that were like a purring jet engine to his ears: "You have pilot's vision now."
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and By Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2000
Molly Gardner sits up in her surgery bed at Mercy Medical Center and opens her eyes. "Can you see the clock?" asks Dr. Sheri Rowen, her ophthalmologist. "Ten after nine," the Ellicott City resident says with exuberance not usually associated with telling time. Fifteen minutes ago, she needed glasses or contacts to see the clock. Now, after a surgical procedure called phakic IOL, in which Rowen implanted a contact lens behind Gardner's iris, her vision has improved to 20-20. The corrective surgery procedure, currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States, is not yet available commercially.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
University of Maryland eye doctors said yesterday that they will use mobile lasers to offer vision correction at sites around Baltimore in partnership with a Colorado firm. The Maryland Center for Eye Care, the ophthalmology faculty practice group of the University of Maryland Medical Center, will provide the surgeons, while Colorado-based ClearVision Laser Centers will own the lasers and provide the technicians. "Instead of owning five or six lasers, we buy one or two and move them," said Michael E. Bjoro, senior administrator for the department of ophthalmology.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 1999
Former junior middleweight champion Vincent Pettway of Baltimore has withdrawn from his scheduled International Boxing Federation welterweight title bout against champion Felix Trinidad in Puerto Rico on May 29 after undergoing surgery Wednesday to repair a detached retina in his left eye. This is the second time an injury has cost Pettway, 33, a chance to challenge the unbeaten Trinidad, who has been looking ahead to a more lucrative showdown this...
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