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NEWS
June 14, 2011
Extreme weather is on the rise ("Maryland braces for second heat wave," June 7). Maryland's heat wave is just one example, and scientists predict these extreme events will become increasingly common due to global warming. Heat waves are actually more lethal than other extreme events and pose greater danger to at-risk groups. In our recent report, "Global Warming and Extreme Weather," we found the number of heat waves has gone up since 1960, while 2010 is tied for the warmest year on record.
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NEWS
By Cheryl Casciani | March 14, 2014
So, how about this weather? This question is often just small talk, but conversation about the recent weather has not been simple idle chatter. While Baltimore was bundled up against the frigid "polar vortex," Alaska saw record high temperatures. While Atlanta was virtually shut down in an unusual winter storm, California experienced a severe drought. Scientists predict climate change will mean more extreme weather - longer droughts, bigger storms and more extreme hot and cold temperatures.
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NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | July 5, 2012
There were no tornado warnings last Friday night, when I muted the Nationals game around 11 p.m. I listened intently through my living-room window. A train, I thought. Definitely a train. I should have known better. The warnings have been building for many months. We had historically hot temperatures in Washington and Baltimore last summer. Then epic rain and flooding from Tropical Storm Lee in September. Then March temperatures across the U.S. so hot they surpassed normal high temperatures for April in many places.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center on Thursday placed the globe on El Niño watch, with a 50 percent chance of the global climate pattern developing by summer or fall. El Nino is characterized by above-average Pacific Ocean surface temperatures along the equator, just west of South America. It can cause climate patterns that contribute to extreme weather around the world, with some areas prone to drought or others to flooding, for example. In Maryland and the Northeast, El Niño is perhaps best known for bringing snowy winters -- though that's not required, as this snowy winter occurred under what are considered "neutral" conditions, with neither El Niño or La Niña present.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 10, 2013
We're living in the eye of a perfect storm of weather anxiety - climate change and extreme storms, increasingly accurate forecasts by meteorologists, and the power and desire of news media to fully exploit our fears. Even a day or two of rain stirs a little panic now. By the time it reached Maryland and the mid-Atlantic late last week, Tropical Storm Andrea had turned into nothing but intermittently heavy rains and gusty winds. Yet you could almost sense the region's collective blood pressure rise as the storm approached.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 17, 2013
Most Marylanders say people in the United States are already being harmed by climate change, a new poll finds. In a statewide mail survey of 2,100 households, the poll by George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication found that 52 percent of Marylanders see evidence that climate change is hurting Americans. That's a stronger view than is held by Americans generally, it seems. Only 34 percent of those asked nationwide said they believed climate change was already harming people in this country, according to the pollsters.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2004
Monday's rains were extraordinary - more than 6 inches fell in North East and more than 11 inches in Smyrna, Del. An astonishing 13 inches fell in Tabernacle, in central New Jersey. For Marylanders, the deluge seemed all the more amazing, coming just five days after 3 to 4 inches of rain raised the Jones Falls and Gwynns Falls in Baltimore by 6 to 8 feet, stranding motorists and flooding businesses. What's going on here? Meteorologists attribute Monday's heavy rains to an unusual combination of factors that converged over a region stretching from northeastern Maryland into northern New Jersey.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
Extreme weather events are on the rise, and scientists warn that global warming will bring even more extreme weather in the future ("Derecho and heat wave in review: records, rankings, and by the numbers," July 9). We know that power plants are the largest single source of the carbon pollution fueling climate change, but for too long power plants haven't had any federal limits on how much carbon they can spew into the air. President Obama and the Environmental Protection Agency are working to fix this.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | August 11, 2007
Dennis Barnes of Abingdon has a beef about "heat index" and "wind chill" numbers: "Isn't this sensationalism a bit silly? Why do the media feel that it is necessary to tell me how hot or cold it feels, when all I need to do is step outside?" It can be silly, especially when the real and "index" readings are very close or benign. But during extreme weather, they do warn of real and potentially dangerous added effects on the human body that temperature alone can't convey.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
We're coming up on the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy next month, just as a new report reveals the biggest culprits for causing global warming and pollution, which scientists warn will bring even more extreme weather in the future ( "The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18). Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center finds power plants are Maryland's single largest source of carbon pollution. Even as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative works to cut carbon pollution and transition Maryland to clean energy, power plants remain the single largest source of carbon pollution in America.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
