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NEWS
February 14, 2011
In response to the article in today's newspaper ( "A slow death," Feb. 13), I hope that Gov. Martin O'Malley never has to experience having a loved one brutally murdered and watch as justice system does nothing to punish the monster who killed them. How much does our country pay to keep an individual on death row year after year? Why should they receive three meals a day when there are starving, homeless people who have nothing? I know as a humane nation we must treat the human race in a humane way, but how about how the murder victims were treated?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While Maryland health officials urged caregivers this week to be alert for possible Ebola virus cases, they were also quick to emphasize there are other — perhaps more contagious — pathogens that they are also monitoring. Public health officials around the world remain on watch for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, while the United States is on guard for enterovirus D68 cases among children. As flu season begins, surveillance for that illness is resuming, and other potentially deadly threats such as avian flu lurk, as well.
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NEWS
April 6, 2013
I have looked over that Mercatus Center report on freedom in the 50 states ("The 'Free State' isn't so free anymore," April 3). I suspect that the majority of Marylanders would rather live in any of 17 or so of the 20 "least free" states than in any of most of the top 20 "most free" states. However, if you are a Fox News addict, you might feel differently. James Weston, Baltimore
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A Columbia-based real estate developer wants to build four glassy office buildings on its waterfront property in Canton, a project that could create a kind of Harbor farther East. Corporate Office Properties Trust's proposal calls for shopping, restaurants and four buildings with about 250,000 square feet of offices on top of several stories of parking, said Stephen Budorick, the real estate investment trust's executive vice president and chief operating officer. The company has no time frame for when the project could begin because it is seeking tenants before committing to construction, Budorick said.
NEWS
April 10, 2012
The great idea proffered by The Sun that everyone should agree between now and November to engage in a genuine debate about issues of importance cracked me up ("Obama and judicial review," April 6). This "suggestion" coming from The Sun, perhaps one of the worst perpetrators of race-baiting and fake victimization, was disgusting and totally disingenuous. I suggest the newspaper clean up its own house before offering, to it's readers, such "sage" advice on how to behave. Gail Householder, Marriottsville
EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
I read the Jan. 31 edition of the Flier and found some eye-opening information. Michael McCall's Inner Arbor Plan is called new: however, it is almost identical to the General Growth Properties Plan for the Columbia Association's Symphony Woods open space/parkland property that was approved by the County Council in 2010 legislation. The orientation and entry point to Symphony Woods seem to be the only major changes. Is it surprising then that the three Council members representing Columbia indicated they love this "new" plan?
NEWS
By STAN STOVALL and STAN STOVALL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
Why me? That was my first thought upon learning that I had glaucoma, a disease that steals your vision. I had already lost most of the sight in my left eye and the damage was irreversible. I was in danger of losing the sight in my right eye, as well. "How could this be?" I asked myself. I had always prided myself on being the picture of perfect health. I ate right, was obsessed with exercise, took loads of vitamin supplements, and was a bodybuilding and weight-lifting champion. I felt great, felt no eye pain, and didn't really notice any difficulty in doing my job as a television news anchor, which, of course, requires lots of reading, both on-camera and off. But that's the tricky part about glaucoma.
NEWS
October 12, 2005
A couple of scientific breakthroughs recently caught our eye - because, in the end, they all hit close to home. First, wild gorillas were documented using a branch as a walking stick to ford a small pool. Previously, they had not been observed using tools, and so this advertised more clearly their evolutionary link to man. Second, a recently discovered planet - dubbed Xena and possibly our solar system's 10th planet - turns out to have its own moon, orbiting much like the moon circles the Earth.
HEALTH
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Sarita Murray looks younger than her 44 years. She greeted visitors to her Northwest Baltimore home on a recent afternoon wearing a short black tutu, oversized pearls around her neck and a fitted white T-shirt bearing an image of a woman's eye made up in shimmery pink shades, much like Murray's on this day. The eye is the logo for her breast cancer awareness group, Blink Pink, launched a year ago. Stacked boxes of pink confetti competed...
