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NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | December 14, 2006
A national program placing senior citizens in elementary classrooms as mentors is scheduled to announce an expansion today to four more schools in Baltimore. Currently in 12 city elementary schools and poised to expand to 16, the Experience Corps program assigns seniors to work in kindergarten through third-grade classrooms. Officials report that participating schools have seen significant reductions in the number of children sent to the office for disciplinary problems. And, they say, seniors are often happier and healthier as a result of the work.
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NEWS
By Shirley Sagawa | July 19, 2010
For decades, Maryland has led the way in promoting volunteer and national service. The first (and still only) state in the nation to require service learning for high school graduation, Maryland has laid the groundwork for an engaged population. U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who for decades has quietly ensured that programs like AmeriCorps receive funding, has led the Maryland delegation in making service a national priority. And now Baltimore steps onto the national stage as a recipient of a highly competitive Cities of Service grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Rockefeller Foundation, which will enable Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to appoint a "chief service officer" to become part of her senior team.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | April 14, 2009
Three days each week, Frances Gill immerses herself in a third-grade classroom in West Baltimore, usually plopping down next to a small figure working diligently to do a math problem or write a sentence. For 15 hours a week, she helps out at James Mosher Elementary School, spreading little bits of encouragement here or helping keep a wandering mind focused there. Gill is a member of the Experience Corps, paid volunteers whose work has been found to have significant benefits in inner-city schools.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
When James H. McDonald was 16, back when Baltimore was legally segregated, he set out to apply for a job in a drugstore a few blocks into the white side of town. Almost as soon as he'd set foot over Fulton Avenue, the dividing line, he had company. "This gentleman - he said he was a policeman - asked what I was doing there," said McDonald, now 80. McDonald, who was followed to the store to prove that there was indeed a job opening, offered the story Monday as an example of life before the civil-rights activists made inroads, before the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech and long before a black man was elected president.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2005
When Sylvia Lane-Gibson retired in 1999 after a 32-year career at Bell Atlantic, the Johnston Square resident quickly got active in a new residents' association in her East Baltimore neighborhood. But community organizing was not enough for the 61-year-old woman who was determined to make a difference. So last year, she joined Experience Corps, a national program that places older people as paid volunteers in public schools. Under Baltimore's version, more than 100 senior citizens like Lane-Gibson volunteer in six elementary schools.
NEWS
December 19, 1999
In Baltimore CityRetirees sought to tutor, work in school librariesA new partnership is looking for retirees who can help pupils learn reading skills and who can work in the libraries at three city elementary schools.People who are at least 60 years old are being sought to share their experience with children at Abbottston, Guilford and Dallas F. Nicholas Sr. elementary schools. Participants, who will be trained, are asked to devote 15 hours a week to the school work. They will be paid $150 a month to cover out-of-pocket expenses.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
When James H. McDonald was 16, back when Baltimore was legally segregated, he set out to apply for a job in a drugstore a few blocks into the white side of town. Almost as soon as he'd set foot over Fulton Avenue, the dividing line, he had company. "This gentleman - he said he was a policeman - asked what I was doing there," said McDonald, now 80. McDonald, who was followed to the store to prove that there was indeed a job opening, offered the story Monday as an example of life before the civil-rights activists made inroads, before the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech and long before a black man was elected president.
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
When Geraldine Anderson began mentoring students in a kindergarten class at Waverly Elementary School eight months ago, the 68-year-old retired Social Security worker had her doubts. "You have to work hard with kindergartners," she said. "I couldn't get down on the floor during playtime." But now Anderson - who is proud to be dubbed "granny" by the children - can stand on her own. "It's given me energy, working here," Anderson said. Anderson has become an enthusiastic participant in a burgeoning program that has attracted a growing number of fans among seniors, educators and community leaders in Baltimore.
NEWS
September 27, 2008
When Shirley Cherry was helping out at Guilford Elementary School a couple of years ago, a boy spoke rudely to her, and his teacher made him write an apology. But the note was poorly written, full of grammatical errors and bad punctuation. "I can't accept this," Ms. Cherry told the boy, who was about 10. "But if you'd like me to help show you how to write this letter, I'd be happy to." By the time they were done, the boy, all smiles, had told the 70-year-old retiree that he hoped she would return to his class the next day. Finding more people who, like Ms. Cherry, are willing to invest their time and talents in bettering their neighborhoods is a key goal of the timely, bipartisan Serve America Act. The first major legislation in 15 years designed to bolster volunteerism and national service, it would funnel resources to volunteer centers across the country; expand service learning opportunities for youths; create a series of "corps" focused on health, the environment and other specific areas; and create new opportunities for older Americans to volunteer.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | April 24, 2008
Despite falling revenue and a budget that looks bleaker by the day, Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration announced yesterday it had identified more than $2 million in additional money for youth programs. By far the largest infusion of new money, $1.5 million, would be directed to community schools, which place social services and other programs inside city school buildings. And $250,000 would help pay to assign senior volunteers to schools. The announcement of additional city funding for youth programs came a day after the administration announced it would forgo a 2-cent property tax cut in its $2.94 billion budget - a $5.4 million savings for the city - but officials said the two decisions were not related.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | April 14, 2009
Three days each week, Frances Gill immerses herself in a third-grade classroom in West Baltimore, usually plopping down next to a small figure working diligently to do a math problem or write a sentence. For 15 hours a week, she helps out at James Mosher Elementary School, spreading little bits of encouragement here or helping keep a wandering mind focused there. Gill is a member of the Experience Corps, paid volunteers whose work has been found to have significant benefits in inner-city schools.
