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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Some parent groups and lawmakers yesterday criticized a proposal to make funding for school projects related to growth around Maryland's military bases a priority, saying pressing needs for the state's existing schools would be pushed aside. "There are thousands of Maryland children now occupying schools that desperately need renovation, where heat is not predictably regulated, without adequate lighting, science labs and other facility basics," said Bebe Verdery, education reform project director with the Maryland chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union.
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NEWS
January 29, 2012
The proposal to rapidly overhaul Baltimore's aging school facilities that district CEO Andrés Alonso presented to a state Senate committee last week represents one of the most important and innovative ideas the city has offered in recent years to break out of its cycle of poverty and disinvestment. Baltimore cannot flourish without high-quality public schools, and although students have made impressive gains in recent years, the city will not be able to attract and retain families if children are trying to learn in dilapidated facilities.
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NEWS
August 27, 1992
At Howard County's spanking new Burleigh Manor Middle School, the industrial arts room will have a computer that allows students to design their own robots before they assemble them on the premises. And that is not all. Tucked in the county's wealthiest school district, Burleigh Manor has laser video disc players in its library, Nautilus machines in its "wellness laboratory," a fancy Jenn-Air range in home economics and a color television and rocking chair in every classroom. (The rocking chairs offer a comfortable environment whenever teachers or students need it.)
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Some parent groups and lawmakers yesterday criticized a proposal to make funding for school projects related to growth around Maryland's military bases a priority, saying pressing needs for the state's existing schools would be pushed aside. "There are thousands of Maryland children now occupying schools that desperately need renovation, where heat is not predictably regulated, without adequate lighting, science labs and other facility basics," said Bebe Verdery, education reform project director with the Maryland chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 5, 2003
MRS. MULLER'S sixth-graders are playing a game they've made up, called Geography Bingo. Mrs. DeBolt's eighth-graders are sketching pictures of Flintstone characters, which they will then magnify section by section as a lesson in mathematical scale. Mr. French's kids are gathered around a TV set to watch Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds. "A lesson in fear," whispers Diane Issel. She is director of the Midtown Academy, a city public school in the former Corpus Christi building at Mount Royal and Lafayette, near the Maryland Institute College of Art. It feels like a little village of learning around here.
NEWS
August 28, 2005
ISSUE: Harford County Councilman Dion F. Guthrie has introduced a measure to extend the county's adequate public facilities law, which halts the preliminary approval of new housing construction in any school district with a school exceeding capacity by 5 percent. Councilman Richard C. Slutzky said the law has served its purpose and will not be needed when it expires in 2007 because construction of the new Patterson Mill middle and high school complex will be nearing completion. Moreover, Slutzky said state contributions to school construction could be in jeopardy because the state typically does not consider approving financing for a new school unless the capacity of existing schools is 115 percent or more.
NEWS
May 27, 1992
Chris Whittle sure knows how to get attention.Yesterday, Benno C. Schmidt Jr. quit as the president of Yale University to run the Edison Project, an effort by Mr. Whittle to develop a nationwide network of private schools. The goals, set by Mr. Whittle, a brash Tennessee entrepreneur, are to operate the schools at the same per-pupil cost as public schools (about $5,500 per student), to outperform the public schools by concentrating resources in technology instead of bureaucracy, and to make a profit.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1995
The county Planning Commission went to school yesterday, studying how to slow development in areas where new homes would mean more crowded classrooms.After agreeing in September to halt residential construction near elementary schools that are above capacity, the commission is grappling with rules on adequate public facilities that will define how and when enrollment could justify denying approval for future development.Seven county elementary schools are above capacity, four in the Eldersburg area, two in Westminster and one in Hampstead.
NEWS
July 28, 2001
MANY SUBURBAN taxpayers want government to do everything possible to control costs - except when money helps their own neighborhood. Then government spending on local pork is cherished. But wasteful spending at home is still waste. Two examples of community-supported excess come from Anne Arundel County, where, in a 1992 referendum, citizens voted to impose a tax revenue cap to check government spending. In one case, the southern Arundel community of Mayo persuaded the school board to reject a relatively inexpensive way to rebuild its aging elementary school.
NEWS
July 12, 1995
It is interesting how the Anne Arundel County Board of Education has made County Executive John G. Gary look like the bad guy for signing off on new development in Crofton, where Arundel High supposedly will have 1,000 students too many by the year 2000. Board members act as if the county sprung this on them from out of the blue. But these developers were seeking waivers from the county's adequate facilities regulations, which forbid building in areas with overcrowded schools, long before Mr. Gary was elected.
