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By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
High Zero is the anti-Virgin Mobile FreeFest. Although the experimental music festival is older by seven years (it began in 1999), it coincides this year with one of the area's biggest music festivals. For every Dan Deacon at High Zero, there is a Ludacris at FreeFest. The FreeFest might have M.I.A., but High Zero has bassoonist Karen Borca. But that's just how High Zero organizers, the High Zero Foundation, like it. They feel they are going after different audiences. It's unlikely, for instance, that there'll be noise installations at the corporate gig as there will be at this DIY festival.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Artist Neil Feather, who builds mechanized musical instruments from bowling balls, film projectors and cigar boxes, among other objects, received this year's $25,000 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday evening. Trained as a ceramicist, Feather said he draws inspiration from antique machinery and "strange technology that didn't make it to the mainstream. " "I like listening to all the matter around me vibrating," Feather, 58, said in a phone interview after the award ceremony at the Walters Art Museum . The Waverly resident is a founding member of the Red Room Collective and the High Zero Foundation, groups that have pushed Baltimore to a vanguard of the international experimental music movement.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 19, 2000
The music world is governed by all sorts of rules - structure, tempo and dynamic markings, to name a few. What happens when you throw them all out and leave everything up to the performer's whim? You get something on the order of High Zero, that's what. High Zero, billed as a Festival of Improvised Experimental Music, returns to Baltimore a year after its remarkably successful premiere, which saw dozens turned away from sold-out performances. More than 30 improvisers from this country, Canada, Italy and Holland will descend on the city for four days of spontaneous music-making, starting Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Seven artists, whose works span experimental musical instruments and genealogy-inspired sculpture, are the finalists in the 2014 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. The prize, which provides the winner with a $25,000 fellowship award that will help them further develop and create their work, is named after civic leader Walter Sondheim and his wife, Janet. The artists are: •Lauren Adams, whose paintings, drawings, prints and other works explore power, politics and labor.
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By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2002
If just the mention of the words "improvised experimental music" brings to mind a man tapping a spoon against a couple of tin cans, chances are you've probably never been to the High Zero Festival. The four-day event, running through Sunday at the Theatre Project, breaks all those preconceived notions about the instruments, the music and its supposed simplicity. The festival features roughly 30 musicians from all over the globe, performing on-the-spot collaborations of improvised experimental music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 23, 1999
Experimental music festivalExplore experimental music during the High Zero Festival of Experimental Improvised Music, tomorrow through Sunday at three Baltimore venues. A group of 28 local, national and international sound improvisers and experimenters play solo or in groups from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. tomorrow at the Lodge, 244 S. Highland Ave.; 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St.; and 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 14 Karat Cabaret, 218 W. Saratoga St. Admission is $8 for each concert; $25 for a four-show pass; and $50 for a premium pass, including a limited-edition CD. Call 410-889-5854, or visit the Web site at www.redroom.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 30, 2001
The 2001-2002 season at the Theatre Project will feature everything from experimental music to hip-hop theater to two one-performer shows by children of Holocaust survivors. "The Theatre Project is not your ordinary theater," executive director Robert P. Mrozek said. "It's not merely theater; it's all sorts of contemporary performance art, and our programming is very similar to what you would find at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, or PS 122, or the Kitchen in New York." (He was referring to venues known for wide-ranging avant-garde work.
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By Colleen Freyvogel and Colleen Freyvogel,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
Begin with one part kitchen table. Mix in 3 cups of string and one bowling ball, throw in a dash of engineering expertise and a passion for experimental music. For "sound mechanic" extraordinaire Neil Feather, that's a recipe for success. Feather, an exhibit technician at Port Discovery, has been inventing and building musical instruments for more than 30 years, since he was 16 years old - beginning in the early '70s, when he and some friends formed a car band in western Pennsylvania called Tanadril Oxyphenbutazone NF Giegy (after ingredients in an arthritis medicine)
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By Robert Haskins | October 22, 1990
Music by four composers active during the 1760s and 1770s -- a time of fertile experimentation separating the fully formed masterpieces of the High Baroque and those of the Classical eras -- was the bill of fare for Pro Musica Rara's performance yesterday at the Baltimore Museum of Art.For this opening concert of its 16th season, Pro Musica's forces were augmented by the early music violin performance expert Stanley Ritchie. Mr. Ritchie led the ensemble in symphonies by William Boyce (number III in C major)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Artist Neil Feather, who builds mechanized musical instruments from bowling balls, film projectors and cigar boxes, among other objects, received this year's $25,000 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday evening. Trained as a ceramicist, Feather said he draws inspiration from antique machinery and "strange technology that didn't make it to the mainstream. " "I like listening to all the matter around me vibrating," Feather, 58, said in a phone interview after the award ceremony at the Walters Art Museum . The Waverly resident is a founding member of the Red Room Collective and the High Zero Foundation, groups that have pushed Baltimore to a vanguard of the international experimental music movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 21, 2012
