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By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff sVB | September 25, 1991
Robert Simpson, 35, worked as a mechanic for Duralite Truck Body & Container Co. for 14 years before the company went bankrupt after 42 years in business. The small firm manufactured truck bodies.He was unemployed for two years before finding a job as a shipping and receiving clerk. He was laid off from that job in March.He received his last unemployment check last Thursday for $211 a week. At Duralite, he made about $400 a week, he said."Our president says there is no emergency in this country but he has to be a fool to say that," said Simpson, who is married and has three children ages 8, 11 and 13. "All he has to do is ask the thousands of people that are out of work."
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
Emergency unemployment benefits will expire Saturday for more than 25,000 out-of-work Marylanders, with thousands more projected to run out in the first half of next year unless Congress decides to reverse course and approve an extension. Wenetha Leslie, a 32-year-old mother from Lauraville, will be among the casualties if she can't find a job in the coming weeks. "It's traumatic and it's heart-wrenching, not knowing how you're going to support your family," said Leslie, who's been out of work since June and looking for opportunities to work with at-risk children and teens.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
Emergency unemployment benefits will expire Saturday for more than 25,000 out-of-work Marylanders, with thousands more projected to run out in the first half of next year unless Congress decides to reverse course and approve an extension. Wenetha Leslie, a 32-year-old mother from Lauraville, will be among the casualties if she can't find a job in the coming weeks. "It's traumatic and it's heart-wrenching, not knowing how you're going to support your family," said Leslie, who's been out of work since June and looking for opportunities to work with at-risk children and teens.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 10, 2012
The Baltimore Sun It hasn't received much attention, but there's a provision in the Maryland Dream Act, up for your approval or rejection on the November ballot, that extends a benefit to veterans. Voters ought to take note of it, because if we vote down the college tuition break for young adults who came here as undocumented immigrants, we'll be saying nay to a generous provision for men and women who served in our military, too. Says right there, in the last phrase of Question 4 on the statewide ballot: The Dream Act "extends the time in which honorably discharged veterans may qualify for in-state tuition rates.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Albert Hall, a laid-off Baltimore truck driver and bricklayer's helper, came to Congress yesterday to say that 26 weeks of unemployment benefits won't cut it."I can't live my life on 26 weeks," said 33-year-old Mr. Hall, whose benefits and pay from a part-time janitorial job of three months bring in $230 every two weeks.Mr. Hall was joined by more than a dozen other laid-off workers from Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York who said the current benefits limit for most states expires before they can find a decent job."
NEWS
November 16, 1991
* Jobless Marylanders who have used up their 26 weeks of unemployment benefits will start getting an extra 13 weeks of payments by Thanksgiving.* Extended benefits could help up to 40,000 Marylanders who have exhausted their benefits since March 1, when the extra coverage takes effect, and those whose benefits will run out by July 4.* The state unemployment insurance office is mailing notices to Maryland claimants who could qualify.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | March 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The congressional Joint Economic Committee, headed by Maryland Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, today urged the Federal Reserve to lower interest rates as a means of alleviating the recession."
NEWS
By JOHN FAIRHALL | August 4, 1991
With her unemployment benefits about to run out, Lisa Williams was pleading for help. She stood outside the U.S. Department of Labor in Washington with many other people in the same fix and demonstrated for extended benefits.The 28-year-old Baltimore woman had worked on the census for the U.S. Department of Commerce and before that had held a job with the YWCA. Now, no one seemed to be lhiring. Ms. Williamas, who is single, wondered how she'd make ends meet."Frankly, I really don't know," she said.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | December 14, 1991
Maryland's unemployment office has been flooded over the past two weeks with claims for extended 13-week benefits, but the agency says it has been working overtime to pay everyone who qualifies for the extra payments approved by Congress last month."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Every month, a quarter of a million jobless Americans run out of state unemployment benefits. And every month, the federal government bails them out by extending the benefits for as much as another half-year.No more.Come Oct. 2, the federal government will stop paying emergency benefits to Americans who have been out of work for more than six months.After that date, hundreds of thousands of unemployed workers who exhaust their state-paid benefits each month no longer will have a federal safety net to fall into.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | July 18, 2012
I think we can all agree the NFL is one of the greatest money-making machines of all time. The 32 teams generated close to $9 billion in revenue last year. Forbes magazine puts the average team's worth at $1 billion. Commissioner Roger Goodell makes $20 million a year. New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees signed a five-year contract worth $100 million. Ray Rice just agreed to a five-year, $40 million deal with the Ravens. I could go on and on. But you get the point. If you're anywhere in the NFL's orbit, you're probably not standing in soup lines.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Beginning in January, Baltimore County will grant health care benefits to spouses of employees in same-sex marriages if they are legally married in other states, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced Thursday. The decision comes a month after an arbitrator ruled in favor of two county police officers whose same-sex spouses had been denied benefits by the county in August 2010. County officials had 30 days to decide whether to appeal the arbitrator's ruling, which said the county had violated the women's union contract.