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | August 4, 2012
Ed Dickson had an abbreviated practice Saturday, but it wasn't his choice. The Ravens tight end said he was poked in his right eye by a teammate during a red-zone exercise early in the session at M&T Bank Stadium. “I thought I would be good, but my vision was kind of impaired,” he said. “So they took me out as a precaution.” Dickson's eye was red as he spoke in the locker room after practice. Dickson said he thought he could return, but his vision became blurry. “I got poked pretty deep in my eye,” he said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - As a disappointing season gave way to a tumultuous offseason earlier this year, Maryland men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon waited anxiously for the start of preseason practice. With an overhauled roster and a new offense, the Terps are scheduled to begin practice Friday as they get ready for their first season in the Big Ten Conference. Maryland, which finished 17-15 in its Atlantic Coast Conference farewell and failed for the fourth straight year to make the NCAA tournament, opens the 2014-15 season Nov. 14 against Wagner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Bushmill Tavern is the restaurant/bar that every neighborhood wishes it had. There's nothing fancy about the place, from the bare bones decor to the burger-centric menu, but thanks to friendly service and a ton of talent in the kitchen, locals could eat at Bushmill every night and never get bored. The Abingdon restaurant opened in February. In May, chef Mark Littleton took over in the kitchen. Littleton, who developed a loyal following in the city during his stints at Annabel Lee Tavern and the now-shuttered Adam's Eve, keeps the menu casual but shows off his cooking chops with top-notch execution and creative touches to standard dishes.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The energy company Dominion said Tuesday that it is exploring developing an alternate evacuation route for some residential neighbors of its proposed Cove Point liquefied natural gas plant, prompting opponents to question anew assertions by the company and federal regulators that the facility poses no significant safety or environmental risks. Karl R. Neddenien, spokesman for the Richmond, Va.-based company, declined to offer details but said Dominion is "looking into" establishing an alternate route for residents living on Cove Point to get away should there be an emergency at the facility.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 27, 2014
Maryland will depend on the usual group of core players to beat Indiana on Saturday in the Terps' first conference game as a member of the Big Ten. But Maryland could have to lean heavily on some young and previously under-the-radar players as well. Here are four to keep an eye on: Redshirt freshman outside linebacker Jalen Brooks Brooks started in place of senior Matt Robinson against Syracuse last week and will start again if Robinson is unable to play against Indiana.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The photos of author Robert Timberg in recent years aren't as horrifying as his memoir leads readers to expect. His eyes are direct and unflinching, and his mouth expresses wry amusement. He has the kind of wrinkles normally found on a 74-year-old man and a patch of skin across his nose that at a casual glance appears sunburned. There's nothing about Timberg's appearance now that could be described as freakish, nothing that would cause young children to howl in fright. It's taken Timberg more than 35 operations - including one without anesthesia - and 47 years to achieve that face, and he's still not entirely reconciled to it. There are moments even now when he looks in the mirror and is first startled, then furious.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
In response to the Federal Emergency Management Agency's decision to deny flood benefits to Eastern Shore communities, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman said that "we cannot forget those impacted by Hurricane Sandy" ("Inspectors to evaluate Eastern Shore homes, businesses for Sandy damage," Dec. 8). We also shouldn't forget that there's a gubernatorial election in 2014 - an election in which Mr. Ulman is probably going to seek the Democratic Party nomination. That may explain why he's opining on something so removed from his official duties in Howard County.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | December 19, 1991
THE BOGEYMAN of privacy zealots was powerfully evoked in a single sentence in George Orwell's "1984": "Big Brother is watching you." It was the idea that soon we would all be under the constant watchful eye of government, our every move cataloged.We still sometimes feel this keenly, when we discover that there is an FBI file on someone we know, or when we receive a report from a credit agency and see a late payment on a car loan from 1986 duly noted.What we never expected was turnabout, and yet that is what we have seen in the last year.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Maryland is in the running for a data storage center with its own sizable power plant, a project planned for the University of Delaware until officials there spiked it amid an uproar over its scale and potential effect on the community. The Data Centers LLC said it's looking in Cecil County and elsewhere in Maryland as well as in Delaware and five other states. The company, which goes by TDC, eventually hopes to build two to three of the projects a year. Now, though, TDC is hunting for land for its inaugural project — which has proved harder to launch than the Pennsylvania firm anticipated.
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