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Exorcism

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HEALTH
By Dan Morse, The Washington Post | January 25, 2014
A Montgomery County judge on Friday ordered a mental health evaluation for a woman accused of killing two toddlers in what police said was an attempt at an exorcism. Monifa Sanford, 21, is being held without bond in the Montgomery County jail, charged with two counts of first-degree murder. Her housemate, Zakieya Avery, the mother of the two children, also is being held without bond and is charged with two counts of first-degree murder. Both women also are charged with two counts of attempted first-degree murder because they are accused of attacking Avery's two older children.
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NEWS
By Dan Morse and The Washington Post | March 14, 2014
A Montgomery County woman accused of stabbing her children in a bloody exorcism was formally indicted on first-degree murder charges Thursday. Her attorney said he plans to pursue an insanity defense. Brian Shefferman, who represents Zakieya Avery, said his client probably was not criminally responsible for her conduct Jan. 17 inside a townhouse in Germantown. “I think the evidence will show she was clearly seriously mentally ill at the time,” he said. Avery was indicted on two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of her 18-month-old son, Norell Harris, and 2-year-old daughter, Zyana Harris.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
The rite, those few priests who have performed it say, can unfold as a quiet prayer session or a show of violence. The afflicted person may curse the cleric, speak in a voice not his or her own, even assume facial features that one priest described as "reptilian. " But in the great majority of cases in which a Catholic seeks an exorcism, church officials say, what the person really needs is help of a less dramatic nature: a doctor, a therapist or simple pastoral counseling. With some parishes seeing an increase in claims of demonic possession in the United States, the Roman Catholic Church is training its clergy in how to respond to requests for the ancient rite.
HEALTH
By Dan Morse, The Washington Post | January 25, 2014
A Montgomery County judge on Friday ordered a mental health evaluation for a woman accused of killing two toddlers in what police said was an attempt at an exorcism. Monifa Sanford, 21, is being held without bond in the Montgomery County jail, charged with two counts of first-degree murder. Her housemate, Zakieya Avery, the mother of the two children, also is being held without bond and is charged with two counts of first-degree murder. Both women also are charged with two counts of attempted first-degree murder because they are accused of attacking Avery's two older children.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Police released 911 dispatch tapes Monday that reveal how residents in a Germantown neighborhood tried to draw attention to a bizarre scene where police say two toddlers were killed by their mother and another woman in an exorcism last week. "The mother came out, she reported that she had something going on and she didn't want her baby to be in danger in the house," a man who had called 911 at 10:14 p.m. on Thursday told a dispatcher. The man could be heard talking to two women he said were attacking him as he reported the incident.
NEWS
By New York Times | April 4, 1991
Network television, with the consent of a priest in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, plans to show the film of an exorcism performed on a teen-ager.Exorcism, the effort to cleanse satanic influence from the human body and soul, has been a solemn ritual of the Catholic Church since medieval times, and it remains part of Catholic theology.Historically shrouded in privacy, it has been performed less and less often in recent decades as the church has embraced psychiatric explanations of abnormal behavior and become wary the aura of Hollywood horror that surrounds the practice.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 9, 2005
The Exorcism of Emily Rose might as well take place in giant paperweights. Every now and then director Scott Derrickson shakes up some snowflakes for eerie or funereal effect. But the action unfolds in a vacuum. The selling point of this piece of "serious" horror is that it's rooted in fact. Unfortunately, nothing in it rings with the faintest tinkle of truth. Derrickson and Paul Harris Boardman base their script on the story of a Catholic priest (Tom Wilkinson) tried for negligent homicide.
NEWS
By Teresa Watanabe and Teresa Watanabe,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2000
RALEIGH, N.C. -- In this Southern town, demons are loose among the tall pines and steepled churches. Bob Larson, an evangelical minister who has honed the art of exorcism into astonishing public performance, was facing down the demon of witchcraft in Karen Ward, a 42-year-old medical administrator. Or so the guttural voice that emanated from the woman identified itself. Before a standing-room-only crowd in a Hilton hotel here, the voice growled that it had gained a foothold in Ward by cursing her bloodline 10 generations ago, had pushed her into evil sex and intended to keep her in its grasp.
