Advertisement
HomeCollectionsExxon Corp
IN THE NEWS

Exxon Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 23, 2005
Richard T. Rozanski, a retired Exxon Corp. manager, died of cancer Sunday at his Glen Arm home. He was 70. Born in Kearney, N.J., he served in the Army and earned a business administration degree at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa. Mr. Rozanski was an Exxon manager for 31 years and held posts in Pennsylvania, Texas, Tennessee and Baltimore, where he moved in 1975. He retired in 1992. He was a St. Joseph Medical Center and elderhostel volunteer. Services were held yesterday at St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church in Hydes, where he was a member.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
Leonard Matthews Finley II, a retired employee relations manager for Exxon Corp., died June 18 from Alzheimer's disease at Somerford Assisted-Living in Annapolis. He was 87. Mr. Finley was born and raised in New Orleans, where he was a 1941 graduate of Jesuit High School. His college career at Tulane University was interrupted when he served in the Navy as a seaman from 1943 to 1946. He earned both a bachelor's and master's degree in chemical engineering from Tulane. He joined Exxon Corp.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 30, 1995
Exxon Russian venture likelyExxon Corp. is expected to sign a production-sharing agreement detailing terms to invest $15.2 billion in huge oil and natural gas fields off Russia's Sakhalin Island, an official of the company's Japanese partner said yesterday.The agreement would clear the way for Exxon to begin work on the first of three such ventures being promoted by the Russian government off Sakhalin Island directly north of Japan, which is expected to consume much of the project's output.
NEWS
June 23, 2005
Richard T. Rozanski, a retired Exxon Corp. manager, died of cancer Sunday at his Glen Arm home. He was 70. Born in Kearney, N.J., he served in the Army and earned a business administration degree at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa. Mr. Rozanski was an Exxon manager for 31 years and held posts in Pennsylvania, Texas, Tennessee and Baltimore, where he moved in 1975. He retired in 1992. He was a St. Joseph Medical Center and elderhostel volunteer. Services were held yesterday at St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church in Hydes, where he was a member.
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | April 2, 1991
General Motors Corp., the company that wears the Fortune 500 crown, has been dumped unceremoniously from rival Forbes magazine's "Super 50" list of the most powerful American companies.The April 29 issues of both magazines, due on newsstands next week, are awash with lists offering a statistical portrait of American business.The numbers and rankings reflect the onset of recession last year. Half of the 500 industrial companies on the Fortune list posted losses in 1990 or sharp earnings declines from 1989.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | March 31, 2000
Caution flags flying in the wind: More than $265 billion of stock in brokerage accounts is on margin (borrowed money). That's about 1.5 percent of the market's value -- the same level of margin debt as in the fall of 1987 before Black Monday's 22 percent crash. (Greg Smith, debt analyst) A Barron's poll showed 72 percent of money managers think stocks are on a senseless bubble. They keep buying because of how they're paid -- relative to others' performance. If a manager is bearish and everyone else is bullish, he is likely to be fired for underperformance.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 19, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rose to records, brushing off a slump in tobacco issues, as the highest oil prices since the Persian Gulf war fueled a rally in Exxon Corp. and other producers.After crashing through 6,000 Monday, the Dow Jones industrial average began its assault on the next century mark, climbing 35.03 to a record 6,094.23 yesterday. The march to all-time highs has left some investors behind, and now they're throwing more money into stocks to avoid being caught short, analysts said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 1997
NEW YORK -- New York City is using some of the money that Exxon Corp. paid to settle a lawsuit stemming from the Exxon Veldex spill to help clean marshes and wetlands in the city.In March 1989 the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of oil into the pristine waters of Alaska's Prince William Sound, causing one of the worst environmental disasters in history.To settle the resulting lawsuit, filed by Alaska and the federal government - in addition to the $2 billion the company paid for direct cleanup costs - Exxon agreed to pay $900 million to be used for environmental good works around the United States.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 29, 1999
NEW YORK -- The Dow Jones industrial average climbed to a second straight record yesterday, as investors bought shares of manufacturers such as Alcoa Inc. and DuPont Co., encouraged by reports indicating faster growth in U.S. factory orders and Japan's economy.America Online Inc. and Microsoft Corp. led a slump in computer-related stocks, leaving the broader U.S. market mixed, and McKesson HBOC Inc. plunged after the largest U.S. drug wholesaler restated earnings.The Dow average gained 13.74 to 10,845.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | September 27, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell yesterday amid concern that corporate profits won't beat expectations for the rest of this year because of weak economic growth. That outlook helped steady-earning drug, food and health care companies.Federal Reserve policy-makers decided against reducing U.S. interest rates yesterday, suggesting they are content to let the economy expand at a slower pace. Expectations that profits would surpass estimates in the third and fourth quarters helped send stocks to record highs this month.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 22, 2001
A spokeswoman for Exxon Mobil Corp. confirmed this week that the oil company intends to demolish the former gas station building at Oakland Mills Village Center, clear away the debris and sell the site for redevelopment. Jeanne Miller, the spokeswoman, said the building would be removed "within the next several months." Exxon Mobil crews removed the underground gas tanks at the site, in the 5900 block of Stevens Forest Road, on Feb. 8. The station, closed since September 1999, is considered an eyesore and a burden on the village center, Oakland Mills officials have said.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | March 31, 2000
Caution flags flying in the wind: More than $265 billion of stock in brokerage accounts is on margin (borrowed money). That's about 1.5 percent of the market's value -- the same level of margin debt as in the fall of 1987 before Black Monday's 22 percent crash. (Greg Smith, debt analyst) A Barron's poll showed 72 percent of money managers think stocks are on a senseless bubble. They keep buying because of how they're paid -- relative to others' performance. If a manager is bearish and everyone else is bullish, he is likely to be fired for underperformance.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 29, 1999
NEW YORK -- The Dow Jones industrial average climbed to a second straight record yesterday, as investors bought shares of manufacturers such as Alcoa Inc. and DuPont Co., encouraged by reports indicating faster growth in U.S. factory orders and Japan's economy.America Online Inc. and Microsoft Corp. led a slump in computer-related stocks, leaving the broader U.S. market mixed, and McKesson HBOC Inc. plunged after the largest U.S. drug wholesaler restated earnings.The Dow average gained 13.74 to 10,845.
