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Extending The School

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By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1994
Baltimore County parents and teachers made it clear last night that there is no one best solution to make up five "snow days" this school year.The 23 people who spoke during an hourlong public hearing were split almost evenly between extending the school year and a longer school day.A few speakers who suggested extending the school day wanted the longer hours split -- half in the morning and half in the afternoon.Superintendent Stuart Berger's staff recommended last week that the school day be lengthened by 45 minutes from April 5 to May 31 rather than extending the school year a week, from June 17 to June 24.The school board delayed a vote on the staff recommendation and scheduled last night's hearing to get public comment.
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NEWS
March 18, 2007
Howard County public schools have been closed for four inclement-weather days this year (2006-2007). Originally scheduled to end June 14, the school year, as of now, is to end June 20. Schools will dismiss children three hours early June 18, 19 and 20, with no half-day kindergarten/preschool/RECC. June 12, 13 and 14 will now be regular school days with no early dismissals. The schedule might be adjusted if schools are closed for additional inclement-weather days. The school calendar provides for six inclement-weather makeup days of which four have been used.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | November 18, 1990
Think extending the school calendar by 20 days is a good idea?If so, you're out of step with the Carroll Board of Education, which has decided to give the state initiative "low priority" when it meets with the county's state delegation next year to develop a legislative package.The state Board of Education proposal to boost the school year from 180 to 200 days over a period of four years, beginning in 1992-1993, was one of four state initiatives Carroll board members discussed with the public and administrators Wednesday.
NEWS
April 20, 2000
THE Carroll County state's attorney has widened the grand jury's investigation of possible financial misconduct by the Board of Education and the county school system. The question arises whether there is substantial basis for criminal indictment from this prolonged inquiry, or whether it simply puts more pressure on the discredited school system to clean up its act. Not that the revelations of missteps and lack of accounting in the construction program haven't stirred public mistrust in the administration and its elected overseers.
NEWS
December 29, 1995
THE CALENDAR for the 1996-97 school year in Carroll County is about to be set. By approving the calendar, the Board of Education will vote to accept the policy of extending the length of school days rather than tacking on additional days at the end of the year to make up for time lost to inclement weather.Given the routine practice of canceling school for the slightest mess on the roads, the three snow days currently scheduled are likely to be insufficient. This year, school has already been canceled twice due to snow and ice. Only one snow day remains on the 1995-'96 calendar, and we can assume that winter has yet to serve up its worst.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
In the end -- and the end is near -- it will be the Baltimore County school board's decision tonight on how to make up time lost to the bad winter weather.As it did two weeks ago, Superintendent Stuart Berger's staff again will recommend making up the time by extending the school day 45 minutes -- the option that staff members think would result in the best quality instruction time, said Deputy Superintendent Anthony Marchione.For nearly two weeks, board members and school administrators have looked to teachers, parents and other county residents for guidance on the best way to make up five "snow days" -- by extending the school day or the school year.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
The Baltimore County school board is to decide tonight how the time lost to the bad winter weather will be made up. As it did two weeks ago, Superintendent Stuart Berger's staff again will recommend making up the time by extending the school day 45 minutes -- the option that staff members think would result in the best quality instruction time, said Deputy Superintendent Anthony Marchione.For nearly two weeks, board members and school administrators have looked to teachers, parents and other county residents for guidance on the best way to make up five "snow days" -- by extending the school day or the school year.
NEWS
June 13, 1994
JESSICA RAE GUYNN, 16, daughter of Judy and Gary Guynn of Piney Creek Road in Taneytown.School: Sophomore at Francis Scott Key High School.Honored for: Being elected by the Carroll County Student Government Association to represent it on the Carroll County Board of Education for the next 12 months. She also is president of the sophomore class at Key.Jessica's votes are recorded, but don't count toward board decisions. She and other students are hoping for a change in that policy. Some counties in Maryland allow their student representatives to have a vote.
NEWS
April 3, 1994
Too Much Hassle, Too Little Gain"Howard County schools are closed for inclement weather." These words brought joy to Howard County students and terror to their parents. The school board, however, got headaches. Faced with an unprecedented number of snow days to make up, and restraints on time, the committee was forced to extend the school day for half an hour for four weeks and extend the school year until June 17 for all non-graduating students. This solution may not be the best compromise.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1994
The Baltimore County school board postponed last night action on a proposal to extend the school day by 45 minutes during most of the spring to make up for time lost to the weather.The board agreed to hold a hearing on the proposal before voting at its March 22 meeting. It did not set a time or date for the hearing.Most board members seemed to favor the extended day proposed by Superintendent Stuart Berger for 40 days beginning April 5, but Calvin Disney, the board's vice president, asked for more time to discuss alternatives.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Jean Thompson and Stephen Henderson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
The new Baltimore City school board unveiled last night a set of goals that gives purpose to the academic proposals the board had already collected from interim schools chief Robert E. Schiller, parents, teachers and administrators.All students would read by third grade and be proficient in math by fifth grade, according to the board's vision.Schools would be safe, clean and orderly and would boast lower dropout rates.Classrooms would be staffed by talented and dedicated teachers, and students with special needs would receive the services and instruction they need.
