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By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | July 22, 2007
Is Expedia Inc. still a good investment bet? - J.H., via the Internet The world's largest online travel agency, featuring Expedia.com, Hotels.com, Hotwire.com and TripAdvisor, has become a hot topic. In a surprising move, it announced last month that it will spend as much as $3.5 billion to buy back up to 42 percent of its common stock at a premium price. Shares of Expedia (EXPE) are up 41 percent this year after a 12 percent decline last year. Earnings rose 49 percent in its first quarter on higher revenues from advertising and European hotel bookings.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | March 29, 2009
Free nights and no-fee flights on Expedia What's the deal?: Get your last night free when you book a three-, four- or five-night hotel stay from Expedia. Travelers can choose from more than 700 hotels participating in the offer. Expedia also is waiving its normal booking fees for domestic and international flights booked by May 31. What's the savings?: Booking fees are about $7 per ticket. Cost of the hotel night varies. For instance, a free fourth night at the New Otani Kaimana Beach Hotel in Oahu, Hawaii will save about $136 on a trip in early May, but a free fourth night at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach will save $289.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | March 29, 2009
Free nights and no-fee flights on Expedia What's the deal?: Get your last night free when you book a three-, four- or five-night hotel stay from Expedia. Travelers can choose from more than 700 hotels participating in the offer. Expedia also is waiving its normal booking fees for domestic and international flights booked by May 31. What's the savings?: Booking fees are about $7 per ticket. Cost of the hotel night varies. For instance, a free fourth night at the New Otani Kaimana Beach Hotel in Oahu, Hawaii will save about $136 on a trip in early May, but a free fourth night at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach will save $289.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Annie Linskey and Brent Jones and Annie Linskey,brent.jones@baltsun.com and annie.linskey@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
Baltimore filed a federal lawsuit yesterday to recover $6 million in taxes that officials say are owed by online booking companies such as Travelocity, Orbitz, Expedia, Hotels.com and others. The lawsuit alleges that those companies provided hotel rooms to the public but failed to pay the room taxes. It also alleges that some companies did not inform their customers about the amount of their "service fees." But an official of the trade association that represents online booking companies said those businesses do not have to pay the room tax, which he said is paid by the hotels.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 9, 2006
SEATTLE -- After months of intense speculation in the real estate industry, the newest company in the field, supersecretive Zillow.com, said yesterday that it is introducing a Web feature that eventually will allow anyone nearly anywhere in the nation to accurately calculate the worth of his home or almost any home they choose. Zillow is the brainchild of Rich Barton, the former Microsoft executive who created Expedia in 1994. Expedia revolutionized the travel industry by transforming it from a service-oriented business into a self-service business.
TRAVEL
By Carol Pucci | July 13, 2003
Everyone knows that shopping for airfares has become complicated. Price is just one consideration. Cancellation policies, charges for rebooking and refund policies come into play. Finding a hotel room has become the same. I was reminded of this when I browsed the Web recently for a room in San Francisco. I found a hotel I liked, checked the prices on a few Internet sites that offer discounts, and called the hotel directly to ask for its best corporate rate. The hotel's lowest price was $25 a night more than on Expedia.
TRAVEL
By CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT and CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT,NEW YORK TIMES | January 1, 2006
If Mary Ann Slater's 13-year-old stepdaughter, Alyssa, had missed her flight from El Paso, Texas, to New York last summer, she might have been forced to buy an expensive one-way ticket home and wait hours for the next plane. But that was before online travel agencies morphed into self-described "consumer champions." When Slater recently called Travelocity, the agency she booked her stepdaughter's tickets through, to tell them Alyssa hadn't made it to the airport on time, a call-center agent came to the rescue.
BUSINESS
By Jerry W. Jackson and Jerry W. Jackson,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 4, 2004
Adding momentum to the trend in online booking, Marriott International Inc. said yesterday that it has signed an agreement with Expedia and Hotels.com to allow those Web-based travel sellers to market Marriott rooms nationwide. The Washington, D.C.-based hotel company has been an industry leader in selling rooms through its Web site, but lately has added third-party sellers. It signed a similar agreement late last year with Travelocity. Marriott said the latest agreement with two more major online sellers is a "win-win" for the company, individual hotels and the traveling public.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Annie Linskey and Brent Jones and Annie Linskey,brent.jones@baltsun.com and annie.linskey@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
Baltimore filed a federal lawsuit yesterday to recover $6 million in taxes that officials say are owed by online booking companies such as Travelocity, Orbitz, Expedia, Hotels.com and others. The lawsuit alleges that those companies provided hotel rooms to the public but failed to pay the room taxes. It also alleges that some companies did not inform their customers about the amount of their "service fees." But an official of the trade association that represents online booking companies said those businesses do not have to pay the room tax, which he said is paid by the hotels.
