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NEWS
By Wayne Pacelle | August 11, 2003
WASHINGTON -- At the root of the government's recent scramble to contain the outbreak of monkeypox lies a simple fact: anyone arriving in the United States carrying meat, fruit or a potted plant from any foreign destination is subject to a thorough inspection and confiscation of the item to ensure it isn't harboring diseases or parasites. But an importer of live exotic animals, say Gambian giant pouched rats that are blamed for introducing the monkey pox virus into the United States from Africa and passing it to humans via pet prairie dogs, faces no such check.
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August 16, 2011
I am not in the area, however my brother lives and works near Frisky's and through him, I have heard of their plight. My hope is that the board will see fit to allow them to continue their kind work. It is not the animals' fault that they end up in a sanctuary, but the laws that allow people to own exoctic pets in the first place! People make the problem and here you have people trying to clean up after that! I have worked in dog rescue for eight years and it's no small task, I assure you. We should not forget that we humans are not the only people on the planet and if we force the other animals into our homes, we need to be ready to step up and care for them till the end!
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
Howard County's animal control, not the Board of Appeals, should decide when a private wildlife shelter in Woodstock must remove its exotic pets the board has ruled. The five appointed board members voted unanimously Tuesday to remove language from an order that gave Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary four years to find new homes for its 28 monkeys. Since 1993, shelter manager Colleen Layton has cared for discarded pets and injured wildlife at Frisky's on Old Frederick Road. A year ago, the board ruled that the shelter could continue to rehabilitate the wildlife but that exotic animals, ostensibly the monkeys, had to go. Workers from the Department of Planning and Zoning first inspected Frisky's in 2000, acting on an anonymous tip that the shelter was operating without proper approval from the county.
NEWS
August 9, 2007
If you live in Baltimore and your preference in pets runs to mongooses, bears and kangaroos, then you'll be sorely disappointed with the city Health Department's new regulations as to which exotic pets you can keep in your home or backyard. But for those who like the distinction between being in a city and being on a farm or in the wild, the regulations are fair, balanced and welcome. The roster of animals that are nurtured as pets has long expanded from dogs, cats, goldfish, parakeets and hamsters to include llamas, monkeys, snakes and all manner of furry, feathered, winged and slithery friends.
NEWS
By Ronald Smothers and Ronald Smothers,New York Times News Service | March 14, 1999
LITTLE FERRY, N.J. -- Since word got out a month ago that Joan Byron-Marasek was keeping 17 tigers in the middle of Jackson Township, other residents around the state might not be blamed for wondering whether there were rhinoceroses down the road or perhaps giraffes in the next town. Not likely, said Paulette Nelson, a senior biologist with the state Division of Fish, Game and Wildlife. Byron-Marasek's Tigers Only Preserve is a rarity in New Jersey, a state that animal specialists and conservationists say is one of the strictest when it comes to allowing people to keep unusual animals.
NEWS
By Julie Turkewitz and Julie Turkewitz,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
Attention, city residents: You may no longer keep your mongoose at home. The Baltimore City Health Department finalized regulations yesterday regarding which exotic pets and farm animals are permitted in homes. No bears, bats, ostriches, kangaroos, monkeys or mongooses as city pets. And Baltimore's avid pigeon racers will be able to keep up to 125 pigeons each - a concession from city health officials after many fanciers squawked at an early proposal to limit ownership to 50. "In the city, we are trying to keep people from having exotic animals that they are really not trained or educated to maintain," said Olivia Farrow, Baltimore's assistant commissioner for environmental health.
NEWS
August 9, 2007
If you live in Baltimore and your preference in pets runs to mongooses, bears and kangaroos, then you'll be sorely disappointed with the city Health Department's new regulations as to which exotic pets you can keep in your home or backyard. But for those who like the distinction between being in a city and being on a farm or in the wild, the regulations are fair, balanced and welcome. The roster of animals that are nurtured as pets has long expanded from dogs, cats, goldfish, parakeets and hamsters to include llamas, monkeys, snakes and all manner of furry, feathered, winged and slithery friends.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | June 24, 1991
LONG BEACH, Calif. -- Long Beach firefighters rescued a 9-year-old boy after his 12-foot pet python wrapped itself around the boy's leg and tried to eat his foot for dessert.The snake had the boy's foot in his mouth "in an attempt to swallow it," said Fire Department spokesman Bob Caldon. "It was looking for its next meal."Alex Henry had just finished feeding a rabbit to his pet Burmese python when it began to coil itself around the youngster's leg, Caldon said.The boy kept the snake in his bedroom and often slept with it at night, Caldon said.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2002
When Chism, a 35-year-old African gray parrot, got excited while perched in a cage at Sea Breeze Pet Center in Timonium, it would mimic a sound rarely heard from a bird. It would meow. But now Chism is missing. Someone stole the meowing parrot and tens of thousands of dollars' worth of other exotic pets from the store in the 1700 block of York Road on May 4. A week earlier, thieves took snakes and turtles and other reptiles from Afishionado in the 6100 block of Kenwood Ave. in Rosedale.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | August 19, 1992
Joan Bosmans has to be one of the few mothers in America who doesn't mind a pair of dragon-like lizards slinking around her living room.And what amounts to a den of snakes in the basement doesn't give her a shiver at bedtime either."
