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By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | September 12, 1991
In the music business, perception is everything.For the Boston band Extreme, whose music veers mainly toward a funky hard rock style, the release of the single "More Than Words" six months ago was almost a frantic, desparate push for a hit single.It just so happens that the ballad, which features Gary Cherone's lilting tenor over the acoustic strains of Nuno Bettencourt's guitar, has streaked up the charts to No. 1 and has been the year's most played song on the radio.Even the title of the album, "Pornograffitti," suggests something other than what should be heard on mix radio.
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By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Baltimore County police continue to search for the second suspect in a double killing in Rosedale last month. Charles William Mitter, 39, and Tyray Avia Wise, 26, were stabbed more than 70 times in a dispute over $25,000, investigators wrote in court documents. Mitter also was shot several times. Police charged Carlos Lomax, 45, a few days after the killings. But police said Lomax, who is Mitter's stepbrother, had an accomplice. The second suspect is described only as a black man, 5-foot-7 to 5-foot-8, wearing a black jumpsuit with white socks, according to charging documents filed in District Court.
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FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts | August 20, 2005
When TV star Ty Pennington strolled into her home in Washington's Capitol Heights neighborhood last Saturday, Veronica Ginyard's world changed. One Sunday night this fall, fans of ABC's hit series Extreme Makeover: Home Edition are liable to find out just how many nails it takes to hammer together a happier life. Ginyard, 44, knows something about rehabilitation. Just five years ago, the single mom extricated herself from an abusive long-term relationship, a situation that got so bad she twice ventured to Baltimore, where she sought help at the House of Ruth Maryland, a battered-women's crisis center.
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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Baltimore County police were warning motorists in the central Towson and Lutherville areas Wednesday of a number of traffic lights that were out, though some began to come back on after noon. Police said motorists should use extreme caution at intersections where a traffic signal has malfunctioned. Police spokesman Cpl. John Wachter said BGE has been contacted about the issue. "We are suspecting a problem with a transformer at York and West roads may have caused the outage. " Around noon the BGE website reported 14 outages in the area, but the cause was still being investigated.
NEWS
By Flora Lewis | January 28, 1992
Paris -- WHILE THE focus is on the East, Western Europe has entered what might be called a period of national psychic troubles.It may be a concluding shudder before the plunge into the coming European union, it may be a contagion as Cold War assumptions give way to myriad uncertainties.Like resurgent nationalism in the East and fundamentalism in Islam, it has to do with identity and asserting difference at a time of rapid change.The essentially procedural definitions of capitalism as an impersonal market force and democracy as an arithmetical political force have left an emptiness.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 4, 1991
Reducing an arena-sized show to nightclub dimensions is always a mixed proposition. On the one hand, you lose a lot of spectacle in the transition to a smaller stage, while on the other, you gain a degree of intimacy impossible in hockey rinks.Such was the case when the triple bill of Winger, Extreme and Tangier played Hammerjacks over the weekend. Compared to most arena shows, Saturday's had little in the way of visual flash, with minimal lighting and only a touch of dry-ice fog onstage.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 2, 1995
All of NBC's shows but "Friends" are in repeats tonight -- but that's still no reason to watch "Love and Betrayal: The Mia Farrow Story."* "Mad About You" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- The temperature in the Buckmans' apartment provides several different readings -- depending upon who is interpreting the heatedness of the couple's intimate activities. NBC.* "Extreme" (8-9 p.m., Channel 2) -- Which do you remember the most about Super Bowl XXIX: the score, the ABC program that followed it, or the Pepsi commercial with the Coke driver being thrown through a window?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 29, 1993
Success, in the pop music world, is all relative. If your last few albums only sold 30,000 or 40,000 copies, cracking the 100,000 mark seems a major achievement.If, on the other hand, your last album sold more than 4 million copies worldwide -- that is, if it sold as well as Extreme's "Pornograffitti" did -- everyone in the industry automatically expects that your new one will sell at least as well. And, because Extreme's latest album, "Three Sides to Every Story," hasn't done multiplatinum business right out of the box, there's been a lot of talk lately about the band's standing in the marketplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2001
It wasn't so long ago that appearing extreme was a bad thing. Political scientists still blame Barry Goldwater's statement "Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice" as being chiefly responsible for his losing the White House to Lyndon Johnson in 1964. Now, look around. Extreme vanilla. Extreme deodorants. Extreme Sausage Sandwiches. Extreme razors. Extreme catheters for laser coronary angioplasties. Extreme Elvis. Extreme for Jesus. The makers of most of these -- and several hundred other products and services -- paid a $325 fee to protect their brand name with the United States Patent and Trademark Office in Washington.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
Travis Pastrana sits on his living room sofa. At 15, he looks fresh-faced and happy. He radiates a kind of calm sweetness. But don't be deceived. Pastrana, of Annapolis, is not your normal 15-year-old.A couple of weeks ago, in fact, he was so far over the edge that he was even judged too extreme for ESPN's X Games. The X stands for Extreme, but when Pastrana took off on his 125cc yellow Suzuki and landed in San Francisco Bay, it was too much for ESPN producers."I was just happy," Pastrana said of his plunge after winning the gold medal in the first freestyle Moto X competition.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
After months of hesitation, President Barack Obama has authorized the use of U.S. military force, including limited airstrikes, against Islamic militants in Iraq who in recent months have overrun large parts of the country and now threaten the northern city of Erbil as well as tens of thousands of Iraqi civilians trapped atop a barren mountain where they sought refuge after fleeing their homes. Up to now Mr. Obama has gone out of his way to avoid American involvement in the multiple conflicts roiling the region, including the bitter civil war in Syria that has claimed more than 140,000 lives and given rise to a radical extremist group, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, that now controls large swaths of territory on both sides of the Syrian-Iraqi border.
