Advertisement
HomeCollectionsExpertise
IN THE NEWS

Expertise

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 18, 2013
Collaboratively administrate empowered markets via plug-and-play networks. Dynamically procrastinate B2C users after installed base benefits. Dramatically visualize customer directed convergence without revolutionary ROI. Efficiently unleash cross-media information without cross-media value. Quickly maximize timely deliverables for real-time schemas. Dramatically maintain clicks-and-mortar solutions without functional solutions. Completely synergize resource sucking relationships via premier niche markets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 19, 2014
The Grille at Peerce's, a longtime Phoenix favorite that overlooks Loch Raven Reservoir on Dulaney Valley Road, tapped the chef from another longtime Baltimore County institution to lead its kitchen last month. Marco Lombardini, a Cockeysville resident whose family owned the Candle Light Inn in Catonsville for more than 30 years before selling the building at the end of 2013, began three weeks ago as executive chef at the Grille at Peerce's. "As soon as I met him, I knew there was a connection," said Joe Bivona, owner of the Grille at Peerce's.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- One of the enduring myths of political life in Washington is that success in foreign policy requires some special and arcane expertise on the part of a president. That argument is always advanced to support the candidacy of someone who has served in the Senate, the premise being that senators deal with these global issues all the time.The myth is just that, however. For one thing, many senators don't know much more about foreign policy than your barber. Unless they have served for years on the Foreign Relations Committee, their putative expertise is often derived from serving on a few delegations traveling abroad.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
The effort to focus the post O'Malley era in Maryland on developing private sector businesses and jobs got a big boost Friday from the unprecedented joint agenda of House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller. It's encouraging that the two top leaders in the General Assembly are both focused on the issue at the same time that most of the candidates for governor next year are talking about the same thing and private sector advocacy groups like the Greater Baltimore Committee are pursuing similar efforts.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1991, TPG Communications | September 23, 1991
I egged on the testy exchange, asking a friend, a former policeman, what he thought about Los Angeles' Daryl Gates affair. While he certainly didn't cheer the police beating of Rodney King, he defended Gates vigorously. The problem, he made clear (in a way intended to make me shrivel), was that I could never begin to comprehend what it's like out on the mean streets, night after night.He's right, of course. Moreover, I am in awe of policemen who do have the gumption to patrol some very hot spots.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 14, 2001
SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Intel Corp., the world's biggest maker of computer chips, said yesterday that it will hire most of the employees from a Hewlett-Packard Co. unit that builds chip sets for server computers that run Web sites. The workers, part of the Cupertino Systems Lab, will join Intel on Sept. 24, Intel spokesman Robert Manetta said. Hewlett-Packard is closing the group, which has fewer than 100 people, Manetta said, noting that Intel offered jobs to the entire group and "virtually all" accepted.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and C. Fraser Smith and Peter Jensen and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
Maryland Senate Minority Leader John A. Cade, whose booming voice, bearish size and budget expertise made him one of the General Assembly's most respected and influential members, died yesterday after suffering an apparent heart attack.Cade, 67, a resident of Severna Park, was a force to be reckoned with on the Budget and Taxation Committee and on the Senate floor. A fiscal conservative and social moderate, the former Marine was gruff, blunt, smart, tough and almost never reluctant to share his opinion.
NEWS
April 5, 1999
Names in the newsDana Mayer has joined Crosby Marketing Communications as a vice president and leader of a new division called the Strategic Advisory Group for Employers, which will combine communications expertise with organizational development techniques.Pub Date: 4/05/99
NEWS
By Providence (R.I.) Journal-Bulletin | January 11, 1991
JUST AS campaign finance reform laws in the 1970s led to unanticipated PAC abuses in the 1980s, the Ethics Reform Act of 1989 already seems to be having unhealthy side-effects.One of these is an exodus of talented employees from federal service. The former drug czar William Bennett recently declined to become chairman of the Republican National Committee because, as of Jan. 1, he would have been barred from honoring a book contract. . . .Bennett is not the only one to encounter these new regulations.
NEWS
July 29, 1997
Sykesville applies for state expertise on downtown revitalization projectSykesville has applied for the state's Neighborhood Revitalization Designation, hoping for technical assistance on its downtown project."