NEWS
By Julie Turkewitz and Julie Turkewitz,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
Attention, city residents: You may no longer keep your mongoose at home. The Baltimore City Health Department finalized regulations yesterday regarding which exotic pets and farm animals are permitted in homes. No bears, bats, ostriches, kangaroos, monkeys or mongooses as city pets. And Baltimore's avid pigeon racers will be able to keep up to 125 pigeons each - a concession from city health officials after many fanciers squawked at an early proposal to limit ownership to 50. "In the city, we are trying to keep people from having exotic animals that they are really not trained or educated to maintain," said Olivia Farrow, Baltimore's assistant commissioner for environmental health.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | February 6, 2007
Chickens are in. Roosters, ducks and other such fair-feathered fowl - out. One beehive is OK, as are 50 pigeons and Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs, albeit no more than 22 inches and 150 pounds. But say goodbye to caiman and snakes and lizards over 5 feet long. And that favorite of urban city pets, green iguanas? Fine, so long as they are between 30 inches and 5 feet long. And don't even think about getting a bear. Such are the proposed regulations handed down from the city's Health Department on exotic and farm animals, a long-nebulous area in the city code.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
Howard County's animal control, not the Board of Appeals, should decide when a private wildlife shelter in Woodstock must remove its exotic pets the board has ruled. The five appointed board members voted unanimously Tuesday to remove language from an order that gave Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary four years to find new homes for its 28 monkeys. Since 1993, shelter manager Colleen Layton has cared for discarded pets and injured wildlife at Frisky's on Old Frederick Road. A year ago, the board ruled that the shelter could continue to rehabilitate the wildlife but that exotic animals, ostensibly the monkeys, had to go. Workers from the Department of Planning and Zoning first inspected Frisky's in 2000, acting on an anonymous tip that the shelter was operating without proper approval from the county.
NEWS
By Wayne Pacelle | August 11, 2003
WASHINGTON -- At the root of the government's recent scramble to contain the outbreak of monkeypox lies a simple fact: anyone arriving in the United States carrying meat, fruit or a potted plant from any foreign destination is subject to a thorough inspection and confiscation of the item to ensure it isn't harboring diseases or parasites. But an importer of live exotic animals, say Gambian giant pouched rats that are blamed for introducing the monkey pox virus into the United States from Africa and passing it to humans via pet prairie dogs, faces no such check.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Michael Stroh and Frank D. Roylance and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Every year millions of wild or exotic animals arrive in the United States to spend the rest of their lives living with families as pets. Stowing away inside many of these creatures is an array of microscopic parasites, bacteria and viruses. Under the right circumstances, they can trigger disease among livestock and humans - such as this spring's monkeypox outbreak in the Midwest. Standing guard against this threat at the nation's ports of entry are overworked inspectors such as Cathy Cockey of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2002
When Chism, a 35-year-old African gray parrot, got excited while perched in a cage at Sea Breeze Pet Center in Timonium, it would mimic a sound rarely heard from a bird. It would meow. But now Chism is missing. Someone stole the meowing parrot and tens of thousands of dollars' worth of other exotic pets from the store in the 1700 block of York Road on May 4. A week earlier, thieves took snakes and turtles and other reptiles from Afishionado in the 6100 block of Kenwood Ave. in Rosedale.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Michael Stroh and Frank D. Roylance and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Every year millions of wild or exotic animals arrive in the United States to spend the rest of their lives living with families as pets. Stowing away inside many of these creatures is an array of microscopic parasites, bacteria and viruses. Under the right circumstances, they can trigger disease among livestock and humans - such as this spring's monkeypox outbreak in the Midwest. Standing guard against this threat at the nation's ports of entry are overworked inspectors such as Cathy Cockey of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
NEWS
By Ronald Smothers and Ronald Smothers,New York Times News Service | March 14, 1999
LITTLE FERRY, N.J. -- Since word got out a month ago that Joan Byron-Marasek was keeping 17 tigers in the middle of Jackson Township, other residents around the state might not be blamed for wondering whether there were rhinoceroses down the road or perhaps giraffes in the next town. Not likely, said Paulette Nelson, a senior biologist with the state Division of Fish, Game and Wildlife. Byron-Marasek's Tigers Only Preserve is a rarity in New Jersey, a state that animal specialists and conservationists say is one of the strictest when it comes to allowing people to keep unusual animals.
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