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Exit Outcomes

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NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | May 23, 1993
Throughout the lengthy process to develop a set of graduation standards for Carroll County public school students, a determined minority has been able to distort and twist the whole discussion.TC At its last meeting, the school board unanimously approved of the current draft of these so-called "Exit Outcomes," but the board first had to listen to harangues about imagined conspiracies to poison the minds of Carroll's children.Instead of focusing on the question of what do we expect from our children after 12 years of elementary and secondary education, this small group -- primarily conservative fundamentalists -- harped away at the supposed "liberal agenda," "socialist values" and "social engineering" contained in the proposed "Exit Outcomes."
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NEWS
October 21, 1994
Carroll voters have a very clear choice in the non-partisan race to fill two seats on the county's Board of Education. They can vote for candidates who see their mission as maintaining and improving the county's high-quality system or for candidates who seem preoccupied with finding fault with all aspects of the school system, from curriculum to counseling.The school system is far from perfect. Yet incumbent president Carolyn L. Scott has been a thoughtful moderate on the board who deserves to be returned to office.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
The Carroll County Board of Education has again refused to reconsider its unanimous May vote to adopt a list of seven broad goals, or "exit outcomes," that describe what students should know and be able to do as they go through school.At the board's meeting Wednesday, as in the previous two meetings, opponents said implemention of the exit outcomes would lead to the decay of family values and family privacy.William Bowen of Westminster asked the board in a letter to reconsider its vote.Board member Joseph D. Mish moved to reconsider the vote, but the motion died for lack of a second.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1994
The differences among the 11 candidates for Board of Education surfaced most vividly when they answered a question about outcomes-based education last night, at a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Carroll County.Candidates were asked to describe the positive and negative aspects of outcomes-based education. Most, however, saw it as positive or negative, rather than both.Outcomes-based education means setting specific goals for what students are to be able to know by the end of a unit, course and their schooling.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
"Exit outcomes" got a B last night.About 50 parents met in small groups at Liberty High School to discuss the blueprint for what their children will be expected to know by the time they graduate. Most liked the ideas, but said the language should be clearer.In one group, Tom Humphries of Taylorsville was skeptical."I'm here because I didn't like the way it sounded," said Mr. Humphries, a contractor and father of three boys. "I think we ought to stick to more basic things.""As much as he doesn't like the way it feels, I like the way it feels," said Robin Feroli, a nurse and mother.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
C Strong opposition from a group of mostly conservative, Christian parents led to a compromise yesterday as the Carroll County school board unanimously approved the controversial "exit outcomes," seven broad standards by which students -- and the curriculum -- will be measured.The outcomes stay, but the "dissident" parents will be in on the process of deriving more specific standards for each subject area and course.More than 40 people spoke for almost two hours during a six-hour school board meeting yesterday at North Carroll High School.
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 29, 1993
Members of the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce were introduced to "exit outcome" education yesterday when four local teachers presented the results of a summer workshop at the group's monthly breakfast meeting."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
A new parent group called PROBE has formed to support the outcomes approach to education in Carroll County.The group will make its debut at the county school board meeting at 9 a.m. today in Room 271 of the Courthouse Annex, 55 N. Court St."The group has formed to help support what the Carroll County school system is doing to implement exit outcomes and outcomes-based education," said M. Lynn Earp, of Westminster. Our mission is to help the parent community at large have a better understanding of what exit outcomes are really about.
NEWS
September 13, 1993
It is worth noting that on the same day that one more report bemoaning the state of American literacy was released, a group of Carroll County parents announced they had produced a 17-minute video to educate the community about outcomes-based education.The appearance of Parents Responding to Outcomes-Based Education should provide the necessary balance to a debate opponents to this particular program have skewed.Even if the state of American literacy isn't as dire as the report says (47 percent of America's adults were found to have "poor" literacy skills)
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | April 15, 1993
About a dozen parents showed up yesterday at the school board meeting to object to the "Exit Outcomes," a proposed blueprint for what Carroll County students should know by graduation."
