Advertisement
HomeCollectionsExtract
IN THE NEWS

Extract

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 12, 2005
Some time ago, you had a letter from a woman who was drinking too much wine in the evening and wanted to cut back. You told her about a tea or an herbal concoction to diminish her desire to drink. She had tried it and was thrilled with the results. What was it? She took kudzu-root extract (available in health-food stores). Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) is famous as an invasive vine in the South. In its native China, kudzu has long been used to help people control their desire for alcohol. New research (Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, May 2005)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | July 5, 2012
There were no tornado warnings last Friday night, when I muted the Nationals game around 11 p.m. I listened intently through my living-room window. A train, I thought. Definitely a train. I should have known better. The warnings have been building for many months. We had historically hot temperatures in Washington and Baltimore last summer. Then epic rain and flooding from Tropical Storm Lee in September. Then March temperatures across the U.S. so hot they surpassed normal high temperatures for April in many places.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
"Extract" is an exuberant original. This daft farce about a man who has founded and run a successful flavor extract company and lost the sexual attention of his wife is a workplace film like no other and one of the best comedies of the year. The film has sharper testicle jokes than all of the Judd Apatow gang's recent farces put together, a poolside seduction that's organic and uproarious, and a streak of stoner-slacker humor that's like repeated hits from a bong that's actually good for you. If those accolades have a primal ring to them, it's because writer-director Mike Judge, who a decade ago made the ultimate cubicle movie, "Office Space," brings the brains of a satirical biologist to his view of life on a bottling line and in all the office nooks and crannies - and trailer parks and upscale suburbs - surrounding it. If the movie doesn't surge with unabated potency like classic screwball comedy, it's got its own erratic snap, crackle and pop. And the ensemble (including Jason Bateman as company owner Joel Reynold and Kristen Wiig as his wife, Suzie)
NEWS
November 7, 2011
The Maryland Public Service Commission's ongoing review of the proposed merger of Constellation Energy Group and Exelon Corp. has uncovered numerous pros and cons for the Baltimore-area consumer, from the loss of a corporate headquarters to the proposed one-time $100 credit on consumer bills. Much more testimony remains to be heard. But if there's one wrinkle to emerge from last week's hearings that demands a PSC response, it's this: Exelon appears interested in investing more in Maryland-based renewable power.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1996
For 18-year-old Jason Selig, spending his summer on a science project is much more rewarding than going to the beach."Most times, when you ask kids what they did over the summer, they'll say they got sunburn and hung out at home," said the senior at Chesapeake Senior High School. "I'd rather say that I did research over the summer. It's more challenging than watching TV at my house."And that's what Mr. Selig did. He spent last summer researching the effects of jellyfish extract on the growth of a weed.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | September 11, 2009
Extract : *** ( 3 STARS) Movies disappear quickly if they don't score at the box office the first day, so lovers of American comedy should dash out this weekend to erase the disappointing opening weekend of "Extract," the highly enjoyable new workplace comedy by Mike Judge ("Office Space"). No recent film has a saner view of the tensions among workers and management. Jason Bateman and Ben Affleck are both hilarious as, respectively, the righteous owner of a flavor-extract company and the bartender buddy who has bad ideas about how to improve his friend's marital life.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Lee and Elizabeth Lee,COX NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2005
Bakers, rejoice. Vanilla prices are plummeting after five years of increases that saw the cost of an 8-ounce bottle of extract rise higher than a pound of prime beef tenderloin. Some retailers have cut prices nearly in half; others are likely to do so in coming weeks. Wholesale prices dropped in February, when an abundant vanilla crop started coming to market. King Arthur Flour's spring catalog exhorts bakers to "stock up while you can" on cheaper vanilla. Other retailers have been slower to cut prices.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1997
James Locke and John Bowers think they might have found a pesticide for the future.Pepper.A pepper extract they began experimenting with last year shows promise as a pesticide to treat soils and help grow nursery plants, according to the two plant pathologists at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center.Bowers began experimenting with a pepper extract that also contains mustard in the summer of 1996, when he found some left over in his lab from a previous experiment."It was a shot in the dark.
FEATURES
By Karen Heller and Karen Heller,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 7, 1991
Wait! Don't eat Aunt Vertie's sugar cookies, no matter how tasty they look! Better you should rub them on your aching back.Wintergreen oil, an ingredient in Ben-Gay and other muscle-pain ointments, turned up in a recipe in the July issue of Gourmet magazine.Now the editors of the venerable magazine have found themselves in the unique, and unenviable, position of mailing 750,000 retraction letters, complete with a handy revised-recipe sticker to paste over the first recipe in the "Helen Gustafson's Sugar Cookies" article on page 88. The envelopes read "IMPORTANT: Please Open Immediately."
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | July 10, 1991
SOMETIMES LATE AT night I get the feeling that there's a chocolate dessert calling my name:"S-h-er-r-i-e, S-h-er-r-i-e,come here"This chocolate mousse,from Knox Gelatine Inc.,is one treat I can answer.One serving has 186 calories and five grams fat.I like to serve it with strawberries for dipping.One cup strawberries has 45 calories and zero fat.Satin Chocolate Mousse1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin1/4 cup cold skim milk1/2 cup skim milk, heated to boiling1/4 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips1 8-ounce container 1 percent cottage cheese1/4 cup sugar1 teaspoon vanilla extractIn blender,sprinkle gelatin over cold milk; let stand twminutes.
