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NEWS
June 24, 2011
To set the record straight, conservation organizations aren't the only ones that believe red knots should be protected under the Endangered Species Act ("Counting crabs," June 20). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agrees, which is why it placed the shorebird on the ESA candidate list in 2006. And we are not alone in supporting a moratorium on the harvest of horseshoe crabs; leading red knot scientists from the U.S., Canada, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay and Brazil also support a timeout on the take of crabs of Delaware Bay origin — particularly after observing a 5,000 bird drop in wintering locations this year.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | November 21, 2013
Dean Pees, in his words, had the dubious honor of being the first NFL defensive coordinator to watch an opponent prey on his defense with the wildcat offense. Early in the 2008 season, the Miami Dolphins stunned his New England Patriots by scoring four rushing touchdowns on direct snaps to running back Ronnie Brown, who also threw for a touchdown, in their wildcat formation during a 38-13 Dolphins win. Five years later, the wildcat is not yet extinct. The read-option offense -- similar in theory but more effective due to a legitimate passing threat -- is the new craze, but some teams still sporadically use the wildcat for a handful of plays to breathe life into their offenses.
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NEWS
January 12, 2004
AT LEAST five times in the Earth's history, near as scientists can tell, half or more of all plant and animal species were wiped out. They don't know why exactly, but suspect celestial events, such as gamma rays that might have destroyed the Earth's protective atmosphere, exposing all living things below to intense radiation from the sun, followed by a smog-induced ice age. Now, it looks like another mass extinction may be on the horizon - one that...
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
“PBS NewsHour,” once one of the nation's most influential broadcasts, is on the brink of marginalization - if not extinction. And for those of us who believe TV needs at least one noncommercial, nightly, national newscast in these increasingly corporate times, that's a cause for concern. The “NewsHour” has lost 48 percent of its audience in the past eight years, going from an average audience of 2.5 million viewers a night in 2005 to 1.3 million in fiscal year 2013 (PBS shows are measured in fiscal years)
NEWS
July 15, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Star Tribune of Minneapolis, which was published Monday.THE BALD eagle's impending exit from the protected species list is surely something to celebrate, not least for the symbolism of the achievement. But let there be no mistaking the rarity of this victory over the forces of extinction, or the enormity of loss to which it makes exception.Contemporary climate change linked to greenhouse gas emissions is already showing dramatic harm to corals and some other coastal plants and birds.
NEWS
By Newsday | January 6, 1993
This may sound apocalyptic, but ant expert and autho Edward O. Wilson warns bluntly that "the sixth great extinction spasm of geological time is upon us, grace of mankind."Only during rare instances in the earth's 4.6-billion-year history have species been driven into extinction as rapidly as they are disappearing now, Mr. Wilson observes in his new book, "The Diversity of Life."Extinctions of the past -- such as the great die-off recorded in fossils and rocks from 65 million years ago -- were cataclysmic, probably caused by the impact of a huge meteorite or by massive volcanic eruptions.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2004
Scientists say they have found the place where an asteroid or comet smashed into Earth 250 million years ago and may have triggered the largest extinction in history, setting the stage for the appearance of dinosaurs and eventually humans. The object created the Bedout crater in a rise of the ocean floor about 120 miles northwest of Australia, researchers say. They say their analysis of the glass and minerals found at key sites in Antarctica and Australia and dug out of the crater, at depths of 10,000 feet, show that the object hit at the same time as the planet began the largest-scale extinction in its history.
NEWS
By Julian L. Simon & Aaron Wildavsky | May 14, 1993
IF President Clinton signs the Rio accord to protect rare and endangered species, he will place scientific truth in greater danger than endangered species.A fair reading of the available data suggests a rate of extinction not even one-thousandth as great as doomsayers claim. If the rate were any lower, evolution itself would need to be questioned.The World Wildlife Fund, the main promulgator of alarm about biodiversity and the extinction of species, frames the issue in the starkest terms: "Without firing a shot, we may kill one-fifth of all species of life on this planet in the next 10 years."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2004
A team of international scientists says global warming could drive to extinction more than a third of the wildlife in the world's most ecologically sensitive areas by 2050 - and have similar, if less devastating effects on plants and animals worldwide. The researchers' study says rising temperatures will make it impossible for many plants and animals to fight for shrinking habitats in the Amazon, Australia, Africa and Mexico. "It's a wakeup call for conservationists and biologists that climate change is potentially having a dramatic effect on wildlife, especially when you consider the loss of habitat worldwide," said Lee Hannah, a co-author of the study and researcher with Conservation International in Washington.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
What ever happened to the White Warty Back? The Lined Pocketbook? The Coosa Elk Toe? That's what Arthur Bogan wants to know. For 18 years, he's been looking for these creatures - all species of freshwater mussel that were once plentiful in Southeastern rivers and streams. Bogan has looked all over, without success, and suspects the species are extinct, victims of pollution, and dams that choke the bivalves with silt. But looking for mussels is tricky work. Bogan sometimes snorkels, or uses a glass-bottomed bucket.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
It would be pleasant to think that foolish and inconsequential distinctions about usage will eventually fade away. I'm fairly sure that Anno Domini will deal with the hopefully  brigade, active over the past forty years, as it previously did with the contact  brigade.* Somewhere in my remote past I was schooled that it is improper to make an inanimate noun possessive, because inanimate objects cannot possess. Thus the drug's effect  is wrong and should be changed to the effect of the drug . This was so far back that I no longer recall what it was, admonition from a schoolteacher, injunction from an editor, or diktat from some self-appointed language expert, that led me to spend many years pointlessly rewriting possessives.  Today Bryan Garner writes that "possessives of nouns denoting inanimate objects are generally unobjectionable," and indeed they appear all over the place.