NEWS
September 27, 2008
When Shirley Cherry was helping out at Guilford Elementary School a couple of years ago, a boy spoke rudely to her, and his teacher made him write an apology. But the note was poorly written, full of grammatical errors and bad punctuation. "I can't accept this," Ms. Cherry told the boy, who was about 10. "But if you'd like me to help show you how to write this letter, I'd be happy to." By the time they were done, the boy, all smiles, had told the 70-year-old retiree that he hoped she would return to his class the next day. Finding more people who, like Ms. Cherry, are willing to invest their time and talents in bettering their neighborhoods is a key goal of the timely, bipartisan Serve America Act. The first major legislation in 15 years designed to bolster volunteerism and national service, it would funnel resources to volunteer centers across the country; expand service learning opportunities for youths; create a series of "corps" focused on health, the environment and other specific areas; and create new opportunities for older Americans to volunteer.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | July 28, 2008
When he started at Maryland State College in 1962, Daniel M. Maddox envisioned a career working with young people, preferably in physical education. But as often happens, life got in the way and Maddox decided he needed a steady paycheck more than a college degree. So at 20, he took a job at General Motors and worked there almost 40 years. Now that he's retired at 63, Maddox has renewed his interest in helping young people by volunteering during the school year at Tench Tilghman Elementary School as a part of Experience Corps, a Civic Ventures program that places people 55 and older in urban classrooms.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | April 24, 2008
Despite falling revenue and a budget that looks bleaker by the day, Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration announced yesterday it had identified more than $2 million in additional money for youth programs. By far the largest infusion of new money, $1.5 million, would be directed to community schools, which place social services and other programs inside city school buildings. And $250,000 would help pay to assign senior volunteers to schools. The announcement of additional city funding for youth programs came a day after the administration announced it would forgo a 2-cent property tax cut in its $2.94 billion budget - a $5.4 million savings for the city - but officials said the two decisions were not related.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Brent Jones and John Fritze and Brent Jones,Sun reporters | April 4, 2008
Dozens of advocates for community schools and other youth programs pleaded with city officials last night to maintain funding for their initiatives, arguing that proposed budget cuts would have a devastating effect on Baltimore's children. Speaking at a public hearing on the $2.92 billion city budget that was proposed last month by Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration, the advocates said the city must increase its budget for youth programs by $5 million to match the money spent last year.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | December 14, 2006
A national program placing senior citizens in elementary classrooms as mentors is scheduled to announce an expansion today to four more schools in Baltimore. Currently in 12 city elementary schools and poised to expand to 16, the Experience Corps program assigns seniors to work in kindergarten through third-grade classrooms. Officials report that participating schools have seen significant reductions in the number of children sent to the office for disciplinary problems. And, they say, seniors are often happier and healthier as a result of the work.
NEWS
By Shirley Sagawa | July 19, 2010
For decades, Maryland has led the way in promoting volunteer and national service. The first (and still only) state in the nation to require service learning for high school graduation, Maryland has laid the groundwork for an engaged population. U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who for decades has quietly ensured that programs like AmeriCorps receive funding, has led the Maryland delegation in making service a national priority. And now Baltimore steps onto the national stage as a recipient of a highly competitive Cities of Service grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Rockefeller Foundation, which will enable Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to appoint a "chief service officer" to become part of her senior team.
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
When Geraldine Anderson began mentoring students in a kindergarten class at Waverly Elementary School eight months ago, the 68-year-old retired Social Security worker had her doubts. "You have to work hard with kindergartners," she said. "I couldn't get down on the floor during playtime." But now Anderson - who is proud to be dubbed "granny" by the children - can stand on her own. "It's given me energy, working here," Anderson said. Anderson has become an enthusiastic participant in a burgeoning program that has attracted a growing number of fans among seniors, educators and community leaders in Baltimore.
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