Advertisement
HomeCollectionsExpert Witness
IN THE NEWS

Expert Witness

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | December 2, 2009
A 51-year-old Westminster man has been charged with using fake credentials to get hired as a professional engineer by at least three firms in Maryland, the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Tuesday. A Howard County grand jury returned a three-count indictment charging Lawrence D. Novakowski, 51, with one count of practicing without a license and two counts of counterfeiting a public seal, according to the State Board for Professional Engineers, a part of the labor department's division of occupational and professional licensing that investigated.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Morgan Lane Arnold said she was "glad" her father was dead and wished her boyfriend had also killed her father's girlfriend, a forensic psychiatrist testified in court Wednesday. The Howard County teenager was in a state of active psychosis when she made the comments about her father, Dennis Lane, said the psychiatrist, Neil Blumberg, who testified as an expert witness for the girl's defense. Arnold's lawyers are trying to get her case transferred to the juvenile system. The girl, now 16, is accused of asking her then-boyfriend, Jason Bulmer, to kill Lane.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Terry Musika, an accountant and expert witness who worked in business fraud and patent damages claims, died of pancreatic cancer Dec. 18 at his Hunt Valley home. He was 64. The co-founder of Invotex, a Fells Point business, he was a legal economics expert in lawsuits involving corporate giants Apple, BlackBerry and Samsung. He also immersed himself in Baltimore legal affairs and testified in numerous local cases. "He was considered one of the top intellectual property damages experts in the country," said a colleague, Debbie Pavlik, his firm's marketing manager.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
At a recent news conference, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts pledged that his department would responsibly use the controversial tactic known until recently as "stop and frisk. " As an example to the public and his officers, he described making such a stop himself. But experts say Batts' example — he said at the time that he searched somebody based on a tip that the person was a hit man for the Black Guerrilla Family gang — may not meet the standards for such stops.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
One of two spectators killed in a 2009 drag-racing accident on Interstate 70 was standing in a traffic lane, and not on the shoulder, an accident-reconstruction expert said Thursday in the driver's double-homicide trial. But under cross-examination from a prosecutor in Baltimore County Circuit Court, the defense's witness, Sal Fariello, conceded that the man could have been running from the car bearing down on him at about 84 mph. The victim was Jonathan Henderson, 20, who was struck and killed, as was his friend, Mary-Kathryn Abernathy, 21, who had been standing nearby as they watched an early-morning drag race near Security Boulevard in Woodlawn on June 21, 2009.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
A man who has been tried three times in the death of a 3-year-old girl has been denied a chance at a fourth trial with a ruling by the state's highest court affirming his latest conviction for involuntary manslaughter and child abuse. The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled unanimously that 31-year-old Erik Stoddard's conviction and 40-year prison sentence will stand in the 2002 fatal beating of Calen Faith Dirubbo in her Northeast Baltimore home. Police said the suspect was angry because he had been unable to toilet train the girl.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
A police surveillance video that was key evidence in the 2011 mistrial of Travers and Tremayne Johnson, accused of setting a pit bull on fire, will be presented to jurors in the brothers' retrial, a judge ruled Monday. Defense attorneys had sought to have the tape thrown out. An expert witness brought in by prosecutors said the video is of higher quality than many other surveillance tapes used in court, with twice as many frames per second as similar tapes. Distortions in the video that defense lawyers attacked are common and can be the result of many factors, Douglas Lacey, a forensic video analyst, said in court.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
At a recent news conference, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts pledged that his department would responsibly use the controversial tactic known until recently as "stop and frisk. " As an example to the public and his officers, he described making such a stop himself. But experts say Batts' example — he said at the time that he searched somebody based on a tip that the person was a hit man for the Black Guerrilla Family gang — may not meet the standards for such stops.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Morgan Lane Arnold said she was "glad" her father was dead and wished her boyfriend had also killed her father's girlfriend, a forensic psychiatrist testified in court Wednesday. The Howard County teenager was in a state of active psychosis when she made the comments about her father, Dennis Lane, said the psychiatrist, Neil Blumberg, who testified as an expert witness for the girl's defense. Arnold's lawyers are trying to get her case transferred to the juvenile system. The girl, now 16, is accused of asking her then-boyfriend, Jason Bulmer, to kill Lane.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Richard N. Novotny Sr., former executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association who also lobbied on behalf of state recreational fishermen, died Sunday of kidney failure at Ivy Hall Geriatric & Rehabilitation Center in Middle River. The longtime Essex resident was 67. "He was highly regarded, and when Rich was in a leadership role, he helped form a strong relationship between [the Department of Natural Resources] and the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Terry Musika, an accountant and expert witness who worked in business fraud and patent damages claims, died of pancreatic cancer Dec. 18 at his Hunt Valley home. He was 64. The co-founder of Invotex, a Fells Point business, he was a legal economics expert in lawsuits involving corporate giants Apple, BlackBerry and Samsung. He also immersed himself in Baltimore legal affairs and testified in numerous local cases. "He was considered one of the top intellectual property damages experts in the country," said a colleague, Debbie Pavlik, his firm's marketing manager.