NEWS
By Dr. Brant Mittler | December 13, 1998
LOS ANGELES - Under California jurisprudence, the burden of guilt apparently stretches longer than the Pacific Coast Highway.How else can you interpret a Los Angeles judge's recent comments encouraging a jury to force five chemical companies to pay $785 million in damages to defense workers who worked with their products at a top-secret defense facility in Burbank, Calif.?The workers claimed they were unknowingly exposed to the chemicals because their employer, Lockheed Co., removed the warning labels from the chemicals' containers.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1998
Though dwarfed by the behemoth that would result from the proposed merger of Exxon Corp. and Mobil Corp., Baltimore-based Crown Central Petroleum Corp. says it intends to stay independent."We're a niche player in this business, and have been a niche player since 1930. And that's served us well," said Joseph M. Coale, director of corporate communications for the independent refiner. "We think there's a place in the market for medium-sized niche players and we intend to maintain that position for the foreseeable future."
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1998
Exxon Corp. and Mobil Corp. formally announced their blockbuster merger yesterday, saying they intend to reunite two pillars of the fabled Standard Oil monopoly and surpass General Motors as the biggest corporation in the United States.The proposed combination, disclosed last week, faces hurdles from U.S. and European regulators as well as protests by environmentalists and consumer groups.But Exxon Chairman Lee Raymond said he's confident about completing the merger in mid-1999."There are some very clear advantages," Raymond said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 14, 1997
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks, alternately buffeted and bolstered by the bond market, were mixed yesterday as a decline by Exxon Corp. hurt oil shares.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 32.52 to 7,928.32, after rising 79 points and falling 81 points. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 4.51 to 922.02, led by Exxon, and the Nasdaq composite index rose 7.16 to 1,583.40, led by Applied Materials Corp.Among broad market indexes, the Russell 2,000 index of small capitalization stocks rose 0.22 to 411.64; the Wilshire 5,000 index, comprising stocks on the New York, American and Nasdaq stock exchanges, fell 31.13 to 8,784.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1998
Exxon Corp. and Mobil Corp. formally announced their blockbuster merger yesterday, saying they intend to reunite two pillars of the fabled Standard Oil monopoly and surpass General Motors as the biggest corporation in the United States.The proposed combination, disclosed last week, faces hurdles from U.S. and European regulators as well as protests by environmentalists and consumer groups.But Exxon Chairman Lee Raymond said he's confident about completing the merger in mid-1999."There are some very clear advantages," Raymond said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 1997
NEW YORK -- New York City is using some of the money that Exxon Corp. paid to settle a lawsuit stemming from the Exxon Veldex spill to help clean marshes and wetlands in the city.In March 1989 the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of oil into the pristine waters of Alaska's Prince William Sound, causing one of the worst environmental disasters in history.To settle the resulting lawsuit, filed by Alaska and the federal government - in addition to the $2 billion the company paid for direct cleanup costs - Exxon agreed to pay $900 million to be used for environmental good works around the United States.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 14, 1997
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks, alternately buffeted and bolstered by the bond market, were mixed yesterday as a decline by Exxon Corp. hurt oil shares.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 32.52 to 7,928.32, after rising 79 points and falling 81 points. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 4.51 to 922.02, led by Exxon, and the Nasdaq composite index rose 7.16 to 1,583.40, led by Applied Materials Corp.Among broad market indexes, the Russell 2,000 index of small capitalization stocks rose 0.22 to 411.64; the Wilshire 5,000 index, comprising stocks on the New York, American and Nasdaq stock exchanges, fell 31.13 to 8,784.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.