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NEWS
By ELLEN KABCENELL WAYNE AND MICHAEL HAYES | October 12, 2005
I recently joined a non- profit medical professional association as an intern. I have since been diagnosed with a chronic eye disease that requires vigilant management. I miss two days of work every two months and I do not receive paid time off. I interpret my employer's silence as lack of interest in pursuing permanent employment, although the boss responded two months ago that he is working on it. At what point should I inform a potential employer that I must be off work every two months for treatments?
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2012
When Tamika Morgan developed red irritated eyes in the fall of 2010, she wasted no time heading to an optometrist at a local retail store who gave her drops for pink eye. Her eyes got worse over the next few days so she went to a local hospital to see an ophthalmologist, but a specialist wasn't available. A weekend passed and she landed in the office of a retina expert at another hospital, and by then she couldn't read the big E on the vision chart. She was legally blind. Dr. Lisa Schocket, the retina specialist at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital's Eye Center, suspected Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, a rare disease that can turn a patient's hair and skin white in addition to hampering hearing and sight.
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SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | May 3, 2000
In an article in Wednesday's editions, The Sun reported that Orioles radio announcer Chuck Thompson was undergoing "new, experimental therapy" to treat the eye disease macular degeneration. When Thompson's treatment began earlier this year, the therapy was permitted as part of an experimental study. Since then, on April 12, the Food and Drug Administration approved verteporfin, the drug involved in the therapy, making it no longer experimental. Chuck Thompson, the voice of Orioles baseball and Colts football for generations of Marylanders, is undergoing treatment for an optical disease that could bring to a close his broadcasting career.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | March 15, 2010
Dr. Arnall Patz, a Johns Hopkins physician who discovered and eliminated a major cause of blindness in children, died Thursday of heart disease at his Pikesville home. He was 89. The director emeritus of the Wilmer Eye Institute, he was considered a pivotal figure in the history of ophthalmology. His work won him a Presidential Medal of Freedom and an Albert Lasker Award for his research into the causes and prevention of blindness. He was presented awards by President George W. Bush and Helen Keller.
FEATURES
By Richard Saltus and Richard Saltus,BOSTON GLOBE | October 14, 1997
In yesterday's Today section, the location of the headquarters of The Foundation Fighting Blindness was misidentified. The foundation is in Hunt Valley.The Sun regrets the error.For the 6 million older Americans whose vision is being threatened or destroyed by a disease called macular degeneration, and for the doctors who have long been frustrated in their efforts to treat it, last month brought a rare dose of good news.Researchers from the National Cancer Institute in Frederick and three other institutions reported in the journal Science that they had found a cluster of genetic mutations that appear to cause about one-sixth of all age-related macular degeneration, or AMD. The mutations all affect the same gene, which the researchers were able to pinpoint.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | March 15, 2010
Dr. Arnall Patz, a Johns Hopkins physician who discovered and eliminated a major cause of blindness in children, died Thursday of heart disease at his Pikesville home. He was 89. The director emeritus of the Wilmer Eye Institute, he was considered a pivotal figure in the history of ophthalmology. His work won him a Presidential Medal of Freedom and an Albert Lasker Award for his research into the causes and prevention of blindness. He was presented awards by President George W. Bush and Helen Keller.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | October 27, 1992
Q: I have read about the benefits of aspirin for the prevention of heart attacks but have hesitated to take it regularly because of my diabetes. Is aspirin safe in people with diabetes?A: A study of 3,711 diabetic patients between the ages of 18 and 70 found that daily aspirin, compared with a placebo, produced a small but significant decrease in the frequency of fatal and non-fatal heart attacks over a five- to seven-year period. There was no difference between the two groups in the overall death rate.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2012
When Tamika Morgan developed red irritated eyes in the fall of 2010, she wasted no time heading to an optometrist at a local retail store who gave her drops for pink eye. Her eyes got worse over the next few days so she went to a local hospital to see an ophthalmologist, but a specialist wasn't available. A weekend passed and she landed in the office of a retina expert at another hospital, and by then she couldn't read the big E on the vision chart. She was legally blind. Dr. Lisa Schocket, the retina specialist at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital's Eye Center, suspected Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, a rare disease that can turn a patient's hair and skin white in addition to hampering hearing and sight.
FEATURES
August 23, 2007
Researchers have identified two mutant forms of a single gene that are responsible for 99 percent of all cases of a common form of glaucoma, which is second only to cataracts as the leading cause of blindness in the world. The genes cause a specific form of the disease called "exfoliative glaucoma," characterized by the buildup of a protein called elastin in the ducts that drain excess fluid from the eye. The subsequent buildup of fluid causes pressure on the optic nerve, eventually leading to blindness.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. -- A newly developed laser technique being tested at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore could open the way to therapy for a previously untreatable eye disease that afflicts millions of elderly people.Until recently, laser therapy was used to treat only select cases of the disease, "occult" macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in people over age 65. More than 75 percent ofpatients who suffer a hidden form of the disease could not be helped.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | July 31, 2008
Glaucoma, a disease of the optic nerve that, left untreated, can cause blindness, occurs in approximately 1 percent to 2 percent of the population over the age of 40, says Dr. Donald Abrams, chief of Sinai Hospital's Department of Ophthalmology based at the Krieger Eye Institute. However, in some populations, such as among African-Americans, the disease occurs more frequently; and in some age groups, it can occur in 6 percent to 10 percent of the population. But the disease often goes undiscovered - and untreated.
