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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | December 6, 2009
The Annapolis Police Department is holding an open house Tuesday for its law enforcement Explorer program. The program is open to boys and girls who have completed eighth grade and are at least 14 years old, or are between the ages of 15 and 21. The program has hands-on activities, helps teenagers gain insight into law enforcement careers and promotes personal development. The open house will start at 7 p.m. at the Annapolis Police Headquarters, 199 Taylor Ave., Annapolis. Anyone younger than 18 must be accompanied by a parent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
They have so much in common, these three long-dead holy women, their corpses dripping with jewels, that it's as though they've been calling back and forth to one another from across the centuries. Now that their images are in the same room at the American Visionary Art Museum , the murmur of their voices is almost audible. There's St. Kateri, holding a bouquet of her talisman - lilies - and reciting the Lord's Prayer in the Mohawk language. Embedded in the icon is a vial of water taken from the spring where Kateri lived in the 17th century.
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NEWS
By Lesa Jansen and Lesa Jansen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 16, 2002
A MOUNT AIRY couple with a love of working with children, and a large defense contractor with a desire to become involved in public service have teamed to provide area youngsters with a learning opportunity. The Explorers is a youth organization for high school students. The group falls under the umbrella of Boy Scouts of America, but also is open to girls. Four years ago, defense giant Lockheed Martin called on its employees to become involved in public service projects. The Gaithersburg company decided to sponsor an Explorers post and needed adult advisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When the writer Peter Mehlman was working on the television show "Seinfeld," he could be counted on to come up with the tiniest, most insignificant - and ultimately, the most memorable - plots. It was Mehlman, now 58 and a Los Angeles resident, who explored snack-eating etiquette at parties, and Mehlman who decided that the show's female lead, Elaine, would hoard contraceptive sponges. And it was Mehlman who coined several catchphrases that have entered the cultural lexicon, from "yada yada" to gloss over a conversation, "sponge-worthy" to describe a hot date and "double-dipping" to refer to the practice of dunking a snack into a sauce at a party, taking a bite and then dunking it again into the same container.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis | July 8, 1996
INTERNET USERS OFTEN talk about exploring the World Wide Web, and the analogy is a good one. The Web is a vast, unmapped region with exotic scenery, strange languages and customs, hidden treasures, dark alleys and treacherous technological jungles and rapids.For armchair explorers, the Web is the most thrilling communications medium since the crystal radios that allowed my father's generation to eavesdrop on the conversations of heroes like the pilot Wylie Post, as he barnstormed the North Pole more than half a century ago.The Web, along with such relatively recent gear as lightweight portable computers, digital cameras and radio and satellite telephones, now enables us to participate in grand adventures as they happen on land, sea, air and in space.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | April 17, 1995
Have you ever noticed the seasonal change affects our mood?Look around your workplace and community. If the weather outside is delightful, co-workers and neighbors are upbeat. When the weather turns cold and damp, our moods take a downward turn.Let's all think spring and be confident that it is here to stay.*With spring thoughts in mind, let's think about outdoor activities.The Sea Explorers, a nationwide co-educational program for young adults ages 14 to 20, is designed to incorporate character building, citizenship training and fitness in youths through maritime skills and outdoor activities.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
When a police officer visited Karen Slack's eighth-grade clas to discuss a new law enforcement program for young people, he piqued her interest immediately. But as she approached him to learn more about the Police Explorer program, a boy interrupted her and yelled: "It's just for boys, you can't join."But Ms. Slack, now 18, didn't let the doubts of others stop her. "A lot of people laugh in my face, and say, 'you can't do that, you're a girl,'" she said. "But that only makes me want to be a cop even more."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 8, 1993
Public television visits Johns Hopkins Hospital for the second time this week.On Monday, PBS launched its "Medicine at the Crossroads" series with a look at how medical doctors are trained at Hopkins. At 8 tonight, "The New Explorers" series profiles cardiac surgeon Levi Watkins Jr. in a half-hour segment titled "A Dream Fulfilled" on MPT (Channels 22 and 67).For those not familiar with "The New Explorers," its host is Bill Kurtis, a TV anchorman in Chicago. It often features individuals pushing the boundaries of science.
