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NEWS
January 19, 2014
You fools have your heads in the sand ("Settling the estate tax," Jan. 17). Would the state (and your editorial board) prefer a small percentage of a big pot (after enacting a reduction in the estate tax) or a big percentage of not very much (which is what you have today)? The rich have the most mobility and the best advisers, and they will take action to avoid this onerous tax. While a lot of rich folk might live in Maryland today, that doesn't mean they will retire or establish tax residences elsewhere in the future.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 19, 2014
You fools have your heads in the sand ("Settling the estate tax," Jan. 17). Would the state (and your editorial board) prefer a small percentage of a big pot (after enacting a reduction in the estate tax) or a big percentage of not very much (which is what you have today)? The rich have the most mobility and the best advisers, and they will take action to avoid this onerous tax. While a lot of rich folk might live in Maryland today, that doesn't mean they will retire or establish tax residences elsewhere in the future.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 15, 2013
As a child in the mid-1950s, I asked my mother why we didn't live in a modern house built of new, salmon-toned brick like my schoolmates. We lived in a traditional city neighborhood, in a three-story 1915 rowhouse. We had only a small backyard that lacked a barbecue area or swing set. A new exhibition staged by the Jewish Museum of Maryland and presented at downtown's Enoch Pratt Free Library examines this same point, and many others. "Jews on the Move: Baltimore and the Suburban Exodus, 1945-1968" demonstrates how thousands of families called up Davidson movers and took off for ranchers and split levels in greater Northwest Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
As you come to grips to life without Pro Bowl fullback Vonta Leach , consider the following statement: Before this offseason, no NFL team had lost more than five Super Bowl starters from its roster before the following season. As the Ravens start their mandatory minicamp this afternoon, they will be without nine players that started on Feb. 3 when the Ravens beat the San Francisco 49ers, 34-31, to win Super Bowl XLVII. That list includes Leach (released Tuesday), wide receiver Anquan Boldin (traded to San Francisco)
BUSINESS
By JON VAN | September 28, 2005
The coming exodus of baby boomers into retirement may draw down the nation's Social Security coffers and overload its golf courses, but to International Business Machines Corp. it looks like a gold mine. IBM plans to announce today an initiative to help enterprises cope with brain drain as large waves of employees near retirement. "Aging population will be one of the major social and business issues of the 21st Century," said Mary Sue Rogers, an executive with IBM's human capital management group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 6, 2003
Beginning Sunday, as its contribution to the city's Vivat! St. Petersburg festival, Everyman Theatre is presenting staged readings of Martin Sherman's one-woman show Rose, starring Vivienne Shub. The play is an account of a Russian-Jewish immigrant's journey from a Russian village to the Warsaw ghetto, the ship Exodus and, eventually, the United States. Shub, a member of the theater's resident company, was originally planning to perform Rose at Everyman last season but was sidelined by a slipped disk.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | July 8, 2009
Henry "Sonny" Schloss, president of a Southwest Baltimore manufacturing plant who was prominent in Baltimore Zionist circles and assisted in the refitting of the ship that became the doomed Exodus in 1947, died July 1 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Arden Courts assisted-living facility in Pikesville. The longtime Pikesville resident was 86. Mr. Schloss, who was born in Baltimore and raised in the 2200 block of E. Baltimore St. near Patterson Park, attended city public schools.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | August 29, 2006
North Carolina State defensive end Ray Brooks was academically ineligible last season, and teammate Martrel Brown was a reserve defensive tackle who never started a game. The expectations for both are a little higher this year. When the Wolfpack opens its season Saturday against Appalachian State, Brooks and Brown are the projected starters to replace two of the best ends in school history in Mario Williams and Manny Lawson on a defensive line that coach Chuck Amato described as as solid as "scrambled eggs."
