Advertisement
HomeCollectionsExperimental Aircraft
IN THE NEWS

Experimental Aircraft

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Two men were killed yesterday when their experimental aircraft crashed into a field several miles southwest of Westminster, according to Maryland State Police. The victims were identified as Jerry Ralph Norton, 63, of the 12200 block of Old Frederick Road in Marriottsville, Howard County, and James Mathew Cloeren, 57, of the 2900 block of Rocky Drive, Westminster. Norton was the aircraft's pilot, police say. Both were pronounced dead at the scene. When police answered an emergency call about 4:30 p.m., they said, they found the plane wrecked, but not burned, in a small stream.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Howard Libit | August 5, 2008
Malcolm Hugh Nevin, a retired savings and loan executive who loved to restore custom cars and built an experimental plane after retirement, died of colon cancer Thursday at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. He was 78. Born in Bellefontaine, Ohio, and raised in Cleveland, Mr. Nevin graduated from John Adams High School in Cleveland in the late 1940s and soon joined the Air Force, said his daughter, Patty O'Brien of Westcliffe, Colo. Mr. Nevin trained at an aircraft and mechanics school in Texas and was sent overseas to Tokyo.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Two men were killed yesterday when their experimental aircraft crashed into a field several miles southwest of Westminster, according to Maryland State Police. The victims were identified as Jerry Ralph Norton, 63, of the 12200 block of Old Frederick Road in Marriottsville, Howard County, and James Mathew Cloeren, 57, of the 2900 block of Rocky Drive, Westminster. Norton was the aircraft's pilot, police say. Both were pronounced dead at the scene. When police answered an emergency call about 4:30 p.m., they said, they found the plane wrecked, but not burned, in a small stream.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | February 28, 2008
Patrick Dean's first flight in the plane he spent eight years building got under way with a smooth takeoff and ascent. But only minutes after lifting off from Suburban Airport in Laurel, the small plane suddenly jerked to the left. The wing flaps dropped uncontrollably, the aircraft went into a 180-degree turn, and Dean looked down at the Baltimore-Washington Parkway for a place to make an emergency landing. "I'm in trouble," the 42-year- old architect from Howard County recalled thinking.
NEWS
February 6, 2005
Noise from detonations should be expected in area Aberdeen Proving Ground plans to conduct two large detonations that are likely to be heard outside the installation, Army officials said last week. The detonations are scheduled to occur Thursday or Friday. Questions should be directed to 410-278-1147 or 800-688-8705, officials said. Experimental aircraft group reschedules field trip The Experimental Aircraft Association has rescheduled its field trip to the Udvar-Hazy Center of the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum at Dulles International Airport for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 19. The bus will depart from the Harford County Airport at Aldino.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Jennifer McMenamin and Childs Walker and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
Two men who died in a plane crash near Westminster on Tuesday worked together at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, where both specialized in designing intricate navigation, data-recording and time-keeping devices for unmanned satellites. Jerry Ralph Norton, 63, of Marriottsville and James Mathew Cloeren, 67, of Westminster were veteran employees of the lab. Cloeren had worked there 18 years and Norton 40. They wrote a paper together in 1996 called, "Brief History of Ultra-Precise Oscillators for Ground and Space Applications."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Two men were killed yesterday when their experimental aircraft crashed into a field several miles southwest of Westminster, according to Maryland State Police. Police identified the victims as Jerry Ralph Norton, 63, of the 12200 block of Old Frederick Road in Marriottsville, Howard County, and James Mathew Cloeren, 57, of the 2900 block of Rocky Drive, Westminster. Norton was the aircraft's pilot, police say. Both were pronounced dead at the scene. When police answered the emergency call about 4:30 p.m., they said, they found the wrecked plane in a small stream.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | February 28, 2008
Patrick Dean's first flight in the plane he spent eight years building got under way with a smooth takeoff and ascent. But only minutes after lifting off from Suburban Airport in Laurel, the small plane suddenly jerked to the left. The wing flaps dropped uncontrollably, the aircraft went into a 180-degree turn, and Dean looked down at the Baltimore-Washington Parkway for a place to make an emergency landing. "I'm in trouble," the 42-year- old architect from Howard County recalled thinking.
