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NEWS
By GAR ALPEROVITZ | February 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It's nearly impossible for the average citizen to grasp the scale of ExxonMobil Corp.'s huge profits. In the quarter ended Dec. 31, the giant company made $10.7 billion, the equivalent of more than $115 million for every one of its 92 days, nearly $5 million each hour, more than $80,000 every minute, nearly $1,350 each second. ExxonMobil's overall 2005 revenues of $371 billion amounted to more than $1 billion a day! The total was larger than the entire economies of all but 16 of the 184 countries ranked by the World Bank.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | January 10, 2009
A maintenance supervisor for Exxon Mobil Corp. said yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court that he did not know how to operate a device that should have prevented a massive gasoline leak three years ago at a service station in Jacksonville. The underground leak dumped more than 26,000 gallons of regular unleaded gasoline into the groundwater that supplied the area's wells and ruined property values for some 300 homeowners, who are seeking at least $1 billion from the oil giant. The trial began in October, and the plaintiffs are still presenting their case to the jury.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | March 2, 2006
State officials ordered tests yesterday on more residential wells in the Jacksonville area of Baltimore County after gasoline turned up unexpectedly in the water of a bank northeast of an Exxon service station where a 25,000-gallon fuel leak was reported nearly two weeks ago. Herbert M. Meade, chief of oil control for the Maryland Department of the Environment, said he ordered the testing of about 20 residential wells northeast of the Exxon station because...
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Maryland's highest court on Tuesday struck down the bulk of a fraud case against ExxonMobil Corp. stemming from an underground gasoline leak in Baltimore County, reversing most of $1.65 billion in judgments and dealing a stunning blow to hundreds of families. In two opinions on cases arising from the 26,000 gallon spill in Jacksonville in 2006, the Court of Appeals tossed out claims of fraud and ruled that plaintiffs could not collect for emotional distress or the cost of medical care to monitor possible symptoms of illness.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | February 24, 2009
At the beginning of a closing statement that he predicted would last the better part of two days, a lawyer representing 300 plaintiffs who are suing ExxonMobil Corp. said yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court that their community was "forever changed" by a huge gasoline leak three years ago. The spill, at a service station in Jacksonville, dumped more than 26,000 gallons of regular unleaded gasoline into the groundwater that supplied the area's wells. The plaintiffs, who are seeking at least $1 billion from the oil giant, claim that their physical and emotional health had been damaged and their property values have been ruined.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2006
It's been more than a month since a 25,000-gallon gasoline leak was reported in Jacksonville, and the usually placid northern Baltimore County community remains one big cleanup zone. Black plastic pipes are strung across lawns. Generators rumble, supplying power to the machines that pull gasoline and vapor from the ground. The narrow lanes are jammed with trucks, and helmeted workers in bright yellow vests seem to be everywhere. "It's like we were suddenly invaded by Exxon," says Nanette Odend'hal, who lives at one end of formerly quiet Hampshire Glen Court.
NEWS
April 9, 2011
The individual accounts presented in your retrospective of the gasoline spill fail to adequately encapsulate the unremitting heartache wrought by the over 26,000 gallons of gasoline that leaked undetected for a month below the Jacksonville Exxon in early 2006 ("Five years later, Jacksonville still grapples with gas spill," April 6). I have spent much of the last five years visiting with friends and neighbors in the community, haggling with ExxonMobil and the Maryland Department of the Environment over well testing and an array of remediation efforts.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | January 30, 2013
Safeway Inc. has launched a gas rewards program with ExxonMobil. Grocery customers can earn points for most items at Safeway stores in the Mid-Atlantic and redeem the points at the pump at participating Exxon and Mobil stations, the supermarket chain is announcing today. "By teaming up with ExxonMobil, we're able to thank our customers with a loyalty program that makes two frequent and critical purchases lead to real savings," Mir Aamir, Safeway's president of customer loyalty, said in a statement.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER AND LAURA BARNHARDT and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER AND LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTERS | March 10, 2006
Maryland's top environmental official pledged yesterday to impose stiff penalties on ExxonMobil Corp. and to tighten regulatory controls on service stations throughout the state in the wake of a 25,000-gallon gasoline leak in the Jacksonville area of Baltimore County. At a news conference across from the Exxon station where the leak occurred, Kendl P. Philbrick, secretary of the state Department of the Environment, called the Jacksonville leak "catastrophic" and announced that he is ordering immediate checks of leak detection systems by all 3,500 regulated fuel tank owners in the state, to be followed by new emergency regulations that would enhance efforts to catch leaks quickly.
NEWS
December 10, 1998
IN THE 25 years since the first Arab oil embargo, no one ever predicted that the price of crude oil would drop to $11 a barrel. Nor did most foresee a merger between two oil giants such as Exxon and Mobil. Yet both have come to pass.Cheap oil and higher production costs are driving the combination -- and fueling talk of other large mergers, including Monday's reports that Shell is interested in acquiring Chevron.Exploration and production expenses are rising as companies look for oil in remote areas and in deeper water offshore.
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