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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
A three-vehicle crash in Millersville Tuesday claimed the life of a 56-year-old Severna Park man. James Robert Parker of the 500 block Evergreen Road died at Baltimore Washington Medical Center shortly after the 12:48 p.m. crash at Benfield Boulevard and Veterans Highway. He was driving a Dodge Ram pickup east on Benfield Boulevard, when he struck a Ford Expedition that was stopped at the light, police said. The impact of the crash pushed the Expedition into the rear of a Honda CR-V, which was then forced across the intersection until it came to rest on the right shoulder.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
Somewhere off Turkey's Black Sea coast, in a grave a thousand feet beneath the waves, a ghostly mast stands erect in the gloom. Preserved for 1,500 years by the scarcity of oxygen in the Black Sea's depths, the wooden mast provides a tantalizing hint of the historical treasure that archaeologists have now begun to excavate. It is "a perfect wooden ship; it is perfectly preserved," said Lisa Jaccoma, a vice president at the Mystic Aquarium and Institute for Exploration. "It is sitting upright, in a silt layer, with a mast coming off it with a piece of line on top. It's extraordinary."
NEWS
May 26, 1992
A man making his way back from a North Pole expedition was found recently, alive after 16 days out, wandering off course and seven days off schedule. Bob Mantell, 37, of Ely, Minn., was spotted by a helicopter pilot 15 miles northwest of his destination, a Canadian island in the Arctic Ocean off northwestern Greenland."He was fine. He didn't perceive himself to be in any trouble," expedition manager Liane Benoit said by telephone from Ottawa, Ontario, after Mr. Mantell was picked up by a Canadian army and police team.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 15, 1993
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- The American Women's Trans-Antarctic Expedition has made history by becoming the first team of women explorers to reach the South Pole on their own power.A science station at the South Pole radioed to expedition officials in St. Paul that the expedition arrived there yesterday.The team members are the first women to reach the bottom of the world without dogsled or motorized vehicles. They also are attempting to become the first expedition of women explorers to cross the continent.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 30, 1990
KONABUMA-TERI, Venezuela -- Gripping bows and long, slender arrows -- one for shooting animals and one for shooting birds -- the Yanomami hunters emerged from the Amazon underbrush to inspect a Super Puma helicopter that had clattered out of the skies into their village."
NEWS
May 16, 1995
Burglars who entered a Severn home through an unlocked sliding door Friday morning stole $450 worth of property while a resident of the house slept, county police said.Joyce Marie Lechliter, 67, reported the burglary about 7:30 a.m. Saturday. The burglary occurred between 4:20 a.m. -- when her husband left the house to go fishing -- and 7 a.m., when she woke up and found the videocassette recorder missing from the living room, police said.A container of coins and several earrings also were stolen from the couple's bedroom, police said.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 23, 1993
BEIJING -- Among the sand dunes and the ruins of once flourishing oases on China's legendary Silk Road, archaeologists have dug up an ancient city that may have been inhabited by dropouts from Alexander the Great's army.The rediscovery of the mysterious city of Niya came 90 years after British explorer Sir Aurel Stein was led by villagers to its remains in 1903 and, according to the official New China news agency, "pillaged Greek-style furniture and ancient documents written in the long-dead Kharoshthi language."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2008
Robert J.M. Wilson, former president of Adams Express Co. and of Petroleum & Resources Corp., who as a youth participated in the historic Fahnestock Expedition to the South Pacific, died of pneumonia Wednesday at the Charlestown Retirement Community. He was 88. Mr. Wilson was born in Millbrook, N.Y., and was raised in Greenwich, Conn., and Rumson, N.J. He was a 1938 graduate of the Choate School and earned a bachelor's degree in sociology at Yale University in 1942. "Instead of attending his freshman year at Yale, he joined a yearlong expedition to the South Seas on the Fahnestock Expedition," said his daughter, Olivia Wilson Welbourn of Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
An international team of climbers completed the highest-ever rescue of victims from the dangerous north side of Mount Everest yesterday. The four stricken climbers --- an American and a Guatemalan from one expedition and two Russians from another team - were moved down to a lower altitude where they are being treated. The rescue mission began overnight Wednesday just below the 29,035-foot summit and played out on the ice and crumbling rocks as guides, Sherpas and clients formed a human chain to ferry supplies and fresh manpower to the effort.
NEWS
By San Francisco Examiner | May 12, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- Sixty-five years after he became the first American to drive a dog team in Antarctica, Norman D. Vaughan is poised to become the last person to accomplish the feat.Mr. Vaughan plans to spend Dec. 19 -- his 88th birthday -- atop Mount Norman Vaughan after mushing 500 miles across the Ross Ice Shelf. Admiral Richard E. Byrd named the 10,302-foot peak in his honor."There's nothing we're going to face that I can't do . . . ," Mr. Vaughan said this week. "I can do the normal kinds of things that are expected of me: drive a dog team, ski and mountain climb.
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