FEATURES
By James D. Davis and James D. Davis,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | April 5, 1991
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The girl retches, writhes, yowls and bares her teeth. "Get outta here, me not wanna leave," she shrieks at the priest, as one hand snaps the gauze bonds tying her to the chair.No, it's not a rerun of "The Exorcist." It's a segment on "20/20" to be aired tonight that shows an actual Roman Catholic ritual of casting out demons. And, except for the lack of levitation and white-face, the exorcism closely resembles the 1973 movie starring Linda Blair.Videotaped at a nun's home in suburban Palm Beach County last October, the segment shows perhaps the only church-authorized recording of the Rite of Exorcism.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 18, 2005
ROME - The Roman Catholic Church is facing a shortage that you might not have heard about: qualified exorcists. Yesterday, about 100 priests rose in prayer, asked St. Mary for protection, then sat down to an eight-week study of exorcism and how to distinguish and fight true demonic possession. The course at Rome's Regina Apostolorum, a prestigious pontifical university, represents the first time a Vatican-sanctioned study at this level has been dedicated to exorcism. In Italy, the number of official exorcists has soared over the past 20 years to between 300 and 400, church officials say. But they aren't enough to handle the avalanche of requests for help from hundreds of tormented people who believe they are possessed.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Police released 911 dispatch tapes Monday that reveal how residents in a Germantown neighborhood tried to draw attention to a bizarre scene where police say two toddlers were killed by their mother and another woman in an exorcism last week. "The mother came out, she reported that she had something going on and she didn't want her baby to be in danger in the house," a man who had called 911 at 10:14 p.m. on Thursday told a dispatcher. The man could be heard talking to two women he said were attacking him as he reported the incident.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Neighbors lit candles and laid stuffed animals Sunday at a makeshift shrine erected at the Germantown home of two toddlers who police say were killed by their mother and another woman as they tried to exorcise spirits from the children's bodies. "Why would someone do this?" said neighbor Zoe Gill, 62, who walked with her 10-year-old granddaughter Kylie Sunday to take a Mickey Mouse and white votive candles to the Cherry Bend Drive shrine. "I can't think of anything to say to Kylie to help her understand," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks | October 25, 2012
What was the best way to cure someone of ungodliness and demonic activities in the 1960s? If you guessed "burn them," you're wrong. That was more 1450s-1700s. If you guessed a good-old fashioned exorcism, you're right! (I don't have any prizes, so you'll have to settle for this wonderful recap.) The victim in this episode is a teenage boy named Jed, who tore open the body of one of his family's barn animals and ate its heart (He probably just wanted to be Edward Cullen for Halloween)
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
The rite, those few priests who have performed it say, can unfold as a quiet prayer session or a show of violence. The afflicted person may curse the cleric, speak in a voice not his or her own, even assume facial features that one priest described as "reptilian. " But in the great majority of cases in which a Catholic seeks an exorcism, church officials say, what the person really needs is help of a less dramatic nature: a doctor, a therapist or simple pastoral counseling. With some parishes seeing an increase in claims of demonic possession in the United States, the Roman Catholic Church is training its clergy in how to respond to requests for the ancient rite.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Do you believe in ghosts? To live in Baltimore is to live in city haunted by its past. I think it's part of our lingering Southerness — the excessively sweet desserts, the annual freakouts over snow, the Faulknerian thing about the past not even being past. Lord knows how many wallets in town still have Hutzler's cards buried behind the ones for Macy's or the ATM, or how many anniversary-celebrants still try to make reservations at Haussner's. Because nothing, of course, is quite so beloved as something that's no longer around.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | December 2, 2005
The Orioles must feel a heck of a lot better that Paul Konerko said he "definitely" considered them before taking $5 million less to re-sign with the White Sox. Hey, nothing personal. This quote must give O's fans chills: He acknowledged that at the beginning of the process, the team "wouldn't have stood a chance." Gee, glad to see the organization's reputation has improved so much. "I think he looked pretty hard at us," executive vice president Mike Flanagan said, "but I just think we had some things going against us."
FEATURES
September 23, 2005
Will this weekend remain heavenly for Reese Witherspoon? Or will Flightplan, a thriller starring Jodie Foster, or Tim Burton's boy-meets-ghoul Corpse Bride be the weekend's draw? Witherspoon's romantic comedy Just Like Heaven, co-starring Mark Ruffalo, had a divine opening weekend, taking in $16.4 million to top The Exorcism of Emily Rose, in second place with $14.9 million. Shown are the past weekend's top-grossing films at North American theaters. Rk (lw)Title (Studio)......Weekend..
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | December 2, 2005
The Orioles must feel a heck of a lot better that Paul Konerko said he "definitely" considered them before taking $5 million less to re-sign with the White Sox. Hey, nothing personal. This quote must give O's fans chills: He acknowledged that at the beginning of the process, the team "wouldn't have stood a chance." Gee, glad to see the organization's reputation has improved so much. "I think he looked pretty hard at us," executive vice president Mike Flanagan said, "but I just think we had some things going against us."
FEATURES
September 23, 2005
Will this weekend remain heavenly for Reese Witherspoon? Or will Flightplan, a thriller starring Jodie Foster, or Tim Burton's boy-meets-ghoul Corpse Bride be the weekend's draw? Witherspoon's romantic comedy Just Like Heaven, co-starring Mark Ruffalo, had a divine opening weekend, taking in $16.4 million to top The Exorcism of Emily Rose, in second place with $14.9 million. Shown are the past weekend's top-grossing films at North American theaters. Rk (lw)Title (Studio)......Weekend..
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