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Exxon Valdez

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NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | May 2, 1994
VALDEZ, Alaska -- The supertankers come calling, two, sometimes three a day, just as they have for the past 17 years. The sprawling steel giants take on a load of North Slope oil, slip away from their berths at the Alyeska Marine Terminal and slowly nose into Prince William Sound.It's a tight squeeze through the craggy Valdez Narrows, crew members' watchful eyes starboard for icebergs from the Columbia Glacier; a portside turn past Bligh Reef; further to port beyond Naked Island; then a straight shot through Hinchinbrook Entrance and out into the open waters of the Gulf of Alaska.
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BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
As the No. 2 leader of the Coast Guard, Vice Adm. — and Vice Commandant — Sally Brice-O'Hara is the chief operating officer of an organization with a $10 billion budget and 58,000 military and civilian employees, plus 31,000 volunteers. Last week, less than a month before her own retirement, the Annapolis native and 1974 Goucher College graduate was temporarily bumped up a rung to No. 1 while her boss, Adm. Robert Papp, recovered from surgery. Brice-O'Hara has served coast to coast as well as in Hawaii.
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NEWS
By Newsday | June 19, 1994
NEW YORK -- Joseph Hazelwood has been "on the beach," as they say in merchant marine jargon, since the Exxon Valdez crunched up on Bligh Reef in Alaska five years ago. But the captain, blamed again last week for America's worst maritime environmental disaster, still harbors a dream of commanding a large ship again."
NEWS
By Charles Wohlforth | May 6, 2010
Each news update from the BP oil blowout in the Gulf of Mexico tightens a hard knot in my stomach. Alaskans who lived through the Exxon Valdez oil spill feel dark memories resurfacing. We talk about our sadness for the people in the way, people who don't know what's about to hit them. "They still seem to think they'll be able to contain this and stop it, and they just can't," said Rick Steiner, a former University of Alaska fisheries extension agent whose life was irrevocably upset by the Exxon Valdez, which spilled at least 11 million gallons of oil in Prince William Sound 21 years ago. "Not much oil is going to be recovered; they're not going to save much wildlife; they're not going to be able to restore damaged ecosystems."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 1997
NEW YORK -- New York City is using some of the money that Exxon Corp. paid to settle a lawsuit stemming from the Exxon Veldex spill to help clean marshes and wetlands in the city.In March 1989 the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of oil into the pristine waters of Alaska's Prince William Sound, causing one of the worst environmental disasters in history.To settle the resulting lawsuit, filed by Alaska and the federal government - in addition to the $2 billion the company paid for direct cleanup costs - Exxon agreed to pay $900 million to be used for environmental good works around the United States.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1997
Effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill eight years ago in Alaska have trickled into the Westminster area to help protect local waters.A drop of the Exxon Corp.'s settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency will pay for new trees and shrubs along a local stream, Longwell Run, that flows by the Carroll County Office Building.The $12,000 award was announced last week by Maryland Democratic Sens. Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski.Carroll County is in the third year of a five-year project to restore sections of the stream, with most of the work near the County Office Building, said James E. Slater Jr., chief of the county's Bureau of Environmental Services.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2003
Hidden pools of oil left over from the Exxon Valdez spill 14 years ago continued to damage the Alaskan coastal environment for a decade, killing pink salmon eggs and retarding the population growth of sea otters, harlequin ducks and other wildlife, a new study says. The 14-year study published yesterday in the journal Science points out that effects of the 11 million-gallon spill into Prince William Sound extended well beyond the initial deaths of 250,000 oiled seabirds, 2,800 otters and 300 harbor seals.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | February 2, 1993
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- In the genes of fish, in the brains of birds and the livers and kidneys of sea otters, the Exxon Valdez oil spill played havoc. Finally, scientists can talk about it.Herring were born as mutants with twisted spines and deformed jaws.Harlequin ducks quit reproducing.Murres began nesting a month late, meaning their immature offspring are being swept off their cliff-side nests and washed away by the early winter storms.Perfectly preserved, toxic, crude oil remains trapped under mussel beds, in some places more than a half-foot deep.
NEWS
March 25, 1997
HOW THINGS HAVE CHANGED over the past few years for Longwell Run, the tiny stream that meanders through the eastern part of Westminster along Railroad Avenue before reaching the Patapsco River.For a decade, protection of that creek from chemical pollution and refuse dumping was the singular obsession of private citizen Monroe G. Haines, who walked the stream almost daily to look for signs of deterioration. He inspired formation of a volunteer task force four years ago, which then pressed for government action.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 16, 1997
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Pete Kompkoff and the other villagers of Chenega know perfectly well that when the Exxon Valdez hemorrhaged oil onto their shores, it was the crew that was at fault, not the ship.But they are not about to sit back silently in the coming weeks as Exxon Corp. seeks permission in U.S. District Court here for the tanker, renamed the Mediterranean, to return to Prince William Sound, where in 1989 it unleashed one of the nation's worst environmental disasters."It's just like a slap in the face, even though the machine didn't do the damage," said Kompkoff, administrator of the 28-house village tucked onto an island that is one small puzzle piece in the white-and-blue jigsaw of the sparsely populated sound.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | April 30, 2008
No, he didn't! Please tell me that NBA superstar LeBron James didn't refer to himself in the third person while complaining about the brutal treatment he has received from the Washington Wizards in their Eastern Conference playoff series with the Cleveland Cavaliers. "I guess that's what they want to do, hurt LeBron James in this series," he said. "It's not working." Neither is that quote. I understand his frustration. The Wizards, on the brink of elimination going into tonight's Game 5, have been called for two flagrant fouls against James.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | February 28, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Exxon Mobil Corp. made its final appeal yesterday to the Supreme Court to throw out a $2.5 billion verdict against the oil giant for its role in the 1989 spill of 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaska's Prince William Sound. In a 90-minute hearing on the Exxon Valdez case, the company argued that maritime law has little precedent for levying punitive damages against a company for the actions of its agents at sea. The case is unusual in that Exxon based its appeal on maritime law, specifically an 1818 case that holds ship owners aren't liable for their agents at sea unless they're complicit in their behavior.