NEWS
November 27, 2011
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz shouldn't require more than a nanosecond to dismiss any notion of appealing an independent arbitrator's ruling that two Baltimore County police officers should not be denied health benefits for their same-sex spouses. That the county chose to deny that coverage in the first place is a mistake of the previous administration that need not be repeated. County residents may recall that it was nearly two years ago that Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler issued a letter stating that Maryland should recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 3, 2011
Look for a letter that went out over the weekend from the Maryland Labor Department to find out if you're eligible for extended unemployment benefits.  The state says it will provide another 13 weeks of federal benefits to about 58,000 unemployed residents. Jobless workers were already entitled to 26 weeks of benefits - which has been the standard in Maryland - plus another 47 weeks through emergency unemployment compensation during this economic crisis. To be eligible, according to state officials, you must be unemployed and meet the requirements of the Extended Benefits law, which require a higher level of job hunting.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
The proposed Washington compromise on tax cuts and extending unemployment benefits will pump billions more in federal dollars into Maryland's and Howard County's economy, a prominent local economist says, but the bill for that short-term gain will eventually come due. "To me, this is quite bad news for Maryland," Anirban Basu of Sage Policy Group told more than 200 local business leaders gathered at an annual Howard County Chamber of Commerce economic...
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
Thousands of Marylanders face being cut off from unemployment benefits next month — just in time for the holiday season — as Congress remains undecided on whether to extend the payments in one of the worst job markets in decades. An estimated 2 million people nationwide are slated to lose benefits, including 14,000 in Maryland. And more than 30,000 laid-off Maryland residents will exhaust their benefits early next year. The phase-out is happening because a federally funded program that gave residents payments beyond the normal 26 weeks lapses on Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Derek Lick and Derek Lick,States News Service | September 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Saying the recession continues to strangle unemployed Americans, Sen. Paul Sarbanes of Maryland and other Senate Democratic leaders have reintroduced a bill that would extend unemployment benefits to jobless Americans.The bill is identical to one that was approved by Congress in August and signed by President Bush but never funded because the president refused to declare the budget emergency required to release the $5.3 billion needed to extend benefits by as many as 20 weeks.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer broke from his fellow Democratic governors urging President Bush to sign a measure extending benefits to the unemployed because he prefers that Congress and the president find a solution not adding to the federal deficit, a spokesman for the governor said yesterday.Mr. Schaefer's 27 Democratic colleagues wrote the president and urged him to sign a bill that would declare an economic emergency and offer up to 20 extra weeks of unemployment benefits to some 3 million Americans who have exhausted their regular 26 weeks of benefits.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
Surviving spouses of firefighters and police officers who served fewer than 20 years would receive a higher baseline pension under a bill introduced by two Baltimore City Council members Monday night. Under a major pension overhaul passed earlier this year, widows and widowers of those who served at least 20 years are paid at least $16,000 a year. The bill, which was introduced by Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke and Councilman James B. Kraft, at the request of the Fraternal Order of Police and the firefighters' unions, would extend that minimum to any current surviving spouse of a public safety office.
NEWS
July 12, 2010
The nation's jobless have rarely been treated so callously. As of today, another 3,500 unemployed Marylanders will see their benefits expire, bringing the total to nearly 12,000 in similar straits since Congress chose not to extend benefits last month. In all, nearly 2 million unemployed Americans have seen their benefits run out. The public should be outraged by the Senate's failure to extend temporary jobless benefits. Unemployment is still hovering at 9.3 percent, and jobs are hard to find.
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