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NEWS
September 18, 2012
Letter writer Al Eisner betrayed his political bias ("Libya attack a direct result of Obama foreign policy weakness," Sept. 16) when he characterized President's Barack Obama's Middle East foreign policy as "left-wing" and "weak" - the partisan talking point of the Republican Party. Those who keep up with political comments from the Middle East know that the rioters constituted but a handful of extremists - in the mere hundreds. In Egypt, the young revolutionaries who overthrew Hosni Mubarak were noticeably absent from the demonstration.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Allan Vought and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Durbar II has been shocking people for more than a century. When the 3-year-old, French-bred, American-owned Thoroughbred won England's prestigious Epsom Derby in 1914, despite going off as a 20-1 long shot, the genteel world of English horse-racing was turned upside-down. When he made it out of war-torn Paris in the early days of World War I, at a time when many horses were being pressed into military service, he again bucked the odds. And today, when people hear that this famed Thoroughbred is buried in Bel Air, on the grounds of Harford Community College - well, it's safe to say that's news to most Harford County residents.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 11, 2011
In the wake of the horrendous shooting rampage in Tucson, Ariz., why isn't anyone talking about banning "Mein Kampf"? Or "The Communist Manifesto"? Or for that matter, "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "The Phantom Tollbooth"? After all, unlike Sarah Palin's absurdly infamous Facebook map with crosshairs on congressional districts that some pundits have blamed for the violence, we have some evidence — suspect Jared Lee Loughner's own words — that these books were a direct influence on him. And to listen to partisan ghouls such as Keith Olbermann exploiting this horrific crime, any rhetoric or writing or images that contributed to it must be stopped, and those who don't accept blame and then repent (specifically Ms. Palin)
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 1, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - Three times last week, Ohio State defensive backs were left looking at the back of Cincinnati wide receiver Chris Moore's jersey as Moore crossed the goal line at the end of a long touchdown catch-and-run. Ohio State (3-1) is great in the front seven. The Buckeyes have experienced players at linebacker, and their defensive line may be as good as any in the country. The pass defense is Ohio State's "Achilles' heel," said Buckeyes coach Urban Meyer during a teleconference Tuesday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 6, 2003
Ellicott City native Dave Johnson was voted off Survivor: The Amazon after 24 days and the ousting of seven other players, a fact revealed in the episode that aired Thursday night. "It has been an experience to beat all other experiences," said Johnson in a telephone interview Friday. The 24-year-old mechanical engineer, who lives in Pasadena, Calif., and builds equipment for NASA, did well living day to day in the rainforest. An experienced hiker, biker and backpacker, he also made a strong showing in a series of games and physical challenges.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 11, 1994
Paris.--Russia's relationship with the Western powers is fundamentally influenced by relations with what Moscow describes as the ''near abroad.'' Everyone sees this, but not everyone distinguishes between Russia's legitimate interests within the frontiers of what once was the czarist empire and its interests elsewhere.Some in Washington are anxious about renewed Russian imperialism or alleged expansionism, while others want Russia to police the tumultuous ex-U.S.S.R., or even favor an American alliance with Russia ''to contain China.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 26, 2000
Does America need another TV film about the death of JonBenet Ramsey? No. In fact, America doesn't need another word about it. Two weeks ago, we had the sleazy movie treatment of the 1996 murder of the 6-year-old Boulder, Colo., girl by the Fox network. And, now comes a four-hour CBS miniseries, "Perfect Murder, Perfect Town," starring Marg Helgenberger, Ronnie Cox, Ken Howard, Ann-Margret and Kris Kristofferson. Outside of Helgenberger's performance, there is nothing to recommend this film.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1996
Donald F. Cronin, a World War II ace as a Navy fighter pilot, died Sunday of cancer at his home in Mays Chapel. He was 78.His exploits won him the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with three gold stars.He enlisted as a Navy aviation cadet in 1941 after earning a bachelor's degree from Providence College and was commissioned a naval aviator in 1942 at Pensacola, Fla.In 1943 in Virginia, he was assigned to the newly created VF-8 Squadron on board the aircraft carrier Bunker Hill.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
Over lunch of cold lobster at his $300,000 Glenwood home, Philip Manglitz looks distracted. His eyes are dull. His hair is rumpled. He's sweating.Last week, the 48-year-old developer was convicted in U.S. District Court in Baltimore of turning bundles of illicit cash from Howard County's biggest drug ring into subdivision lots in upscale western Howard.Cocky, gregarious and besuited throughout the trial, Manglitz now walks barefoot around his airy house in shorts and a golf shirt -- awaiting his Sept.
NEWS
June 14, 1998
Reg Smythe, 81, who created and drew the politically incorrect comic character Andy Capp for more than 40 years, died of cancer yesterday at his home in northeastern England. The exploits of Andy and his long-suffering wife Flo were syndicated in 1,700 newspapers in 48 countries and even turned into a musical and a TV series.Andy Capp will live on for a while. "Reg was so prolific, there is at least a year's supply of cartoons left," said Ken Layson, cartoon editor for Mirror Group Newspapers in London, which began publishing the strip in 1957.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
At a noisy warehouse off Veterans Highway in Millersville, a young woman concentrates as she pokes black shoelaces into cardboard packaging. In another room, workers slowly count tiny bottles of hair products, placing them in plastic bags that will end up as samples in salons. To some, these workers with developmental disabilities are getting valuable on-the-job-training and the self-respect that comes with employment. Others say they're being exploited - because wages in the facility, run by a nonprofit, are as low as 25 cents an hour.