NEWS
July 24, 1994
More than Vocal Minority Opposed Exit OutcomesI must question the reliability of sources you used to qualify your comment, "A vocal minority in the county mistook Exit Outcomes as some sinister mind-control plot," printed in your June 29 editorial, "Shilling's Legacy."I believe you have misrepresented the "vocal minority" in this county. (By the way, you get a "vocal minority" in this county on any issue).I must add that the Carroll County Times' poll last year said 94 percent of the county agreed with the "vocal minority."
NEWS
June 29, 1994
When R. Edward Shilling announced last spring that he was retiring as superintendent of the Carroll County public schools, many people wondered out loud about the state of his health. He had lost considerable weight over the past couple of years, hadn't he? Mr. Shilling's explanation: He had taken up jogging and sweated off the pounds while logging 35 to 40 miles a week.In the seven years he led the Carroll school system, he put theeducation department on a fitness kick of its own. The schools are undoubtedly in better shape now than when Mr. Shilling began.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1994
Incumbent Carolyn L. Scott will run for a second term on the Carroll County Board of Education, facing at least two challengers so far for the two available seats.John D. Myers, the other incumbent, said he has not decided whether he will run.Ms. Scott yesterday filed for re-election. She was elected to a six-year term in 1988. State law has since limited school board terms to four years."I believe it's an extremely important job," she said. "I feel I've gained the experience on the board all these years, and I feel it's my responsibility to use that experience for the good of the county."
NEWS
By Staff Report | January 3, 1994
One school closed, one was sick and another twice failed to open on schedule.Carroll residents suffered from and responded to severe weather.And several prominent public officials retired, resigned or were fired.No major scandals surfaced in Carroll County in 1993, and the political scene was relatively harmonious -- with the exception of Manchester.The year also saw two triple-fatality traffic accidents, a drug-related shooting and a double homicide.Here, in no particular order, are some of the year's top stories:Schools* Parents complained that Sykesville Middle School was grossly overcrowded and urged the county commissioners to speed construction of the planned Oklahoma Road Middle School.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | October 25, 1993
Liberals and the so-called "New Age" movement are converting children right in front of their parents, a Dallas activist and opponent of such philosophies told an audience of about 20 conservative Christians from Carroll County and Pennsylvania at a seminar Saturday in Hampstead.Jobe Martin, a former dentist, used dozens of quotes, magazine articles and passages of Scripture to make his point during the all-day event, titled "Outcomes-based Education and the New Age Movement."He said the New Age movement, a loose term that includes a variety of beliefs involving spirituality, personal growth and holistic medicine, is trying to spread an anti-Christian religion that is based on Eastern religions, paganism and Satanism.
NEWS
October 3, 1993
Making Workers, Not ThinkersThis letter was prompted by the extensive article in The Sun Aug. 29 regarding Exit Outcomes as being installed in our schools. Let me state up front that I am not a member nor supporter of the Citizens for Quality Education group. However, the omissions, flaws and philosophy of the program are too significant for me to ignore.I must start with the omissions of the seven outcomes. What bothers me is that only one of seven bears a direct relationship with education, that being the goal of "able communicators."
NEWS
June 29, 1994
When R. Edward Shilling announced last spring that he was retiring as superintendent of the Carroll County public schools, many people wondered out loud about the state of his health. He had lost considerable weight over the past couple of years, hadn't he? Mr. Shilling's explanation: He had taken up jogging and sweated off the pounds while logging 35 to 40 miles a week.In the seven years he led the Carroll school system, he put theeducation department on a fitness kick of its own. The schools are undoubtedly in better shape now than when Mr. Shilling began.
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 29, 1993
Members of the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce were introduced to "exit outcome" education yesterday when four local teachers presented the results of a summer workshop at the group's monthly breakfast meeting."
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