NEWS
December 29, 1995
THE CALENDAR for the 1996-97 school year in Carroll County is about to be set. By approving the calendar, the Board of Education will vote to accept the policy of extending the length of school days rather than tacking on additional days at the end of the year to make up for time lost to inclement weather.Given the routine practice of canceling school for the slightest mess on the roads, the three snow days currently scheduled are likely to be insufficient. This year, school has already been canceled twice due to snow and ice. Only one snow day remains on the 1995-'96 calendar, and we can assume that winter has yet to serve up its worst.
NEWS
June 13, 1994
JESSICA RAE GUYNN, 16, daughter of Judy and Gary Guynn of Piney Creek Road in Taneytown.School: Sophomore at Francis Scott Key High School.Honored for: Being elected by the Carroll County Student Government Association to represent it on the Carroll County Board of Education for the next 12 months. She also is president of the sophomore class at Key.Jessica's votes are recorded, but don't count toward board decisions. She and other students are hoping for a change in that policy. Some counties in Maryland allow their student representatives to have a vote.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Anne Haddad and Lan Nguyen contributed to this article | May 23, 1994
Teachers are exhausted. Students are bushed. Parents are even more worn out than usual.A new strain of spring fever is afflicting nearly everyone associated with schools in Baltimore, Carroll and Howard counties. Those are the districts that decided that a few minutes a day in April and May were better than a few days in June for making up class time lost to ice and snow this winter.But those few minutes add up to a lot of fatigue."The only thing we see now -- and it's a cumulative effect -- is the kids are tired, and the teachers are tired," said Dorothy Mangle, elementary education director in Carroll County.
NEWS
April 3, 1994
Too Much Hassle, Too Little Gain"Howard County schools are closed for inclement weather." These words brought joy to Howard County students and terror to their parents. The school board, however, got headaches. Faced with an unprecedented number of snow days to make up, and restraints on time, the committee was forced to extend the school day for half an hour for four weeks and extend the school year until June 17 for all non-graduating students. This solution may not be the best compromise.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
In the end -- and the end is near -- it will be the Baltimore County school board's decision tonight on how to make up time lost to the bad winter weather.As it did two weeks ago, Superintendent Stuart Berger's staff again will recommend making up the time by extending the school day 45 minutes -- the option that staff members think would result in the best quality instruction time, said Deputy Superintendent Anthony Marchione.For nearly two weeks, board members and school administrators have looked to teachers, parents and other county residents for guidance on the best way to make up five "snow days" -- by extending the school day or the school year.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Jean Thompson and Stephen Henderson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
The new Baltimore City school board unveiled last night a set of goals that gives purpose to the academic proposals the board had already collected from interim schools chief Robert E. Schiller, parents, teachers and administrators.All students would read by third grade and be proficient in math by fifth grade, according to the board's vision.Schools would be safe, clean and orderly and would boast lower dropout rates.Classrooms would be staffed by talented and dedicated teachers, and students with special needs would receive the services and instruction they need.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Anne Haddad and Lan Nguyen contributed to this article | May 23, 1994
Teachers are exhausted. Students are bushed. Parents are even more worn out than usual.A new strain of spring fever is afflicting nearly everyone associated with schools in Baltimore, Carroll and Howard counties. Those are the districts that decided that a few minutes a day in April and May were better than a few days in June for making up class time lost to ice and snow this winter.But those few minutes add up to a lot of fatigue."The only thing we see now -- and it's a cumulative effect -- is the kids are tired, and the teachers are tired," said Dorothy Mangle, elementary education director in Carroll County.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
The Baltimore County school board is to decide tonight how the time lost to the bad winter weather will be made up. As it did two weeks ago, Superintendent Stuart Berger's staff again will recommend making up the time by extending the school day 45 minutes -- the option that staff members think would result in the best quality instruction time, said Deputy Superintendent Anthony Marchione.For nearly two weeks, board members and school administrators have looked to teachers, parents and other county residents for guidance on the best way to make up five "snow days" -- by extending the school day or the school year.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1994
Baltimore County parents and teachers made it clear last night that there is no one best solution to make up five "snow days" this school year.The 23 people who spoke during an hourlong public hearing were split almost evenly between extending the school year and a longer school day.A few speakers who suggested extending the school day wanted the longer hours split -- half in the morning and half in the afternoon.Superintendent Stuart Berger's staff recommended last week that the school day be lengthened by 45 minutes from April 5 to May 31 rather than extending the school year a week, from June 17 to June 24.The school board delayed a vote on the staff recommendation and scheduled last night's hearing to get public comment.
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