NEWS
August 28, 2005
ISSUE: Harford County Councilman Dion F. Guthrie has introduced a measure to extend the county's adequate public facilities law, which halts the preliminary approval of new housing construction in any school district with a school exceeding capacity by 5 percent. Councilman Richard C. Slutzky said the law has served its purpose and will not be needed when it expires in 2007 because construction of the new Patterson Mill middle and high school complex will be nearing completion. Moreover, Slutzky said state contributions to school construction could be in jeopardy because the state typically does not consider approving financing for a new school unless the capacity of existing schools is 115 percent or more.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2005
Less than seven months before Baltimore's first wave of new charter schools is scheduled to arrive, the schools' operators still do not know how much money they will receive from the city school system -- leaving them unable to hire teachers, sign leases for buildings and secure grants. City school officials have been grappling for months with how much public funding to give the five charter schools opening this fall across the city. The schools will be funded by taxpayer dollars and held to state performance standards, but will have autonomy in areas such as whom they hire and how they teach.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 5, 2003
MRS. MULLER'S sixth-graders are playing a game they've made up, called Geography Bingo. Mrs. DeBolt's eighth-graders are sketching pictures of Flintstone characters, which they will then magnify section by section as a lesson in mathematical scale. Mr. French's kids are gathered around a TV set to watch Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds. "A lesson in fear," whispers Diane Issel. She is director of the Midtown Academy, a city public school in the former Corpus Christi building at Mount Royal and Lafayette, near the Maryland Institute College of Art. It feels like a little village of learning around here.
NEWS
July 28, 2001
MANY SUBURBAN taxpayers want government to do everything possible to control costs - except when money helps their own neighborhood. Then government spending on local pork is cherished. But wasteful spending at home is still waste. Two examples of community-supported excess come from Anne Arundel County, where, in a 1992 referendum, citizens voted to impose a tax revenue cap to check government spending. In one case, the southern Arundel community of Mayo persuaded the school board to reject a relatively inexpensive way to rebuild its aging elementary school.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erika D. Peterman and Michael Dresser and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1999
Howard County schools will get $16 million in state construction money next year, helping to pay for two new middle schools and additions and renovations to others.The money, announced yesterday by Gov. Parris N. Glendening as Howard County's share of a statewide package of $257 million, was more than the $13.4 million the county received this year.Schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey said he was "very appreciative."State officials previously had allocated Howard $9.8 million; yesterday's announcement of an additional $6.2 million brought the total to $16 million.
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
Starting in July, the area around Deep Run, Elkridge, Ilchester, Rockburn, Waterloo and Worthington Elementary schools in northeastern Howard County likely will be made off limits to developers for the next four years, as a means of preventing school overcrowding.Maurice Kalin, associate schools superintendent, proposed the moratorium in a report to the county's chief planner, Joseph W. Rutter Jr., who expects the County Council to approve it. The decision would take effect July 6. Any project approved before then could proceed.
NEWS
October 3, 1995
AMONG THE occasionally frustrating features of government is its slow pace. Of course, going slow can be an asset, too, as it was when the Howard County Board of Education last week decided to delay a decision on whether to increase the capacity of two local high schools to 1,600 students apiece.Board members wisely concluded that they needed more time to consider the ramifications of such a decision. A public hearing on the matter will be held Thursday, with a final decision not expected until Oct. 12. That gives the board additional time, though not much, to digest the impact of increasing the current capacity of high schools by a third, or 400 students.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker yesterday announced he would set aside an additional $9 million for construction of new schools and upgrades for existing schools -- including $2.3 million he had cut out of a budget requested by school officials.The funds will include $6.6 million to fill a funding gap created when state construction money announced earlier this month was less than requested.Ecker said school officials can allocate the extra funds as they see fit -- but specified that the money cannot be used to plan a new high school.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | December 27, 1998
GOV. PARRIS N. Glendening is thinking about the L-word these days. That's L as in legacy, not liberal.He easily won re-election and he can't run for a third term. So Mr. Glendening doesn't have to position himself for the next campaign or try to please everyone.Instead, he is taking a long-range view -- what George Bush called "the vision thing."How does he want to be remembered? What will he leave behind as his monument?He mentions three priorities during a recent interview in his State House office.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1998
Baltimore schools chief Robert Booker has temporarily suspended the creation of city public schools run by nonprofit organizations, saying he wants to evaluate the track record of the first nine.In the past two years, the city school board has allowed nonprofit organizations to start four schools and take over five others. Neighborhood groups, churches and foundations have been involved in the effort."My recommendation to the board was that we not expand next year. While it looked promising, there still needs to be some additional evaluation," Booker said.
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