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By John R. Alden and John R. Alden,Special to the Sun | February 28, 1999
Are we alone in the Universe? Some very solid science indicates that the answer is "No." From what we know about stars, planets and chemistry, there is every reason to believe that living things -- carbon-based organisms that grow, reproduce and evolve -- are relatively common in our galaxy. But if life is as widespread as our current understanding would indicate, and natural selection is as powerful as biologists believe, why haven't we been contacted by any other intelligent species? Why is it so quiet out there?
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By MICHAEL STROH and MICHAEL STROH,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
By day, Martin Courtney pounds out reports for a government contractor. But at night, in his South Baltimore rowhouse, his job title is far more exotic: cosmic dust hunter. Courtney is one of thousands of recruits squinting at their computer screens each day in an unusual scientific treasure hunt: the quest to find microscopic motes of interstellar dust captured by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. The project is a new twist on a growing scientific trend. As research budgets shrink and the hunger for number-crunching grows, more professional scientists are seeking help from interested amateurs and their Internet-connected computers.
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NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Alisa Samuels contributed to this article | August 12, 1996
Pastor Ed Simpson was at the pulpit of Harvester Baptist Church in Columbia yesterday morning, talking about God's calling, about the sacrifices of missionary life, about Mars."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | September 24, 2005
Finally, a movie where Baltimore gets to play Baltimore -- and starring Nicole Kidman, no less. The Visiting -- formerly known as Invasion -- begins filming here Monday. But a news conference featuring its stars and director was held yesterday in Washington, where other parts of the movie will be filmed -- perhaps it was just too much to ask the national press to schlep all the way to the other end of the parkway. Still, after Baltimore's recent history of standing in for other cities (in XXX: State of the Union, it played Washington; in Major League II, it subbed for Cleveland)
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
Cyril A. Ponnamperuma, an internationally recognized theoretician on the origins of life and professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Maryland College Park, died Tuesday of a heart attack at Washington Adventist Hospital. He was 71.He retired from teaching this year but continued as director of the Laboratory of Chemical Evolution, which he had founded when he arrived at UM in 1971.In November, he was appointed director of the North-South Center For Sustainable Life Development at UM, which studies and supports development of Third World nations.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
"Contact," based on a novel by the late astronomer Carl Sagan, begins as wondrously as any movie in recent memory.The first camera shot shows a quarter view of Mother Earth, a cheery, aquamarine-colored ball of clay viewed from just outside hTC our atmosphere. We hear the crackle of television, radio and cellular transmissions and their cacophony of talk and music.Suddenly, the camera pulls back, and we're on the far side of the moon, and then farther out still as Mars skips by and then Jupiter and Saturn.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | September 24, 2005
Finally, a movie where Baltimore gets to play Baltimore -- and starring Nicole Kidman, no less. The Visiting -- formerly known as Invasion -- begins filming here Monday. But a news conference featuring its stars and director was held yesterday in Washington, where other parts of the movie will be filmed -- perhaps it was just too much to ask the national press to schlep all the way to the other end of the parkway. Still, after Baltimore's recent history of standing in for other cities (in XXX: State of the Union, it played Washington; in Major League II, it subbed for Cleveland)
NEWS
By MICHAEL STROH and MICHAEL STROH,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
By day, Martin Courtney pounds out reports for a government contractor. But at night, in his South Baltimore rowhouse, his job title is far more exotic: cosmic dust hunter. Courtney is one of thousands of recruits squinting at their computer screens each day in an unusual scientific treasure hunt: the quest to find microscopic motes of interstellar dust captured by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. The project is a new twist on a growing scientific trend. As research budgets shrink and the hunger for number-crunching grows, more professional scientists are seeking help from interested amateurs and their Internet-connected computers.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 1995
The plan is to divide up the sky, then have a different volunteer monitor each patch for radio broadcasts from distant planets as part of the search for alien life.After all, the federal government won't do it anymore. So Paul Shuch, a professor of electrical engineering, is persuading citizens around the country to turn their TV satellite dishes heavenward in search of cosmic company.His plan is to pick up part of the NASA project known as the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, or SETI.
NEWS
March 23, 2004
Roy F. Craig, 79, who worked on the nation's largest, most systematic investigation of flying saucers, died of cancer Thursday at his 186-acre La Boca Ranch, a former Indian trading post in Ignacio, Colo. Dr. Craig was chief field investigator for The Colorado Project, the official government search for scientifically verifiable evidence of the existence of unidentified flying objects. The three-volume Condon report that Dr. Craig co-authored debunked mysteries about outer space, yet he said UFOs did get people to think about the possibility of extraterrestrial life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John R. Alden and John R. Alden,Special to the Sun | February 28, 1999
Are we alone in the Universe? Some very solid science indicates that the answer is "No." From what we know about stars, planets and chemistry, there is every reason to believe that living things -- carbon-based organisms that grow, reproduce and evolve -- are relatively common in our galaxy. But if life is as widespread as our current understanding would indicate, and natural selection is as powerful as biologists believe, why haven't we been contacted by any other intelligent species? Why is it so quiet out there?
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
"Contact," based on a novel by the late astronomer Carl Sagan, begins as wondrously as any movie in recent memory.The first camera shot shows a quarter view of Mother Earth, a cheery, aquamarine-colored ball of clay viewed from just outside hTC our atmosphere. We hear the crackle of television, radio and cellular transmissions and their cacophony of talk and music.Suddenly, the camera pulls back, and we're on the far side of the moon, and then farther out still as Mars skips by and then Jupiter and Saturn.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Alisa Samuels contributed to this article | August 12, 1996
Pastor Ed Simpson was at the pulpit of Harvester Baptist Church in Columbia yesterday morning, talking about God's calling, about the sacrifices of missionary life, about Mars."
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 1995
The plan is to divide up the sky, then have a different volunteer monitor each patch for radio broadcasts from distant planets as part of the search for alien life.After all, the federal government won't do it anymore. So Paul Shuch, a professor of electrical engineering, is persuading citizens around the country to turn their TV satellite dishes heavenward in search of cosmic company.His plan is to pick up part of the NASA project known as the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, or SETI.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
Cyril A. Ponnamperuma, an internationally recognized theoretician on the origins of life and professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Maryland College Park, died Tuesday of a heart attack at Washington Adventist Hospital. He was 71.He retired from teaching this year but continued as director of the Laboratory of Chemical Evolution, which he had founded when he arrived at UM in 1971.In November, he was appointed director of the North-South Center For Sustainable Life Development at UM, which studies and supports development of Third World nations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 1996
Scientists studying a meteorite that fell to Earth from Mars have identified organic compounds and certain minerals that they conclude "are evidence for primitive life on early Mars."The discovery of the first organic molecules ever seen in a Martian rock is being hailed as startling and compelling evidence that at least microbial life existed on Mars long ago, when the planet was warmer and wetter.The molecules found in the rock, which left Mars some 15 million years ago, are being described as the fossil trace of past biological activity.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 15, 1997
Baltimore Playwrights Festival veteran Mark Scharf has demonstrated his skills as a playwright in two previous festival productions, but his latest entry, "Second Star to the Right," is lost in space.The issues he tackles are potent enough: the difficulty of xTC balancing career and personal life; the onerous necessity of begging for grant money to support creativity. He even touches on espionage and, though he doesn't develop it, the conflict between science and the Catholic Church.But the Spotlighters' production lacks potency.
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