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Leonard Pitts Jr | May 8, 2014
There was a method to this madness. Meaning that night more than three weeks ago when a caravan of trucks and buses descended on a boarding school in rural Nigeria and more than 200 schoolgirls were abducted from their beds. As is often the case with acts of terror, this mass kidnapping was accomplished with a theatricality and audacity designed to inspire awe. But the act of terror was also an act of fear. What the 2012 shooting of Malala Yousafzai in Pakistan suggested, the mid-April taking of these Christian and Muslim children makes abundantly clear: Extremist Islam is scared of little girls.
SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | May 5, 2014
At the end of an entertaining Extreme Rules pay-per-view, Daniel Bryan retained his title in a main event that brought many wrestling fans back to the Attitude era. The match, an extreme rules match, featured savage beatdowns with chairs, kendo sticks and other weapons, a brawl that went through the backstage area to the parking garage, cars being destroyed, a forklift being employed, and finally, a flaming table that Kane went through. It was the kind of violence in a match that, for the most part, had been toned down over the past decade.
SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | May 4, 2014
Remember when WWE Extreme Rules used to feature “extreme” matches? Before 2012, Extreme Rules (or One Night Stand, as it was previously called) was a pay-per-view event that featured big stipulations in every match. In 2012 and 2013, although not every match had these stipulations, a majority of the matches still were considered “extreme.” This year, even if you include the WeeLC match, there are only three matches that have an extreme stipulation to them. Now, that doesn't mean that this won't be a good pay-per-view.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Outside her Parkside home on Tuesday afternoon, Myra Mickey watched as a Baltimore public works employee labored several feet below her street to repair a broken water main. "They've been working around the clock," Mickey, 50, said of the city workers, who first arrived on her street late the night before, when her water also was switched off. "If they weren't here, I'd probably be getting a little heated under my collar. " The workers' presence was reassuring, but also came months after Mickey first began calling the city about suspicious cracks in the street, about water bubbling up, about the inadequacy of a brief repair job that seemed to do nothing "besides make a mess," she said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Extreme cold temperatures in the Baltimore region overnight and into Friday morning have disrupted Metro service throughout the city and its surrounding suburbs, forcing cars out of service and decreasing the capacity of trains. Trains are operating on normal schedules, but are arriving at stations with only four cars, instead of the normal six, officials said. The entire Metro system is being impacted. The problems could last several days as temperatures remain low through the weekend, said Paul Shepard, a Maryland Transit Administration spokesman, on Friday morning.
NEWS
August 4, 2006
Did you know?-- Extreme heat caused 3,442 deaths -- 66 percent men -- between 1999 and 2003. -- U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | April 17, 2003
3D Extreme 3D System doesn't jump off screen I've come to view the phrase "as seen on TV" on any gadget's box as a sign of coming disappointment in my life. And so, the X3D Technologies X3D Extreme 3D System, which provides three-dimensional viewing of games played on your PC, met my low expectations. The Extreme 3D System was not a total failure, it just didn't seem to impress as much as it should at $99. The system comprises hardware and software that turn the 2-D images on your computer screen into stereoscopic 3-D images - whether they're coming from a game, the Internet or some other source, such as a DVD or television connection.
NEWS
By Zainab Chaudry | January 21, 2014
Earlier this month, 28-year-old Todd Wheeler Jr. of Glen Burnie was arrested on charges of making explosives. Had they detonated, the radius of the blast could have caused extensive damage, deaths and injuries. Also this month, Ellicott City resident Mohammad Hassan Khalid was scheduled to be sentenced for conspiring to aid terrorists. Mr. Khalid was a bright teenager with a full scholarship to Johns Hopkins University at the time of his arrest two years ago. His attorney said Mr. Khalid's actions were influenced by his youth and mental health issues.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Without snowfall or ice on the roads, decisions by several Maryland school systems to cancel schools during a recent cold snap perplexed many. The polar vortex brought frigid arctic air into most of the country, and many schools in Baltimore and the region canceled or delayed classes — a measure aimed at keeping students warm and avoiding facility problems. Harford County Public Schools were among those closed Tuesday, when temperatures were in the single digits. The school system also had two-hour delays on Monday and Wednesday.
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