NEWS
By David Zucchino and David Zucchino,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 5, 2004
NEWARK, Del. - Like a mutant blob in a bad horror movie, an oil slick first thought to be relatively small has grown bigger and more menacing over the past week, oozing its way down both banks of the Delaware River. When the Greek tanker Athos I began leaking heavy Venezuelan crude oil into the river the night of Nov. 26, it appeared to be a manageable spill confined to a riverside terminal - 30,000 gallons, according to estimates. But authorities now are warning that it could be as much as 473,000 gallons, a gooey mess that has stained 70 miles of shoreline across three states.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2003
Hidden pools of oil left over from the Exxon Valdez spill 14 years ago continued to damage the Alaskan coastal environment for a decade, killing pink salmon eggs and retarding the population growth of sea otters, harlequin ducks and other wildlife, a new study says. The 14-year study published yesterday in the journal Science points out that effects of the 11 million-gallon spill into Prince William Sound extended well beyond the initial deaths of 250,000 oiled seabirds, 2,800 otters and 300 harbor seals.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2002
SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA, Spain - Communities along Spain's northern coast girded for widespread oil contamination after a crippled tanker holding twice the load lost aboard the Exxon Valdez split in two yesterday and sank about 125 miles offshore. About 2 million gallons of its 20 million-gallon load from Russia spilled when the Prestige, a Greek-owned, Bahamian-registered tanker, foundered after leaking a trail of oil for six days from a widening crack in its unlined hull. The sinking prompted calls from environmental groups for accelerating a shift to sturdier tanker designs with double hulls designed to cut risks of big spills.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
The story of the oil tanker SeaRiver Mediterranean ends, it seems, in the same inglorious cliche that besets most ships in the U.S. merchant marine. Too expensive to sail on, it was pulled from service late last month and anchored off some forgotten coastline in the Far East, perhaps to die. But the SeaRiver Mediterranean is more than just another doomed American ship, it is perhaps the most infamous commercial vessel ever to fly the nation's flag - or any flag. It was, at least, in 1989, when it was still named the Exxon Valdez.
NEWS
By Charles Wohlforth | May 6, 2010
Each news update from the BP oil blowout in the Gulf of Mexico tightens a hard knot in my stomach. Alaskans who lived through the Exxon Valdez oil spill feel dark memories resurfacing. We talk about our sadness for the people in the way, people who don't know what's about to hit them. "They still seem to think they'll be able to contain this and stop it, and they just can't," said Rick Steiner, a former University of Alaska fisheries extension agent whose life was irrevocably upset by the Exxon Valdez, which spilled at least 11 million gallons of oil in Prince William Sound 21 years ago. "Not much oil is going to be recovered; they're not going to save much wildlife; they're not going to be able to restore damaged ecosystems."
NEWS
March 24, 1999
THE HEALTH of the ecology, if not of the human condition, is on its way to recovery since the nightmare oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound 10 years ago today.Oil-soaked otters and dying waterfowl that embodied the ecological horror of the ruptured tanker Exxon Valdez are no longer seen. A $2.2 billion cleanup effort scrubbed off much of the oleaginous shroud from the shores of the scenic sound. Tanker navigation rules were tightened, training increased, oil-skimming equipment and emergency teams put in place.
NEWS
October 9, 2002
Boyd Evison, 69, whose career in the National Park Service included overseeing the Exxon Valdez oil spill, died Friday in Beverly Hills, Calif., of cancer. During his 42 years in the Park Service, Mr. Evison held positions including superintendent of Saguaro National Monument and later the Horace Albright Training Center in Grand Canyon National Park, where he influenced many future employees of the Park Service. He also was superintendent of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, assistant director for park operations in Washington, and Grand Canyon's interim superintendent.
NEWS
March 24, 1999
THE HEALTH of the ecology, if not of the human condition, is on its way to recovery since the nightmare oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound 10 years ago today.Oil-soaked otters and dying waterfowl that embodied the ecological horror of the ruptured tanker Exxon Valdez are no longer seen. A $2.2 billion cleanup effort scrubbed off much of the oleaginous shroud from the shores of the scenic sound. Tanker navigation rules were tightened, training increased, oil-skimming equipment and emergency teams put in place.
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