FEATURES
August 23, 2007
Researchers have identified two mutant forms of a single gene that are responsible for 99 percent of all cases of a common form of glaucoma, which is second only to cataracts as the leading cause of blindness in the world. The genes cause a specific form of the disease called "exfoliative glaucoma," characterized by the buildup of a protein called elastin in the ducts that drain excess fluid from the eye. The subsequent buildup of fluid causes pressure on the optic nerve, eventually leading to blindness.
NEWS
By ELLEN KABCENELL WAYNE AND MICHAEL HAYES | October 12, 2005
I recently joined a non- profit medical professional association as an intern. I have since been diagnosed with a chronic eye disease that requires vigilant management. I miss two days of work every two months and I do not receive paid time off. I interpret my employer's silence as lack of interest in pursuing permanent employment, although the boss responded two months ago that he is working on it. At what point should I inform a potential employer that I must be off work every two months for treatments?
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2002
EntreMed Inc., best known for its experimental anti-cancer drugs, said yesterday that it signed a deal worth up to $41 million with a California company to use one of those drugs to treat eye diseases. Under the agreement, Allergan Inc. of Irvine, Calif., first will explore developing an implantable treatment for age-related macular degeneration, a disease characterized by bleeding in the eyes, using EntreMed's drug Panzem. Panzem is in the second of three stages of human testing as an anti-cancer drug designed to fight tumors by blocking their blood supply.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | May 3, 2000
In an article in Wednesday's editions, The Sun reported that Orioles radio announcer Chuck Thompson was undergoing "new, experimental therapy" to treat the eye disease macular degeneration. When Thompson's treatment began earlier this year, the therapy was permitted as part of an experimental study. Since then, on April 12, the Food and Drug Administration approved verteporfin, the drug involved in the therapy, making it no longer experimental. Chuck Thompson, the voice of Orioles baseball and Colts football for generations of Marylanders, is undergoing treatment for an optical disease that could bring to a close his broadcasting career.
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2000
JEFF CLEVELAND IS certainly not one to run away from a problem. Instead, he runs for a solution. The Ellicott City resident and his 9-year-old daughter, Megan, have been diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an eye disease that causes degeneration of the retina and can lead to blindness. The condition is hereditary; Cleveland's father and grandfather suffered from RP and experienced progressive loss of vision. His grandfather eventually became legally blind. So far, Cleveland has experienced only slight visual impairment, and Megan, a fourth-grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, has suffered no significant loss of vision.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. -- A newly developed laser technique being tested at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore could open the way to therapy for a previously untreatable eye disease that afflicts millions of elderly people.Until recently, laser therapy was used to treat only select cases of the disease, "occult" macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in people over age 65.More than 75 percent of patients who suffer a hidden form of the disease could not be helped.
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2000
JEFF CLEVELAND IS certainly not one to run away from a problem. Instead, he runs for a solution. The Ellicott City resident and his 9-year-old daughter, Megan, have been diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an eye disease that causes degeneration of the retina and can lead to blindness. The condition is hereditary; Cleveland's father and grandfather suffered from RP and experienced progressive loss of vision. His grandfather eventually became legally blind. So far, Cleveland has experienced only slight visual impairment, and Megan, a fourth-grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, has suffered no significant loss of vision.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1998
Dr. Alfred Edward Maumenee Jr., a world renowned ophthalmologist and former director of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital, died in his sleep Sunday at his home in Port Clear, Ala. He was 84.Dr. Maumenee was considered both a pioneer in the treatment and prevention of eye disease and the foremost corneal transplant and cataract surgeon in the world, according to colleagues.In a career that spanned more than 50 years, he managed to touch every facet of ophthalmology. He made significant discoveries in the detection and treatment of retinal malfunctions, macular degeneration and several other eye diseases including glaucoma, the leading cause of blindness.
FEATURES
By Richard Saltus and Richard Saltus,BOSTON GLOBE | October 14, 1997
In yesterday's Today section, the location of the headquarters of The Foundation Fighting Blindness was misidentified. The foundation is in Hunt Valley.The Sun regrets the error.For the 6 million older Americans whose vision is being threatened or destroyed by a disease called macular degeneration, and for the doctors who have long been frustrated in their efforts to treat it, last month brought a rare dose of good news.Researchers from the National Cancer Institute in Frederick and three other institutions reported in the journal Science that they had found a cluster of genetic mutations that appear to cause about one-sixth of all age-related macular degeneration, or AMD. The mutations all affect the same gene, which the researchers were able to pinpoint.
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