Advertisement
HomeCollectionsExpedition
IN THE NEWS

Expedition

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
March 24, 2002
When you're a kid, the North Pole is a mythical place, home to elves and a jolly fat man. When you're a grown-up, it's just cold. But to the adventurous folks at TCS Expeditions, it's also a vacation destination. The Seattle-based travel company offers a pricey "educational expedition" to the North Pole in July aboard a Russian icebreaker (above) that's able to cut through the polar ice cap and actually sail to the pole. The ship is equipped with a swimming pool, gym, two sightseeing helicopters and a lecture theater from which historians, naturalists and geologists will hold forth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A limit should be set on the time it takes to clear or dismiss a teacher accused of misconduct so that employees do not remain out of their schools for months and even years, legislators and education advocates said this week. While two legislators suggested action by the General Assembly, an education advocate said some agreement could be reached between unions and school systems on how to expedite a process that is expensive to taxpayers and detrimental to children whose classrooms are staffed by substitutes.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 1, 2012
Regarding Congress' investigation of the Justice Department's Operation Fast and Furious, how can anyone possibly believe this is simply a "partisan gotcha-as-usual" political ploy ("Faster and more furiously," June 22). This is not about the lies of a spoiled baseball player accused of using steroids. It's about an atrociously ill-conceived government gun-running operation that resulted in the deaths of two federal agents and perhaps hundreds of Mexican citizens. "Fast and Furious" is a prime example of government stupidity in action, and the American people deserve to know the truth about why and how this happened.
NEWS
John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Sen. Ben Cardin has joined a coalition of civil rights groups in pressing the Obama administration to finish a years-old review of its guidance on racial profiling, an effort supporters say should be a priority following this summer's upheaval in Ferguson, Mo. Justice Department officials are set to expand a 2003 ban on racial profiling for federal agencies, but advocates say the effort has taken too long and they want Attorney General Eric Holder...
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1996
Michael Eugene Bussey, the last surviving member of the 1926 Dyott Expedition that confirmed Theodore Roosevelt's 1914 exploration of Brazil's treacherous River of Doubt, died Saturday of complications of cancer at his home in Odessa, Texas. The former Baltimorean was 88.Mr. Bussey dropped out of high school and ran away to the sea to work as a ship's radio operator. He was an 18-year-old waiting for another ship job in New York when he learned that British explorer George Miller Dyott needed a radio operator for his expedition to photograph and report all evidence sustaining Roosevelt's trip.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | September 10, 2006
Hannah Leone, a 14-year-old freshman at Glenelg Country School, was a little apprehensive about transferring to the school this year. But after a three-day trip to the Western Maryland 4-H Education Center in Mountain Lake Park with her new classmates, the Lutherville resident was at ease and ready to begin. High school students at Glenelg Country started their first day of school last week in an unusual way - they went on overnight field trips. School officials and students say that the expeditions are beneficial and help everyone prepare for the new year.
SPORTS
By Chris Warner and Chris Warner,Special to Baltimoresun.com | July 5, 2005
Trekking to K2 base camp is magical. The journey begins at the village of Askole, travels along the raging Braldu River, past the snout of the Biafo Glacier and eventually onto the top of the Baltoro and Savoy Glaciers. Towering above the valley floor are dozens of mountains, growing bigger, and more dramatic each day. Like the Himalayas, the Karakorum Mountains were violently thrust upwards as the Indian and the Tibetan plates collided. Both ranges are continuing to grow taller. But here, the peaks seem sculpted by more demonic gods.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
On an isolated island off the coast of California, Ranjit Korah is learning hands-on about marine biology and ecosystems. Korah, of Bel Air, a ninth-grader at Fallston High School, was selected from thousands of students to participate in the international science expedition to California's Channel Islands through Saturday. The Jason Foundation, a multidisciplinary educational organization, controls the Jason Project. Korah is one of 28 students on the "Jason XIV: From Shore to Sea" expedition, working one-on-one with researchers, teachers and students from around the world, said project coordinator Daniel Beaupre.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Sheila Dresser and Michael Dresser and Sheila Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
GREAT FALLS, Mont. -- Before Capt. Meriwether Lewis saw the Great Falls of the Missouri on June 13, 1805, he heard the roar.What he beheld when he reached the tiny island at the base of the falls astonished him. Here the mighty Missouri River, some 1,500 feet wide and swollen with the snowmelt of the Rockies, fell 78 feet. It was, he wrote in his journal, a "sublimely grand specticle the grandest sight I ever beheld." It was also a crucial moment in the journey, the discovery that dispelled any fear that Lewis and William Clark had taken a wrong turn in their expedition.