NEWS
By Krishana Davis | April 25, 2014
Randy Myers might technically be in the business of selling books, but he says he doesn't fret the impact the Internet or e-readers is having on the business, recently opening his second Collector's Corner comic book shop in February in Harford County. “People want to hold [comics] in their hand,” Myers said. “It's the tactile nature of the comic book that gives it more of a chance at surviving the digital age. It's not just the words, but it's the illustrations.” The shop prides itself on its selection of popular titles, such as the widely known series-turned-hit-TV-show “The Walking Dead,” the classic DC and Marvel Comics brands and small stapled comics from obscure indie brands such as Microcosm Publishing.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
Janice Peete-Bey didn't stay long at the Baltimore trade school where she enrolled 25 years ago, leaving after the class seemed useless. But the student loan debt from her noneducation haunts her to this day. Her wages have been garnished, her tax refunds seized. Those payments total more than $13,500 on a loan that was originally $5,600, according to the Reisterstown woman's pro bono attorney, thanks to interest and collections fees that mounted for years. And the school? It closed long ago, and its CEO pleaded guilty to defrauding the government and students by concealing its dropout rate so federal student aid kept flowing.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | June 13, 2013
Recently, there's been a lot of focus on the financial exploitation of older adults. The FTC last month held a one-day workshop on senior identity theft , which highlighted some of the types of ID theft that older adults encounter. Yesterday, the Investor Protection Trust released an online survey of more than 600 doctors and nurses about investment and financial fraud against older adults. The nonprofit IPT offers an Elder Investment Fraud Financial Exploitation program that seeks to train medical professionals to recognize and report cases of elder financial abuse to authorities or others who can help.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Ohio State's Greg Dutton did not get to watch the entirety of Cornell's 16-8 upset of sixth-seeded Maryland in a NCAA tournament first-round game last Sunday. But the junior goalkeeper watched the film, and fifth-year senior attackman Rob Pannell's four-goal, three-assist performance was no less impressive a day or two after the fact. “Rob Pannell is a great player, and he's been a great player there for four years,” said Dutton, a Timonium native and Calvert Hall graduate. “He's probably one of the best players to ever play Division I lacrosse.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
A bill to ban the Maryland Transit Administration's practice of recording conversations on its buses has been filed by two state senators. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, and Allan Kittleman, a Republican representing Howard and Carroll counties, want the MTA to stop installing microphones and deactivate units in use by Oct. 1. "I have spoken to the MTA, and I have a philosophical difference with them," said Brochin. "What I discuss on the bus is nobody's business but my own. " Agency spokesman Terry Owens said the recordings give police additional assistance to investigate incidents and are not being used for surveillance.
SPORTS
January 14, 1992
Now that John Starks has made it big with the Knicks, stories of his college exploits are surfacing:His Oklahoma Junior College team had a game in Independence, Kan., but Starks wasn't there as the bus prepared to leave. It turns out he was getting married. The team went on to its game minus Starks -- but only for a while."John showed up at halftime with his bag and shoes," said Ken Trickey, then OJC coach. "He had cut his reception short and got to Independence in an hour and 45 minutes [normally a 2 1/2 -hour drive from Tulsa]
NEWS
August 11, 1999
John Dortch "Booty" Lewis Sr.,84, a Goldsboro, N.C., insurance executive whose World War II exploits were chronicled in part in the movie "The Great Escape," died Sunday in Goldsboro of pancreatic cancer.He spent almost two years in Germany's Stalag Luft III. That was the prison camp from which prisoners of war tunneled to freedom in an escape later to be made into "The Great Escape," starring Steve McQueen. Many of the exploits portrayed by Mr. McQueen were based on escape attempts and other activities by Mr. Lewis.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 24, 2012
The New York Giants' secondary has been plagued by injuries that have sapped the unit of strong safety Kenny Phillips and cornerback Prince Amukamara for extended periods. But the secondary has been anchored by cornerback Corey Webster (the team leader in pass breakups with nine) and strong safety Stevie Brown (the team leader in interceptions with seven). However, the Ravens appeared to attack the Giants' defensive backfield by exposing Webster on Sunday. When New York went into single coverage, quarterback Joe Flacco usually went after Webster, completing five passes for 88 yards and a 6-yard touchdown to Torrey Smith, two for 45 yards to Anquan Boldin, one for 36 yards to Dennis Pitta, and one for 7 yards to Jacoby Jones.
NEWS
By Ralph Nader and Ken Reed | November 27, 2012
When it comes to college athletics, it's time to speak truth to evil. You might think evil is too strong a word for what's going on in college athletics, but consider how Webster's Dictionary defines evil: morally reprehensible; causing harm; offensive. That pretty much sums up the state of big-time college sports today. The inane move of Maryland and Rutgers to the Big Ten is simply the latest example. Here's the current reality of college sports: •NCAA Division I sports - especially at Football Bowl Subdivision schools - has nothing to do with education.
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