Shelly Blake-Plock remembers well the day Japanese musician Fuyuki Yamakawa's heart stopped beating. It was a High Zero Festival highlight. "He gave a solo performance, in which he set up contact microphones to his body and amplified his heartbeat," said Blake-Plock, a local musician and an organizer of this year's 14th annual celebration of experimental improvised music. "He is very practiced in breathing techniques to modulate his internal systems. It came down to a point where the percussive beat of the heart through the amplifier got slower and slower and slower and slower -- and then stopped.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
High Zero is the anti-Virgin Mobile FreeFest. Although the experimental music festival is older by seven years (it began in 1999), it coincides this year with one of the area's biggest music festivals. For every Dan Deacon at High Zero, there is a Ludacris at FreeFest. The FreeFest might have M.I.A., but High Zero has bassoonist Karen Borca. But that's just how High Zero organizers, the High Zero Foundation, like it. They feel they are going after different audiences. It's unlikely, for instance, that there'll be noise installations at the corporate gig as there will be at this DIY festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
Laptop DJ Girl Talk tears pop songs apart. But what really turns heads is the way he puts them back together. Feed the Animals and putting them together took about two years, Gillis said. He combed through thousands of songs before settling on the album's roughly 300 samples. "I work with more things that don't work than do," he said. "For every five songs I'll sample, maybe one of those I'll actually end up playing during a live show and even a smaller fraction than that will actually go onto an album."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 2, 2006
On his one day off from his 20-date tour in the United States, Canadian indie rocker Brendan Canning chills in his hotel room in Pensacola, Fla., relishing TV shows he hadn't seen since childhood. Now, the Broken Social Scene co-founder is watching The Jeffersons on Nick at Night. "I grew up with this," he says over the phone. "I don't get to see shows like this anymore." These days, Canning doesn't get to do much outside of making music with his sprawling band, which includes 15 members plus two or three other musician friends, depending on availability.
FEATURES
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2002
If just the mention of the words "improvised experimental music" brings to mind a man tapping a spoon against a couple of tin cans, chances are you've probably never been to the High Zero Festival. The four-day event, running through Sunday at the Theatre Project, breaks all those preconceived notions about the instruments, the music and its supposed simplicity. The festival features roughly 30 musicians from all over the globe, performing on-the-spot collaborations of improvised experimental music.
FEATURES
By Colleen Freyvogel and Colleen Freyvogel,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
Begin with one part kitchen table. Mix in 3 cups of string and one bowling ball, throw in a dash of engineering expertise and a passion for experimental music. For "sound mechanic" extraordinaire Neil Feather, that's a recipe for success. Feather, an exhibit technician at Port Discovery, has been inventing and building musical instruments for more than 30 years, since he was 16 years old - beginning in the early '70s, when he and some friends formed a car band in western Pennsylvania called Tanadril Oxyphenbutazone NF Giegy (after ingredients in an arthritis medicine)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
Laptop DJ Girl Talk tears pop songs apart. But what really turns heads is the way he puts them back together. Feed the Animals and putting them together took about two years, Gillis said. He combed through thousands of songs before settling on the album's roughly 300 samples. "I work with more things that don't work than do," he said. "For every five songs I'll sample, maybe one of those I'll actually end up playing during a live show and even a smaller fraction than that will actually go onto an album."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Seven artists, whose works span experimental musical instruments and genealogy-inspired sculpture, are the finalists in the 2014 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. The prize, which provides the winner with a $25,000 fellowship award that will help them further develop and create their work, is named after civic leader Walter Sondheim and his wife, Janet. The artists are: •Lauren Adams, whose paintings, drawings, prints and other works explore power, politics and labor.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 30, 2001
The 2001-2002 season at the Theatre Project will feature everything from experimental music to hip-hop theater to two one-performer shows by children of Holocaust survivors. "The Theatre Project is not your ordinary theater," executive director Robert P. Mrozek said. "It's not merely theater; it's all sorts of contemporary performance art, and our programming is very similar to what you would find at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, or PS 122, or the Kitchen in New York." (He was referring to venues known for wide-ranging avant-garde work.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 19, 2000
The music world is governed by all sorts of rules - structure, tempo and dynamic markings, to name a few. What happens when you throw them all out and leave everything up to the performer's whim? You get something on the order of High Zero, that's what. High Zero, billed as a Festival of Improvised Experimental Music, returns to Baltimore a year after its remarkably successful premiere, which saw dozens turned away from sold-out performances. More than 30 improvisers from this country, Canada, Italy and Holland will descend on the city for four days of spontaneous music-making, starting Thursday.
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