TRAVEL
By Bob Tedeschi and Bob Tedeschi,New York Times News Service | April 17, 2005
The Internet is perhaps the only place where first-class fliers are treated like second-class citizens. A report issued last month by Consumer WebWatch, a division of Consumers Union, said that people who spent the most money on airline fares must at times overcome serious technology failures in their quest to book premium tickets. According to Forrester Research, an Internet consulting firm, nearly 19 percent of Americans who booked tickets online last year bought domestic business or first-class tickets.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | July 22, 2007
Is Expedia Inc. still a good investment bet? - J.H., via the Internet The world's largest online travel agency, featuring Expedia.com, Hotels.com, Hotwire.com and TripAdvisor, has become a hot topic. In a surprising move, it announced last month that it will spend as much as $3.5 billion to buy back up to 42 percent of its common stock at a premium price. Shares of Expedia (EXPE) are up 41 percent this year after a 12 percent decline last year. Earnings rose 49 percent in its first quarter on higher revenues from advertising and European hotel bookings.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 9, 2006
SEATTLE -- After months of intense speculation in the real estate industry, the newest company in the field, supersecretive Zillow.com, said yesterday that it is introducing a Web feature that eventually will allow anyone nearly anywhere in the nation to accurately calculate the worth of his home or almost any home they choose. Zillow is the brainchild of Rich Barton, the former Microsoft executive who created Expedia in 1994. Expedia revolutionized the travel industry by transforming it from a service-oriented business into a self-service business.
TRAVEL
By CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT and CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT,NEW YORK TIMES | January 1, 2006
If Mary Ann Slater's 13-year-old stepdaughter, Alyssa, had missed her flight from El Paso, Texas, to New York last summer, she might have been forced to buy an expensive one-way ticket home and wait hours for the next plane. But that was before online travel agencies morphed into self-described "consumer champions." When Slater recently called Travelocity, the agency she booked her stepdaughter's tickets through, to tell them Alyssa hadn't made it to the airport on time, a call-center agent came to the rescue.
BUSINESS
By Jerry W. Jackson and Jerry W. Jackson,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 4, 2004
Adding momentum to the trend in online booking, Marriott International Inc. said yesterday that it has signed an agreement with Expedia and Hotels.com to allow those Web-based travel sellers to market Marriott rooms nationwide. The Washington, D.C.-based hotel company has been an industry leader in selling rooms through its Web site, but lately has added third-party sellers. It signed a similar agreement late last year with Travelocity. Marriott said the latest agreement with two more major online sellers is a "win-win" for the company, individual hotels and the traveling public.
TRAVEL
By Carol Pucci | July 13, 2003
Everyone knows that shopping for airfares has become complicated. Price is just one consideration. Cancellation policies, charges for rebooking and refund policies come into play. Finding a hotel room has become the same. I was reminded of this when I browsed the Web recently for a room in San Francisco. I found a hotel I liked, checked the prices on a few Internet sites that offer discounts, and called the hotel directly to ask for its best corporate rate. The hotel's lowest price was $25 a night more than on Expedia.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | July 15, 2011
Members Hotel Network in Columbia has launched a hotel booking website, MHNSaves.com. The company says travelers can book rooms at more than 35,000 hotels in the country and save 5 percent to 30 percent off the lowest available rate. I asked the company's representative how it differs from Hotels.com or Expedia. Lindsay Hebert, responding in an email, says that MHN “allows its members to earn cash back on every reservation booked through the site, and it also allows members to combine their MHN discounts with other discount programs, such as AAA or AARP membership.” Consumers who sign up before the end of this month get a free lifetime membership.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Shawn Langlois and Shawn Langlois,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - The world's second-largest online travel agent just got a facelift. Travelocity (www.travelocity. com) shed its traditional light-colored look last month and replaced it with a darker hue and a new logo in an attempt to distinguish itself from competitors like leader Expedia and Orbitz. The fresh logo shows the company's name against a dark blue sky with hand-drawn stars, which represent "the traveler's natural compass," the company said. "Our goal in the redesign was to evolve the site based on the direct feedback of our customers," said Troy Whitsett, director of customer experience and interactive design for Travelocity, in a statement.
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