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 28, 2003
BEIJING - Ignoring government pleas to stay, Wei Jisheng fled Beijing on a sold-out train last week, jamming himself in among hundreds of other migrant workers packed like so many standing sardines for a 19-hour trip to remote northeast China. In this capital city of 14 million, an authoritarian government with decades of experience at controlling its people might seem well-positioned to attack the spread of an infectious disease such as SARS. But despite announcements of a series of tough measures, people rushed out of Beijing unimpeded for days last week, crowding onto buses, trains and airplanes in an exodus exceeding 100,000 a day - perhaps approaching twice that.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
It looks like a toy boat made from yesterday's papers, a half-century old sheet of folded newsprint sailing away from the darkness of war toward the elusive light of peace.The image -- part of a 5-by-7-foot tapestry of nearly a million stitches -- represents "Exodus 1947," the Chesapeake Bay steamer from the Roaring '20s whose fate was pivotal in establishing the nation of Israel.The boat, and its reflection in the water below it, form the Star of David.The tapestry, designed by Russian artist Alex Gelfenboim, was unveiled last night at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | March 13, 2013
The Ravens said a month ago they wanted to strengthen the middle of their defense after winning the Super Bowl. They left out the part about letting more than half of their starting defenders go to accomplish that goal. On Wednesday, the Ravens released starting strong safety Bernard Pollard , a hard-hitting box safety who is a quality run defender. His release came a day after the Ravens lost inside linebacker Dannell Ellerbe and pass rusher Paul Kruger in free agency and a month after inside linebacker Ray Lewis ended his career with a title.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 15, 2013
As a child in the mid-1950s, I asked my mother why we didn't live in a modern house built of new, salmon-toned brick like my schoolmates. We lived in a traditional city neighborhood, in a three-story 1915 rowhouse. We had only a small backyard that lacked a barbecue area or swing set. A new exhibition staged by the Jewish Museum of Maryland and presented at downtown's Enoch Pratt Free Library examines this same point, and many others. "Jews on the Move: Baltimore and the Suburban Exodus, 1945-1968" demonstrates how thousands of families called up Davidson movers and took off for ranchers and split levels in greater Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2011
Stanley Zerden remembers a time in the 1970s when Oldtown held promise. Largely burned out by the 1968 riots, the area became a focus for then-Mayor William Donald Schaefer, who closed blocks of Gay Street to cars and created a revolutionary concept for the time — an inner-city pedestrian mall where people could stroll and shop. It almost worked. "It was very successful, and it was Schaefer's baby," the 62-year-old Zerden, a third-generation property owner in Oldtown, said of the now hollowed-out neighborhood east of the city's prison complex.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2010
Graduate student Nikki Meadows lives in Baltimore and wanted to stay here, but the only place where she could find work in her field was in Washington. Three weeks into the commute, she can't take it any longer. She's subletting her room in a "McMansion of a rowhome" and looking for a place in D.C. A few years ago, she would have been bucking the trend. Now, she's part of one. Though Baltimore and its suburbs still attract more people from Washington than the number of people who migrate to that pricier region, our metro area has been rapidly losing ground since the economy soured.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel | January 4, 2010
With the first decade of the 21st century having drawn to a close, Baltimore is on the verge of a major demographic development. For the first decade since the city's population decline began some 60 years ago, white flight is not the leading cause of the decrease in the number of residents - black flight is. According to the most recent census estimates, since 2000 the number of non-Hispanic whites in the city has declined by about 7,000,...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | November 2, 2009
With several longtime members retiring or running for other offices - and two whose legal woes could make them vulnerable - the Baltimore County Council is facing what could be its largest turnover in two decades. Two members, each having served four terms, are considering leaving the council to run for county executive now that the current officeholder, James T. Smith Jr., has reached the end of a two-term limit. With the longest-serving member, Vincent Gardina, opting to retire, at least three of the seven council seats could be up for grabs.
FEATURES
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1998
Siskel and Ebert may have given two thumbs up to "The Prince of Egypt." But a gathering of Baltimore clergy and religious leaders had most of their thumbs turned toward the floor.Their complaint? The animated film plays too much with the story line and misses the theological point of the book of Exodus. The group, which included about 20 representatives of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, gathered at the Senator Theatre for a showing and discussion arranged by the Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 1998
REZALA, Yugoslavia -- Hana Zabeli, an 85-year-old invalid, died alone last week. So did her village.Life ended for this ethnic Albanian settlement and its oldest inhabitant on the day Serbian paramilitary police struck, burning dozens of homes and shooting Zabeli in her bed.Zabeli and her village were abandoned in the same panic that has emptied scores of Albanian communities during an anti-guerrilla sweep of Serbia's separatist-minded Kosovo province, uprooting...
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