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Richard N. Novotny Sr., former executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association who also lobbied on behalf of state recreational fishermen, died Sunday of kidney failure at Ivy Hall Geriatric & Rehabilitation Center in Middle River. The longtime Essex resident was 67. "He was highly regarded, and when Rich was in a leadership role, he helped form a strong relationship between [the Department of Natural Resources] and the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
A police surveillance video that was key evidence in the 2011 mistrial of Travers and Tremayne Johnson, accused of setting a pit bull on fire, will be presented to jurors in the brothers' retrial, a judge ruled Monday. Defense attorneys had sought to have the tape thrown out. An expert witness brought in by prosecutors said the video is of higher quality than many other surveillance tapes used in court, with twice as many frames per second as similar tapes. Distortions in the video that defense lawyers attacked are common and can be the result of many factors, Douglas Lacey, a forensic video analyst, said in court.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
A man who has been tried three times in the death of a 3-year-old girl has been denied a chance at a fourth trial with a ruling by the state's highest court affirming his latest conviction for involuntary manslaughter and child abuse. The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled unanimously that 31-year-old Erik Stoddard's conviction and 40-year prison sentence will stand in the 2002 fatal beating of Calen Faith Dirubbo in her Northeast Baltimore home. Police said the suspect was angry because he had been unable to toilet train the girl.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
One of two spectators killed in a 2009 drag-racing accident on Interstate 70 was standing in a traffic lane, and not on the shoulder, an accident-reconstruction expert said Thursday in the driver's double-homicide trial. But under cross-examination from a prosecutor in Baltimore County Circuit Court, the defense's witness, Sal Fariello, conceded that the man could have been running from the car bearing down on him at about 84 mph. The victim was Jonathan Henderson, 20, who was struck and killed, as was his friend, Mary-Kathryn Abernathy, 21, who had been standing nearby as they watched an early-morning drag race near Security Boulevard in Woodlawn on June 21, 2009.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
In one of the cases kicking off its fall term, Maryland's highest court is being asked whether a judge violated an Orthodox Jew's right to religious freedom by holding a medical malpractice trial without him and his lawyer during a major Jewish holiday. Lawyers for Alexander Neustadter of Silver Spring argued before the Maryland Court of Appeals last week that Montgomery County Circuit Court judges got so wrapped up in the "efficiency of the docket" that rather than delay the trial or suspend it for two days of Shavuot, the court trampled Neustadter's constitutional rights.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
In one of the cases kicking off its fall term, Maryland's highest court is being asked whether a judge violated an Orthodox Jew's right to religious freedom by holding a medical malpractice trial without him and his lawyer during a major Jewish holiday. Lawyers for Alexander Neustadter of Silver Spring argued before the Maryland Court of Appeals last week that Montgomery County Circuit Court judges got so wrapped up in the "efficiency of the docket" that rather than delay the trial or suspend it for two days of Shavuot, the court trampled Neustadter's constitutional rights.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1995
Scotland E. Williams, being tried in the shooting deaths of two lawyers, tried to throw off police handwriting experts by holding a pen differently when he gave them a sample of his writing, a prosecution witness said yesterday.Jeffrey Cover, chief of the Anne Arundel County police evidence collection unit, told an Anne Arundel Circuit Court jury that Mr. Williams varied how he held a pen when he gave police a writing sample June 23.Mr. Williams, 31, of the 800 block of Bradford Ave., Arnold, has been charged with two counts of first-degree murder and related charges in the deaths of Jose E. Trias, 49, and Julie Noel Gilbert, 48. The two Washington lawyers were found shot to death in their weekend home in Winchester on the Severn.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
The jury in the manslaughter trial of Baltimore Police Officer Tommy Sanders is likely to begin deliberations Friday, after the defense rested its case with testimony from the author of the city police's use of force guidelines, who testified that Sanders' shooting of an unarmed man in 2008 was justified. Sanders' attorney, Michael J. Belsky, and Assistant State's Attorney Lisa Goldberg will give closing arguments Friday, leaving jurors to decide whether Sanders unnecessarily shot and killed Edward Lamont Hunt, 27, as he ran across the parking lot of the Hamilton Park Shopping Center to evade arrest.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | December 2, 2009
A 51-year-old Westminster man has been charged with using fake credentials to get hired as a professional engineer by at least three firms in Maryland, the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Tuesday. A Howard County grand jury returned a three-count indictment charging Lawrence D. Novakowski, 51, with one count of practicing without a license and two counts of counterfeiting a public seal, according to the State Board for Professional Engineers, a part of the labor department's division of occupational and professional licensing that investigated.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.