NEWS
December 20, 2010
Conjuring up a misleading comparison between a present-day opportunity and the Cuyahoga River fires makes for intriguing headlines, but it ignores present-day realities about hydraulic fracturing ( "Water on fire? Time to put this on ice," Dec. 20). Marylanders deserve to know the truth: hydraulic fracturing has been used safely for more than 60 years. Del. Heather Mizeur fails to account for previous studies by the EPA and what natural gas development has the potential to do for Marylanders.
NEWS
By Heather Mizeur | December 20, 2010
In 1969, the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland caught on fire and helped spark the American environmental movement. The result was landmark laws, the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency, and a generation of efforts to end pollution of the air we breathe and the water we drink. Forty years later and a short drive east, though, water is once again on fire. A flood of natural gas companies has swept into Appalachia, bringing the promise of both economic development and an American energy revolution.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
This is what progress looks like in cleaning up one of the most polluted industrial sites in the Chesapeake Bay region: A lone pump labors in a rubble-strewn field at Sparrows Point, making soft gasping noises as it siphons a thin stream of oily waste from underground. The pump is one of the first put in by steelmaker Severstal North America to tap the huge plume of contamination underlying the 2,300-acre peninsula in Baltimore's harbor, where the dirty business of making steel has been practiced for more than a century.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Using a rope harness, Baltimore County fire and rescue crews staged a dramatic and technically difficult extraction of an injured worker from the bottom of a 120-foot coal silo Friday night and sent him on his way to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Lt. Lynn Mullahey said managers at the Constellation Energy plant off Carroll Island Road in eastern Baltimore County called 911 at 6:13 p.m. to report that a contractor had fallen from the top of the silo. Mullahey said an advanced technical rescue team and crews from all over the county responded to the call, dealing with a cold, steady rain.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | September 11, 2009
Extract : *** ( 3 STARS) Movies disappear quickly if they don't score at the box office the first day, so lovers of American comedy should dash out this weekend to erase the disappointing opening weekend of "Extract," the highly enjoyable new workplace comedy by Mike Judge ("Office Space"). No recent film has a saner view of the tensions among workers and management. Jason Bateman and Ben Affleck are both hilarious as, respectively, the righteous owner of a flavor-extract company and the bartender buddy who has bad ideas about how to improve his friend's marital life.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
"Extract" is an exuberant original. This daft farce about a man who has founded and run a successful flavor extract company and lost the sexual attention of his wife is a workplace film like no other and one of the best comedies of the year. The film has sharper testicle jokes than all of the Judd Apatow gang's recent farces put together, a poolside seduction that's organic and uproarious, and a streak of stoner-slacker humor that's like repeated hits from a bong that's actually good for you. If those accolades have a primal ring to them, it's because writer-director Mike Judge, who a decade ago made the ultimate cubicle movie, "Office Space," brings the brains of a satirical biologist to his view of life on a bottling line and in all the office nooks and crannies - and trailer parks and upscale suburbs - surrounding it. If the movie doesn't surge with unabated potency like classic screwball comedy, it's got its own erratic snap, crackle and pop. And the ensemble (including Jason Bateman as company owner Joel Reynold and Kristen Wiig as his wife, Suzie)
NEWS
November 10, 1991
The county Board of Zoning Appeals has approved requests in two cases.Genstar Stone Products Co. of Hunt Valley requested a conditional use to extract limestone and a variance waiving the setback requirements of 200 feet at 1060 Medford Road.The board approved the request because Genstar owns the surrounding property and the extraction of limestone is "reasonable and appropriate."Larry R. Green requested an enlargement of an existing auto repair shop, classified as a non-conforming use, by construction ofa detached garage to be located to the rear of the shop.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
Tim Suhrstedt, born and bred in Catonsville, has the rare distinction of having shot two prominent pictures opening nationally the same day. "All About Steve" and "Extract" are farces, reflecting Suhrstedt's status as one of the go-to guys in movie comedy. But when he attended Catonsville High, he never thought he'd become a top Los Angeles-based cameraman, let alone one with an industrywide reputation for making comedy work visually. It was only when he crafted a Super 8 mm short for a cinema appreciation course at Lehigh University that Suhrstedt developed a case of the film bug. He went to work at Maryland Public Television when it still had a unit that shot on 16 mm film.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
Tim Suhrstedt, born and bred in Catonsville, has the rare distinction of having shot two prominent pictures opening nationally the same day. "All About Steve" and "Extract" are farces, reflecting Suhrstedt's status as one of the go-to guys in movie comedy. But when he attended Catonsville High, he never thought he'd become a top Los Angeles-based cameraman, let alone one with an industrywide reputation for making comedy work visually. It was only when he crafted a Super 8 mm short for a cinema appreciation course at Lehigh University that Suhrstedt developed a case of the film bug. He went to work at Maryland Public Television when it still had a unit that shot on 16 mm film.
FEATURES
August 28, 2009
Sept. 4 All About Steve : (20th Century Fox) Sandra Bullock plays an eccentric crossword puzzle constructor who falls for a handsome cable news cameraman and follows him across the country. With Thomas Haden Church and Bradley Cooper. Cold Souls: (The Samuel Goldwyn Co.) When souls can be extracted and traded as commodities, a man must track down his chickpea-size soul that was borrowed for a Russian soap-opera actress. With Paul Giamatti and David Strathairn. Extract: (Miramax Films)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.