FEATURES
June 18, 1998
"The New Explorers" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-2 a.m., A&E) notes that every three seconds somewhere on Earth there is a sighting of an unidentified flying object. In "Bringing UFOs Down to Earth," host Bill Kurtis and his team head out to investigate two sighting reports -- one on the edge of a rain forest in Brazil and the other in the town of Puebla, Mexico. Both believers and skeptics are interviewed before Kurtis draws his own conclusions.At a glance"C-16" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2000
ALUMNI FROM THE old Brooklyn Park High School had many jobs to complete on the morning of the Drug and Alcohol Resistance and Education (DARE) celebration at the new Brooklyn Park Middle School. There were stands to be built, straw to be laid and pumpkins to unload. Unloading and carrying the 8-foot display tables in time for the arrival of vendors seemed nearly impossible. Then six teens dressed in blue arrived on the scene. They quickly unloaded and placed the tables, and prepared the displays.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The Howard County Library System will hold its seventh annual Choose Civility symposium "The Ball's in Your Court: Can Civility and Sports Co-Exist?" from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, at the Miller branch in Ellicott City. Korva Coleman of National Public Radio will moderate a panel discussion exploring teamwork, leadership, role models, sportsmanship and competition in kindergarten through 12th grade. Joe Ehrmann, a former Baltimore Colts defensive lineman who is now a sports educator with Coach for America, a minister and the author of "InSideOut Coaching: How Sports Can Transform Lives," will be the featured speaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
It all started with a number: 49. Peter Bruun, a Copenhagen, Denmark-born artist who has made Baltimore his home since 1987, created a series of 49 drawings two years ago. "I thought at the time that they were simple sketches," Bruun says. "I then realized that I was 49, soon to turn 50. No one would know looking at those 49 drawings that they addressed life passing, but that's what I saw in them - the dawning awareness that you have a life behind you, and a finite horizon ahead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
In a letter to his father, a 25-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart declared: "I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. … I simply follow my own feelings. " This self-confidence is just one of the revered composer's traits explored in Peter Shaffer's play "Amadeus," which Center Stage is reviving for its season-opener. A few other Mozart characteristics, including behavior still not considered kosher in polite society, also pepper this colorful mix of fact and fiction.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Seventy miles off Ocean City , scientists aboard the federal research vessel Henry B. Bigelow are exploring a lush underwater landscape that until recently few would have imagined - colorful corals clinging to the rocky slopes of deep-sea canyons. On this and other research cruises, remotely guided submersible cameras have captured scenes of bubblegum corals, sea whips and more growing in the dark, hundreds to thousands of feet below the Atlantic Ocean's surface. Other smaller patches dot the ocean floor in shallower waters closer to shore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
It was the eeriness of the situation that struck Baltimore writer Dan Fesperman. Drone pilots for the Air Force would spend weeks watching what amounted to a real-life silent movie of a small town thousands of miles away - all the while plotting the destruction of some of the inhabitants. Fesperman interviewed drone operators stationed at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada while doing research for his ninth thriller, "Unmanned," which is being released Wednesday. Most drone operators, he found, are former elite fighter pilots.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | May 17, 1991
MIAMI -- The Bermuda Triangle is an endangered legend.Ten miles northeast of the Fort Lauderdale coast, deep-sea explorers have discovered the wreckage of five TBM Avengers -- the same number and type of Navy airplanes belonging to Flight 19, the famous "Lost Patrol" that vanished mysteriously in December 1945.The planes are clustered together within a one-mile radius on the ocean floor in about 600 feet of water, said salvor Robert Cervoni, managing director of Scientific Search Project of New York.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Eight Democratic members of Maryland's congressional delegation wrote President Obama Monday urging him to reconsider his administration's plan to allow seismic testing for oil and gas off the mid-Atlantic coast. In a jointly signed letter, the eight called seismic testing the first major step toward opening the Atlantic Ocean to offshore drilling, which carries the risk of oil spills. But they warned that the tests themselves would be "incredibly harmful to marine mammals and fisheries in the region," generating "dynamite-like" blasts of compressed air underwater that could hurt whales, dolphins and fish.
HEALTH
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
At Cathy Rees' yoga class, you won't see anyone attempt a downward-facing dog — many participants are in wheelchairs, and almost all of them suffer from dementia. Instead, Rees has adapted the principles of yoga, which aims to align the body's seven chakras, or points of energy, to the abilities of the residents of Copper Ridge, a center for dementia care in Sykesville. Her yoga class, now in its fourth month, is an experiment of sorts. A handful of studies have suggested that yoga can be used to improve the overall physical and mental well-being of dementia patients, so Rees wants to craft a dementia-specific yoga program that can be studied and refined by researchers.
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