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By Sharon Behn | June 17, 2010
As Congress hears testimony about the handling of the Gulf of Mexico spill, scientists and environmentalists question how prepared the government is to respond if a ship or barge were to leak oil into the Chesapeake Bay. Experts say a quick-fire response is needed to stop oil from spreading in the shallow bay and reaching the shores. "There is no functioning [emergency response] system on the Bay in the terms of what we call operational. …," said William C. Boicourt, an expert in physical oceanographic processes at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science at Horn Point.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Lecturing on the benefits of regular exercise won't change anyone's sedentary habits, but creating an environment that supports routine physical activity will. That's the message that public health, planning and transportation expert Mark Fenton plans to deliver Thursday evening at the Oakland Mills Meeting House at an event open to all county residents. "To Your Health: How Community Design Can Promote Healthy Lifestyles" is co-sponsored by the Columbia Association and the Horizon Foundation.
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HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
State and national experts will take questions about Maryland's health insurance exchange - which is set to begin enrolling new patients next month - at a town hall meeting at the University of Baltimore on Saturday. State-based insurance exchanges were created under the Affordable Care Act in 2010 and will allow some individuals another option to purchase coverage beginning Oct. 1. The meeting, sponsored by Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, will take place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Merrick School of Business, 11 W. Mount Royal Ave. john.fritze@baltsun.com twitter.com/jfritze
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
No parent wants to be in a position to use it, but child-safety experts agree that learning infant and child CPR is a must for every mother and father. "It's one skill that just doesn't come naturally to caregivers. It's a learned technique," says Lanny Dowell, Greater Baltimore Medical Center's parent education and doula coordinator. Courses are offered by many local hospitals and through the American Red Cross. First aid for choking is also taught in CPR classes. And some are combined with training on using defibrillators or with adult CPR. While parents can watch a video for instruction, it's helpful to practice on a mannequin, experts say. "Most people learn by doing," says Sarah Sherman, training center coordinator for the American Heart Association at Howard County General Hospital in Columbia.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | January 2, 2006
BOSTON -- This is the week when wise men bearing gifts are replaced by wise guys bearing lists. The news is full of the Best and Worst, the Ins and Outs, the Screw-ups and Fess-ups of 2005, not to mention the Predictions for 2006. In 2005, our mistakes seemed piddling compared with the whoppers made in the name of Katrina and Iraq, Harriet Miers and Judith Miller. Thus, for assorted reasons, we break from our Media Culpa awards to take a jaundiced overview of the entire field of experts, those whose punditry and predictions are preparing you for 2006.
NEWS
By Linda DeMers Hummel | November 17, 1993
THEY appear in our mailbox almost as often as L.L. Bean and Victoria's Secrets catalogs: page after glossy page of advertisements for books, manuals, audio and video tapes that will improve me. If I call the 800 number and order, I can reduce stress, improve my professional image, maximize my impact, lose weight, assert myself, stop procrastinating, repair my marriage or find a man (or woman) to marry me. All of this without ever leaving my home.These are the experts, and it's a funny thing about experts these days.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 15, 2003
FAIRFAX, Va. - The defense team for teen-age sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo asked a judge yesterday to authorize hiring a battery of experts to assist in the capital murder trial, due to start here in November. Malvo, 18, faces the possibility of execution if convicted of killing FBI analyst Linda Franklin, 47, in the parking lot of a Home Depot store in the Seven Corners section of Fairfax County on Oct. 14. Yesterday, his lawyers asked Fairfax County Circuit Judge Jane M. Roush to appoint and authorize court funding for DNA experts and independent DNA testing of evidence, and a social worker or other expert to help gather information for an expected request to spare Malvo's life if he is convicted.