NEWS
By Howard Libit | August 5, 2008
Malcolm Hugh Nevin, a retired savings and loan executive who loved to restore custom cars and built an experimental plane after retirement, died of colon cancer Thursday at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. He was 78. Born in Bellefontaine, Ohio, and raised in Cleveland, Mr. Nevin graduated from John Adams High School in Cleveland in the late 1940s and soon joined the Air Force, said his daughter, Patty O'Brien of Westcliffe, Colo. Mr. Nevin trained at an aircraft and mechanics school in Texas and was sent overseas to Tokyo.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES dTC | August 11, 1992
For one week each year the Wittman Regional Airport here is the busiest airport in the world, with up to 12,000 landings and takeoffs each day. More than 14,000 planes were tied down in the green fields around the place.It was the week of the annual Experimental Aircraft Association Fly-In Convention. More than 800,000 people were here, spectators and pilots alike, some of them staying a week, living in hotels as far away as Milwaukee, 100 miles down the road, or just camping under the wings of their aircraft.
NEWS
February 6, 2005
Noise from detonations should be expected in area Aberdeen Proving Ground plans to conduct two large detonations that are likely to be heard outside the installation, Army officials said last week. The detonations are scheduled to occur Thursday or Friday. Questions should be directed to 410-278-1147 or 800-688-8705, officials said. Experimental aircraft group reschedules field trip The Experimental Aircraft Association has rescheduled its field trip to the Udvar-Hazy Center of the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum at Dulles International Airport for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 19. The bus will depart from the Harford County Airport at Aldino.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Jennifer McMenamin and Childs Walker and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
Two men who died in a plane crash near Westminster on Tuesday worked together at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, where both specialized in designing intricate navigation, data-recording and time-keeping devices for unmanned satellites. Jerry Ralph Norton, 63, of Marriottsville and James Mathew Cloeren, 67, of Westminster were veteran employees of the lab. Cloeren had worked there 18 years and Norton 40. They wrote a paper together in 1996 called, "Brief History of Ultra-Precise Oscillators for Ground and Space Applications."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Two men were killed yesterday when their experimental aircraft crashed into a field several miles southwest of Westminster, according to Maryland State Police. The victims were identified as Jerry Ralph Norton, 63, of the 12200 block of Old Frederick Road in Marriottsville, Howard County, and James Mathew Cloeren, 57, of the 2900 block of Rocky Drive, Westminster. Norton was the aircraft's pilot, police say. Both were pronounced dead at the scene. When police answered an emergency call about 4:30 p.m., they said, they found the plane wrecked, but not burned, in a small stream.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Two men were killed yesterday when their experimental aircraft crashed into a field several miles southwest of Westminster, according to Maryland State Police. Police identified the victims as Jerry Ralph Norton, 63, of the 12200 block of Old Frederick Road in Marriottsville, Howard County, and James Mathew Cloeren, 57, of the 2900 block of Rocky Drive, Westminster. Norton was the aircraft's pilot, police say. Both were pronounced dead at the scene. When police answered the emergency call about 4:30 p.m., they said, they found the wrecked plane in a small stream.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Two men were killed yesterday when their experimental aircraft crashed into a field several miles southwest of Westminster, according to Maryland State Police. The victims were identified as Jerry Ralph Norton, 63, of the 12200 block of Old Frederick Road in Marriottsville, Howard County, and James Mathew Cloeren, 57, of the 2900 block of Rocky Drive, Westminster. Norton was the aircraft's pilot, police say. Both were pronounced dead at the scene. When police answered an emergency call about 4:30 p.m., they said, they found the plane wrecked, but not burned, in a small stream.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES dTC | August 11, 1992
For one week each year the Wittman Regional Airport here is the busiest airport in the world, with up to 12,000 landings and takeoffs each day. More than 14,000 planes were tied down in the green fields around the place.It was the week of the annual Experimental Aircraft Association Fly-In Convention. More than 800,000 people were here, spectators and pilots alike, some of them staying a week, living in hotels as far away as Milwaukee, 100 miles down the road, or just camping under the wings of their aircraft.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A prototype of the V-22 Osprey, a tilt-rotor aircraft whose future was already the subject of furious debate, crashed yesterday in the Potomac River with seven people on board. Pentagon officials said no survivors had been found.The aircraft, which takes off like a helicopter and flies like a plane, was headed for a landing at the Marine Corps air station in Quantico, Va.The aircraft was developed by a partnership of Bell Helicopter Textron and the helicopter division of Boeing Co. Pentagon officials and spokesmen for the two companies said they did not know the cause of the crash, but would investigate.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A prototype of the V-22 Osprey, a tilt-rotor aircraft whose future was already the subject of furious debate, crashed yesterday in the Potomac River with seven people on board. Pentagon officials said no survivors had been found.The aircraft, which takes off like a helicopter and flies like a plane, was headed for a landing at the Marine Corps air station in Quantico, Va.The aircraft was developed by a partnership of Bell Helicopter Textron and the helicopter division of Boeing Co. Pentagon officials and spokesmen for the two companies said they did not know the cause of the crash, but would investigate.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.