We're coming up on the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy next month, just as a new report reveals the biggest culprits for causing global warming and pollution, which scientists warn will bring even more extreme weather in the future ( "The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18). Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center finds power plants are Maryland's single largest source of carbon pollution. Even as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative works to cut carbon pollution and transition Maryland to clean energy, power plants remain the single largest source of carbon pollution in America.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 17, 2013
Most Marylanders say people in the United States are already being harmed by climate change, a new poll finds. In a statewide mail survey of 2,100 households, the poll by George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication found that 52 percent of Marylanders see evidence that climate change is hurting Americans. That's a stronger view than is held by Americans generally, it seems. Only 34 percent of those asked nationwide said they believed climate change was already harming people in this country, according to the pollsters.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 10, 2013
We're living in the eye of a perfect storm of weather anxiety - climate change and extreme storms, increasingly accurate forecasts by meteorologists, and the power and desire of news media to fully exploit our fears. Even a day or two of rain stirs a little panic now. By the time it reached Maryland and the mid-Atlantic late last week, Tropical Storm Andrea had turned into nothing but intermittently heavy rains and gusty winds. Yet you could almost sense the region's collective blood pressure rise as the storm approached.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Weather disasters including tornadoes, the derecho storm and Hurricane Sandy caused at least $48 million in property and crop damages in Maryland last year, the costliest since 2003, according to data released Thursday. Five people also died from extreme weather - high temperatures, for the most part - and 10 people were injured. The data do not include things like traffic deaths or electrocutions from downed power lines, considered to be indirectly caused by the weather, said Brenton MacAloney, a meterologist with the National Weather Service in Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
The National Weather Service has launched a pilot project in the Baltimore and Washington, D.C., areas that aims to help local leaders better respond to weather emergencies, officials said Saturday. As part of the initiative, the weather service has added three specialists who will be available to staff local emergency centers, like the Maryland Emergency Management Agency's command center, during extreme weather events. Officials also plan to provide more information on how weather might impact society and how governments can prepare, better explanations of the possibilities within weather forecasts, and better maps of flood threats.
NEWS
August 9, 2012
Given events like Snowmageddon, Hurricane Irene, and last month's derecho storm, it's no wonder officials are calling the recent uptick of extreme weather the "new normal" ("Severe weather renews climate-change talks in Washington, Annapolis," Aug. 1). To drive home the point, a recent Environment Maryland report confirms that extreme rainstorms and snowstorms are happening 55 percent more frequently in the Mid-Atlantic region than in 1948. And the strongest storms in Maryland are dumping 14 percent more precipitation.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
I agree with Mike Tidwell that fossil-fuel-based global warming is producing violent changes in our weather - something that only the most die-hard right-wingers (think Rush Limbaugh) and those in the hip pocket of the oil industry (think Tom Coburn) are still denying ("Going to extremes," July 6). But to only offer wind, solar and geothermal power as solutions really just sidesteps the problem, and in the case of electric cars does nothing at all (at least until our electricity doesn't come mostly from burning coal and natural gas)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Policies to change building codes in flood plains and on shorelines, construct offshore wind turbines and manage suburban sprawl could gain political traction, officials hope, as recent extreme weather renews a conversation on climate change in Maryland and nationally. State efforts to adapt to what officials are calling a "new normal" climate took center stage in a U.S. Senate hearing on climate change Wednesday, the first in 21/2 years. The state plans to begin integrating expectations of higher sea levels and more violent weather into government programs and policies by year's end. Such changes are necessary, officials said, as Maryland and the nation endure a hot, dry summer, the latest in what seems like a surge in severe weather.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
Extreme weather events are on the rise, and scientists warn that global warming will bring even more extreme weather in the future ("Derecho and heat wave in review: records, rankings, and by the numbers," July 9). We know that power plants are the largest single source of the carbon pollution fueling climate change, but for too long power plants haven't had any federal limits on how much carbon they can spew into the air. President Obama and the Environmental Protection Agency are working to fix this.
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