BUSINESS
By James T. Madore and James T. Madore,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2003
Martha Stewart's company, stung by her indictment two weeks ago, has not done enough to distance itself from her as a part of a strategy to prosper again, experts said yesterday. Stewart resigned as chief executive and chairwoman of the board of directors June 4, hours after pleading not guilty to federal charges of lying to investigators who were investigating her December 2001 sale of stock in drug maker ImClone Systems Inc. Stewart's successors are a longtime company executive and money manager.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | July 20, 1994
If there's a lack of balance in the news coverage of the O.J. Simpson affair, it shows in the choice of legal experts and commentators hired by the TV networks.There are a few prosecutors and judges. But most of the experts are criminal defense lawyers who gained fame and wealth by winning freedom for assorted nasties and slimeballs.Because they are defense-minded, they see the trial as an elaborate game in which motions to suppress evidence and aiming zingy questions at nervous witnesses are more important than getting at the truth.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 28, 1994
Six months ago, the nation's diabetes experts made a sensational announcement. By following a strict medical regimen, they said, diabetics can measurably slow the onset and maybe even avert the dire complications of the disease.The threat of blindness, kidney failure, heart attack or amputation, they proclaimed, could be greatly reduced or virtually eliminated.Diabetes centers across the nation geared up for an onslaught of patients wanting to begin the new treatment. They hired more staff, put in extra telephone lines, prepared educational materials and ordered the home monitoring devices that would allow diabetics to test their blood sugar from four to 10 times a day.The blood sugar tests are a crucial part of the tight-control regimen that the study, which followed 1,441 patients with Type I diabetes for nine years, found to be clearly beneficial to diabetics.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | September 16, 2014
It's almost hard to get your arms around. Three years ago, the Orioles were a divisional doormat with a 14-year losing streak and a frustrated fan base that didn't know if the franchise would ever figure out which way was up. Six months ago, they were a projected third-place team - at best - with a one-dimensional offense and a questionable pitching staff. Today, they are American League East champions and they are headed for the postseason with a chance to reach the World Series for the first time since 1983.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
With school back in session, parents are breathing a collective sigh of relief. No more wet bathing suits on the bedroom floor or kids begging for snacks at 15-minute intervals. But the school year brings its own set of challenges, many of which arrive in children's homework folders. Every assignment - from daily math homework to science projects with months of lead time - raises an important question: How much should parents help their children with schoolwork? The answer, according to area educators, is that it varies: Every assignment is different, and so is every child.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
When federal databases containing sensitive information on U.S. intelligence or nuclear weapons come under cyberattack, the agencies call on major companies like Lockheed Martin, Verizon and Booz Allen Hamilton - as well as a two-year-old startup in Federal Hill - to shore up defenses. Maddrix LLC is among seven companies to be the first ones accredited in a new National Security Agency vetting program. The firms use complex data analysis and digital forensics to root out invaders that are lurking or have left behind tracks during their intrusions.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 21, 2014
Angus Phillips, an inveterate Annapolis-area crabber, joined my call for a moratorium on the harvest of blue crabs from the Chesapeake Bay. "The time has come," he wrote in The Washington Post last month, "to stop pussyfooting around and shut down crabbing for a few years, to give the delectable crustaceans a chance to recover the way geese, yellow perch and rockfish did. " Phillips wrote about fishing and hunting for 30-plus years at The Post...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Dr. Peter O. Kwiterovich Jr., an internationally known expert on lipid disorders who was the founder and director of the Johns Hopkins Lipid Clinic and was an early advocate for routine cholesterol screening in children, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Roland Park home. He was 74. "We have lost a true giant in the field of cardiovascular disease. He was one of the quiet pioneers at Hopkins," said Dr. George J. Dover, pediatrician-in-chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital and director of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By Thomas Neas, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Vacant buildings are many things: signs of decay, eyesores and dangerous. They might also hold a strong relationship to crime. According to frequently updated data provided by Open Baltimore, there is a strong correlation between vacant buildings and certain crimes, such as shootings and homicides. Common assault, a physical attack, increases from neighborhood to neighborhood as the number of vacant houses increases — a trend shared with crime in general. And it does so at a much more pronounced rate than other crimes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
A town meeting to discuss youth violence drew a small crowd in Columbia last night, but U.S. Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin had a message for those who stayed away."
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
It might have been honor. It might have been fear. Or even self-interest. Possibly, all motivated PepsiCo officials to turn in those who tried to sell the company a secret new beverage recipe belonging to archrival Coca-Cola Co. Whatever the company's reasons, several experts in business ethics and intellectual property say they are not surprised that Pepsi didn't take the bait. Many say they would expect other large companies to refuse if offered their chief competitor's trade secrets.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Closing arguments are expected Tuesday in the trial of an off-duty New Jersey police officer accused of murdering a Lansdowne man following a road-rage incident last summer in Anne Arundel County During the final day of testimony in Circuit Court on Monday, two law enforcement experts offered opposite opinions as to whether Joseph Lamont Walker, 41, acted reasonably in shooting Joseph Dale Harvey Jr., 36, on the side of Route 3 near Interstate 97...
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
The $190 million settlement for former patients of Dr. Nikita Levy might be eye-popping, but it won't overwhelm the wealthy Johns Hopkins Health System. Hopkins officials said the payout, which received preliminary court approval Monday, would be covered by insurance and wouldn't affect patient care. Officials declined to provide more information on insurance policies and finances. Industry experts said that while Hopkins is likely to take a financial hit - through covering payments with cash reserves if self-insured and through higher insurance premiums - the institution has the means to handle it. Hopkins settled with former patients of Levy, who authorities say secretly recorded patients during gynecologic exams.
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