NEWS
By Ana Arana | October 28, 1990
Bogota, Colombia--Scientists working with humpback whalesoff the Pacific coast of Colombia have obtained valuable electrocardiograms that can be used in human heart research.Working near the Pacific island of Gorgona, Colombian scientistaccompanied by U.S. and European cardiologists and marine biologists followed the tempestuous whales, known for their frantic jumps out of the water. The whales come to the Pacific coast every year to mate, with the males engaging in a loud mating ceremony.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Having circumnavigated the Americas on his own, Annapolis-based sailor Matt Rutherford has turned his attention to researching plastics' effects on environment Matt Rutherford is more comfortable on water than he is on land. As he sat recently for an interview at the U.S. Sailing Hall of Fame in Annapolis, Rutherford was clearly eager to get the next expedition for his Ocean Research Project underway. Talk about having cabin fever: Rutherford spent much of the winter cooped up in the same 42-foot steel schooner on which he and marine biologist Nicole Trenholm sailed to the Azores last summer to research the effects plastics have on the North Atlantic Gyre, one of the world's five major ocean current systems.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
A flight out of BWI was forced to make a hasty landing in Indianapolis Wednesday due to a security issue, airline officials said. Southwest Airlines Flight 362 was bound for Indianapolis out of Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport Wednesday when it was granted "expedited clearance" to land at its destination, Southwest spokesman Dan Landson said. Landson could not provide further detail on the nature of the security issue, but said the 103 passengers and five crew members experienced an "uneventful landing," and were bussed to the terminal Wednesday afternoon.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | March 14, 2014
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman has proposed a bill that would force downtown Columbia developer Howard Hughes Corp. to relinquish ownership of Merriweather Post Pavilion earlier than anticipated, a move Ulman hopes will expedite the redevelopment of the aging concert venue and other public improvement projects in downtown. Ulman said, though excited by the progress of Howard Hughes and others on commercial projects, such as the addition of a Whole Foods and a 380-unit apartment complex called Metropolitan Downtown Columbia, he is frustrated that civic improvements to downtown, such as Merriweather and a planned pathway connecting east and west Columbia, are lagging.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The Social Security Administration plans to streamline its review of disability claims for veterans starting next month, shaving weeks off the process by which it determines benefits, officials are set to announce Wednesday. The Woodlawn-based agency says it will expedite claims for former service members who already have been deemed fully disabled by the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, alleviating a bureaucratic nightmare for veterans who sometimes waited years to get a decision about their eligibility for benefits.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- There's still no firm idea of when South Korean pitcher Suk-min Yoon will officially be a member of the Orioles, but the club is trying to speed up the process. Yoon was in Sarasota on Friday, took his physical and left. The club has not yet officially announced a deal with him. As of late Friday night, Yoon has not yet officially passed his physical, but initial reviews were positive, according to a club source. According to a report out of South Korea by Hoonki Min for Daum Media, the Orioles are trying to expedite Yoon's visa by applying for it in Canada.
SPORTS
By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
During her second day on the Antarctic Peninsula, Elena Perry and her fellow students silently looked around the cold, dry landscape as the driver of their boat turned off the motor. In one of many such instances, the group was struck by how much Earth's southernmost continent abounded with life. "That was the first time we had gotten so close to the wildlife there, and it was an amazingly calm day," said Perry, 21, a junior ecology and evolutionary biology major at Yale. "There were hardly any waves.
FEATURES
August 18, 1991
THIS DATE IN HISTORY: AUG. 18In 1227, the Mongol conqueror Genghis Khan died.In 1587, Virginia Dare became the first child of English parents to be born on American soil, on what is now Roanoke Island, N.C. (However, Virginia and the other members of her colony had mysteriously vanished by the time a relief expedition showed up four years later.)In 1838, the first marine expedition sponsored by the U.S. government set sail from Hampton Roads, Va. The expedition traveled the Pacific Ocean and South Seas, gathering information to help promote U.S. commerce.
SPORTS
By Assoicated Press | October 22, 1992
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Four women plan to go where no women have gone before -- on a 1,500-mile journey across Antarctica.The American Women's Trans-Antarctica Expedition leaves ,X Sunday on a journey on which they'll ski for four months across the continent, pulling sleds of food and supplies. The wind will be up to 100 mph, with temperatures dipping to 50 below zero."The challenge is whether we can ski across this thing [without dogsleds] and pull it off, make this distance when no women have done this," expedition leader Ann Bancroft said.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
JetBlue Airways is giving a little lift to the federal government shutdown with a plan to "Keep Bills Moving" in Washington. The airline is offering to give fliers with the name "Bill" a faster trip through security at airports in Baltimore, Washington and Virginia. JetBlue passengers who have "Bill" - or any version of it - on their official identification will receive Ever More Speed passes that will usher them to the "quickest possible lane" for security screening. "Whatever our personal politics are, we'd all like to see good legislation moving through Washington ," said Marty St. George , senior vice president marketing and commercial strategy for JetBlue.
SPORTS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
As officials at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs look internally for solutions to a claims backlog that is drawing increasing fire from Capitol Hill, they are also reaching for outside help from some of the nation's best-known veterans groups. Under pressure to speed the review of nearly 600,000 long-outstanding claims for veteran benefits, the VA has announced that it is teaming up with the American Legion and Disabled American Veterans to help ensure that new applications are complete and error-free so they can be processed more quickly.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.