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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1999
BANGOR, Maine -- If Paul Revere ever shouted "The British are coming!" in this neck of the woods, it most likely happened during a moment of panic in 1779, when he turned tail and ran. And if the fleeing patriot left anything behind, it may yet be awaiting rescue at the bottom of the murky Penobscot River.That's what archaeologist Warren Riess and a bunch of local historians are hoping. They recently began planning to search in earnest for such artifacts, although the items would be a reminder of one of the worst disasters in U.S. naval history.
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NEWS
May 26, 1992
A man making his way back from a North Pole expedition was found recently, alive after 16 days out, wandering off course and seven days off schedule. Bob Mantell, 37, of Ely, Minn., was spotted by a helicopter pilot 15 miles northwest of his destination, a Canadian island in the Arctic Ocean off northwestern Greenland."He was fine. He didn't perceive himself to be in any trouble," expedition manager Liane Benoit said by telephone from Ottawa, Ontario, after Mr. Mantell was picked up by a Canadian army and police team.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 15, 1993
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- The American Women's Trans-Antarctic Expedition has made history by becoming the first team of women explorers to reach the South Pole on their own power.A science station at the South Pole radioed to expedition officials in St. Paul that the expedition arrived there yesterday.The team members are the first women to reach the bottom of the world without dogsled or motorized vehicles. They also are attempting to become the first expedition of women explorers to cross the continent.
NEWS
By Ana Arana | October 28, 1990
Bogota, Colombia--Scientists working with humpback whalesoff the Pacific coast of Colombia have obtained valuable electrocardiograms that can be used in human heart research.Working near the Pacific island of Gorgona, Colombian scientistaccompanied by U.S. and European cardiologists and marine biologists followed the tempestuous whales, known for their frantic jumps out of the water. The whales come to the Pacific coast every year to mate, with the males engaging in a loud mating ceremony.
NEWS
May 16, 1995
Burglars who entered a Severn home through an unlocked sliding door Friday morning stole $450 worth of property while a resident of the house slept, county police said.Joyce Marie Lechliter, 67, reported the burglary about 7:30 a.m. Saturday. The burglary occurred between 4:20 a.m. -- when her husband left the house to go fishing -- and 7 a.m., when she woke up and found the videocassette recorder missing from the living room, police said.A container of coins and several earrings also were stolen from the couple's bedroom, police said.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 23, 1993
BEIJING -- Among the sand dunes and the ruins of once flourishing oases on China's legendary Silk Road, archaeologists have dug up an ancient city that may have been inhabited by dropouts from Alexander the Great's army.The rediscovery of the mysterious city of Niya came 90 years after British explorer Sir Aurel Stein was led by villagers to its remains in 1903 and, according to the official New China news agency, "pillaged Greek-style furniture and ancient documents written in the long-dead Kharoshthi language."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2008
Robert J.M. Wilson, former president of Adams Express Co. and of Petroleum & Resources Corp., who as a youth participated in the historic Fahnestock Expedition to the South Pacific, died of pneumonia Wednesday at the Charlestown Retirement Community. He was 88. Mr. Wilson was born in Millbrook, N.Y., and was raised in Greenwich, Conn., and Rumson, N.J. He was a 1938 graduate of the Choate School and earned a bachelor's degree in sociology at Yale University in 1942. "Instead of attending his freshman year at Yale, he joined a yearlong expedition to the South Seas on the Fahnestock Expedition," said his daughter, Olivia Wilson Welbourn of Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2001
Dressed in blue, red and orange jackets, the girls stood under a large, ceiling-mounted sprinkler as silver beads of water dripped from their heads and shoulders. Despite the downpour, the 14 students from Oldfields School emerged from the "rain room" at the W. L. Gore & Associates Inc. plant in Elkton with damp faces but dry shirts and fleece vests. "That was awesome," said Jennifer Wolf, 16, of Wilmington, Del., a member of a select team from the private girls school in Glencoe that will attempt next month to climb Nevado Chinchey, a 20,400-foot peak in the Peruvian Andes.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
An international team of climbers completed the highest-ever rescue of victims from the dangerous north side of Mount Everest yesterday. The four stricken climbers --- an American and a Guatemalan from one expedition and two Russians from another team - were moved down to a lower altitude where they are being treated. The rescue mission began overnight Wednesday just below the 29,035-foot summit and played out on the ice and crumbling rocks as guides, Sherpas and clients formed a human chain to ferry supplies and fresh manpower to the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Special to the Sun | March 18, 2001
If your idea of a vacation is an annual jaunt to Rehoboth or a week at Disney World, this probably isn't the trip for you. But several dozen well-heeled people who crave more original ways to spend their downtime will soar into the sky on a chartered jet sometime in the next week to watch Russia's Mir space station come tumbling down from a few hundred miles away. Trip organizers are promoting the event, expected to unfold somewhere over the South Pacific, as "a spectacular pyrotechnic display."
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