NEWS
By Buzz McClain | November 18, 2013
The first thing you need to know about snow tubing is that it's exhausting. The second thing is that it's a ton of snow-bound fun, no matter how old you are. The folks at regional ski resorts realized several years ago not everyone is capable of, or enjoys, skiing and snowboarding but perhaps those people still want to join in the wintry thrills. Snow tubing is the solution. It requires no skill other than the ability to sit on a large recreational tube with handles; you don't even have to steer since you'll be gliding down a divided glazed lane cleverly stacked with occasional moguls (small bumps)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
 With Amazon founder Jeff Bezos buying the Washington Post and eBay founder Pierre Omidyar putting up $250 milllion for a project featuring journalist Glenn Greenwald, it is starting to feel as tech billionaires might be just the folks to save journalism. But what kind of owners will they be? That's one of the questions discussed on Howard Kurtz's "Media Buzz" show Sunday on Fox News. Here's video (below) of Kurtz, me and Farhad Manjoo, tech columnist for the Wall Street Journal, talking about the roles tech money and expertise could play in the future of journalism.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
Collaboratively administrate empowered markets via plug-and-play networks. Dynamically procrastinate B2C users after installed base benefits. Dramatically visualize customer directed convergence without revolutionary ROI. Efficiently unleash cross-media information without cross-media value. Quickly maximize timely deliverables for real-time schemas. Dramatically maintain clicks-and-mortar solutions without functional solutions. Completely synergize resource sucking relationships via premier niche markets.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
You have to remember that most journalism is done on the fly.  Language Log has a post today on selective (and distorted) quotation in news stories . Here is some speculation from the post: " The journalist knows what (s)he wants to write, and what sort of facts and quotes are needed in support, and therefore manipulates the person interviewed so as produce suitable copy - in this case mainly by selecting a few suitable fragments from a long interview. " There is something to this.
FEATURES
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
"Pay no attention to what I'm doing here," says Mike Stone, in his best Wizard of Oz voice. "Just look out the window and keep pedaling. " I keep pedaling, breaking into a sweat but going nowhere, as my bike is mounted on what's called a trainer in the bike-fitting studio in the back of Princeton Sports in Columbia. And then I do look away from the window and see that "Stoney," as he's known, has set up some kind of laser on the windowsill and is projecting a red line along my left leg. The line is showing that my knee gravitates to the side as I pedal.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
Brenda Richardson "used to spend any time off running like a madwoman catching up on home projects," says the Towson endodontist. She has since farmed out tasks such as meeting workmen, running errands and waiting for deliveries to Beth Adams and Susan English of the Baltimore firm My Girl Friday. "It's a relief - and actually comforting - to know Beth handles every project professionally and efficiently," says Richardson. Despite the do-it-yourself vogue, many households delegate tasks - running errands, cleaning the house, cooking meals and walking pets - to hired help.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
You have to remember that most journalism is done on the fly.  Language Log has a post today on selective (and distorted) quotation in news stories . Here is some speculation from the post: " The journalist knows what (s)he wants to write, and what sort of facts and quotes are needed in support, and therefore manipulates the person interviewed so as produce suitable copy - in this case mainly by selecting a few suitable fragments from a long interview. " There is something to this.
NEWS
May 14, 1993
Baltimore City's first experimental sale of vacant properties was so successful, it will continue Tuesday. Bidding was so heavy auctioneers simply could not dispose of all the 1,500 abandoned homes. "There was a bid for every single house that was put up," Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke marveled.Good enough. But a word of caution: Just as there is seldom such a thing as a free lunch, watch out for your wallet if anyone offers you a free house.We hope all those successful bidders at the vacant-house auction fully realize what they are getting into.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
Theodore A. "Ted" Dietz, a retired shipyard electrician who earned the sobriquet of "40-Watt Dietz" from fellow volunteer crew members aboard the Liberty ship SS John W. Brown, died Feb. 3 of heart failure at his Severna Park home. He was 91. Born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Dietz was a 1942 graduate of Franklin K. Lane High School. "He enlisted into the Navy before he formally graduated from high school and his mother received his diploma," said his wife of two years, the former Mary Bartlett.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.