NEWS
May 25, 2012
The greatest commencement address ever is now more than three decades old. And it's safe to say it will never be surpassed or even equaled. It belongs to the ages. In 1979, its author summed up the condition of modern man by noting that, quote, more than at any other time in history, humanity is at the crossroads: One path leads to despair and utter hopelessness; the other, to total extinction. Let us pray we have the wisdom to choose correctly. Unquote. Bang. That's all she wrote.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
As an ardent supporter of former Republican Sen. Charles McC. Mathias Jr., it saddens me to observe what has happened to his Grand Old Party. It has made a grand terrible bargain with the devil. The equation is easy to see. They don't want to raise taxes on people earning over $1 million a year, which they say is critically important for the average American. To achieve this goal, they say, we must accept some things we may not like from a vocal minority of the party: Limiting women's access to contraception; limiting women's ability to make decisions regarding their health; and limiting men and women's right to marry whomever they wish.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
To set the record straight, conservation organizations aren't the only ones that believe red knots should be protected under the Endangered Species Act ("Counting crabs," June 20). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agrees, which is why it placed the shorebird on the ESA candidate list in 2006. And we are not alone in supporting a moratorium on the harvest of horseshoe crabs; leading red knot scientists from the U.S., Canada, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay and Brazil also support a timeout on the take of crabs of Delaware Bay origin — particularly after observing a 5,000 bird drop in wintering locations this year.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
It was one of Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit's most famous inventions, in 1714. But after nearly 300 years on the market, the still-common mercury thermometer now appears headed for extinction. While many Maryland residents probably still have them in their medicine cabinets, or on their walls, the retail sale of mercury thermometers has been banned in Maryland since 2002 because of mercury's hazards as a powerful neurotoxin. There are similar bans or restrictions in at least 17 other states, with more such legislation pending elsewhere, according to the Interstate Mercury Education and Reduction Clearinghouse.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | November 1, 2010
I won't waste time telling you how to vote in the upcoming elections, but I will provide some history and context on politics and the environment. The choices for environmental voters used to be harder — and that was a good thing. I began writing about the Chesapeake Bay almost 40 years ago, and for the first couple of decades I don't recall that the environment was a partisan issue. A short list of leaders who were instrumental then in working to restore the bay will make my point.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich | July 20, 1997
THE GUY IN the jaunty blue bandanna is as familiar a presence on East Baltimore Street as the flashing nude silhouette above the Two O'Clock Club.He's worked around the strip clubs for two decades, since he was 17. He used to be a doorman, calling "check it out, check it out" to the nightly crowds of fraternity boys, sailors, out-of-town businessmen. These days, he runs errands for the dancers, gets them cigarettes and sandwiches. He's grown philosophical, even nostalgic, about The Block.
NEWS
By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 8, 2004
Despite international efforts to promote biodiversity, a new study has found that hundreds of the world's animal species are in imminent danger of extinction, primarily in tropical mountains and islands in developing nations. The report, published yesterday in the journal Nature, concludes that although more than 10 percent of the Earth's land mass is afforded environmental protections, efforts are not being focused in places that have the greatest concentration of imperiled species. The "global gap analysis" conducted by scientists for Conservation International studied mammals, amphibians, birds, turtles and tortoises - which together represent just 1 percent of the planet's species.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2010
The ancient "whale" skull discovered eroding from the clay at Calvert Cliffs last spring is actually that of an extinct species of dolphin. Scientists and volunteers extracted the 16 million-year-old fossil from the cliffs over the weekend. They revealed what paleontologist Stephen Godfrey of the Calvert Marine Museum tentatively identified Tuesday as a Eurhinodelphinid , an odd-looking marine mammal with a long, slender upper snout and a lower jaw about half that length. "It looks a little like a swordfish," he said.
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