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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
Green Mount Cemetery's attorneys have asked a judge to deny a request to exhume the purported remains of John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of Abraham Lincoln.The attorneys, William C. Trimble, who is also president of the cemetery board, and Francis J. Gorman, said the petition filed by Booth relatives contains neither substantial evidence nor substantial reason to justify disinterment.May 18 hearingBaltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan has scheduled a hearing May 18 on the exhumation request, submitted in October by Booth relatives, including those who hold the 1869 certificate of ownership of the burial plot.
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NEWS
March 25, 2007
New York -- Get ready for CSI: Houdini. A team of forensic experts will pore over the exhumed remains of renowned escape artist Harry Houdini to determine whether he was killed 81 years ago, the head of the investigative team said last week. "Everything will be thoroughly analyzed," promised James Starrs, dean of the disinterment dream team of pathologists, anthropologists, toxicologists and radiologists. "We'll examine his hairs, his fingernails, any bone fractures." Legal paperwork necessary to dig up Houdini's body from a New York City cemetery will be filed tomorrow to get the process started, said Joseph Tacopina, an attorney representing Houdini's family.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1995
John Wilkes Booth will continue to rest in peace -- wherever he is.Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan yesterday denied a petition by two Booth family members for exhumation of the remains in a Baltimore cemetery.The aim was to resolve a century of questions about whether Abraham Lincoln's assassin really was cornered and shot by federal troops in 1865, as the history books say, and later interred in the Booth family plot in Green Mount Cemetery.The decision was a defeat for Nathaniel Orlowek and Arthur Ben Chitty, researchers and conspiracy buffs who say Booth escaped, forcing the government to cover up by burying someone else in his place.
NEWS
By Charles Sheehan and Charles Sheehan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 2, 2005
ALSIP, Ill. - The earth above Emmett Till's grave was scraped away just after dawn yesterday, and steel cables hoisted his burial vault from the ground as family members prayed nearby. The barrel-topped concrete vault containing Till's metal casket was raised to a flatbed truck and covered in a blue tarp. Seven squad cars then escorted the remains on the 20-mile trip to Chicago, where forensics experts waited to see whether they would shed new light on a murder that helped ignite the civil rights movement.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
Challenges to the government claim that Union troops killed John Wilkes Booth in a Virginia barn 12 days after he assassinated President Lincoln have been around for 126 years yet show no sign of aging.Now, Nathaniel Orlowek, 33, an assassination buff since he was 15, says the issue can be resolved by exhuming the body that was buried as Booth's in 1869 in Green Mount Cemetery to let modern science try to identify it.Mr. Orlowek and Dr. Arthur Ben Chitty, 77, of the University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 28, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Fourteen years after being laid to rest at the Tomb of the Unknowns, the remains of a Vietnam War serviceman may soon be disinterred in an unprecedented, high-tech effort to determine whether they belong to an Air Force pilot who crashed in 1972.A Pentagon panel recommended yesterday that Defense Secretary William S. Cohen approve the first-ever removal of a body from the gleaming marble memorial at Arlington National Cemetery that has been visited by millions of tourists."There are concerns about the sanctity of the Tomb," Charles Cragin, assistant secretary of defense for reserve affairs, told reporters.
NEWS
By John Bebow and Dawn Turner Trice and John Bebow and Dawn Turner Trice,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 5, 2005
CHICAGO - Fifty years ago, Mamie Till Mobley demanded an open casket for her 14-year-old son so the world could see the brutality of Southern racism. Now that casket will be opened once again, by investigators still seeking justice for Emmett Till, the teen who paid with his life after allegedly whistling at a white woman in Mississippi. Federal agents said yesterday that they will exhume the body at Till's grave site in suburban Alsipin, Ill., in the next few weeks for an autopsy to confirm Till's identity and cause of death, said Joyce Chiles, a Mississippi prosecutor who is leading the investigation.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
A Baltimore Circuit Court hearing has been set for May 18 on the request to exhume the purported remains of John Wilkes Booth, Abraham Lincoln's assassin, from Green Mount Cemetery for positive identification.Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan set the hearing after meeting last week with Mark S. Zaid, the Washington lawyer who filed the request, and William C. Trimble Jr. chairman of Green Mount's board of directors and its attorney.Judge Kaplan, himself a Civil War buff, yesterday called the case "very interesting" and said, "I want it done right."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
John Wilkes Booth hid from federal troops for 12 days after he shot President Abraham Lincoln.And Green Mount Cemetery officials in Baltimore say Mr. Booth has been hiding from them for most of the 126 years that have passed since he was buried in the family plot."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1995
Dueling historians in the John Wilkes Booth exhumation case insisted yesterday there is no evidence to support their opponents' arguments about what happened to Booth after he killed Abraham Lincoln in 1865.Dr. William Hanchett, an emeritus professor of history at San Diego State University, testified that Booth's body was identified so many times after he was shot by soldiers that "it is inconceivable that there could be any doubt about whether he is in his tomb. I can see no reason to justify his exhumation."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
P. Raab Christhilf grows more and more enthusiastic every time he turns over a new sketch or watercolor of the Victorian furniture and interior design from the collection of the Henry W. Jenkins & Sons Co. Christhilf loves this stuff. He's the fine arts appraiser for Alex Cooper Auctioneers, which is selling the collection tomorrow. The plans and drawings coming out of 26 dark gray archival boxes illustrate the taste of the richest generation of Baltimoreans, the generation that flowered in the late 19th century.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 22, 2003
In a posthumous family feud that has gossip columnists from New York to Palm Beach, Fla., abuzz, a Monkton man of prominent and notorious lineage wants his father's body exhumed and autopsied, seeking evidence for what he considers a suspicious death and his stepmother's odd behavior in its aftermath. F. Warrington Gillet III, 40, a descendant of the Tydings family whose own colorful background includes an acting role in a classic slasher movie and a part in a Wall Street scandal, says his father was in perfect health when he died in May. His father, F. Warrington Gillet Jr., 71, was a Realtor and a former liquor distributor in Maryland who had moved to Palm Beach about 35 years ago. "I just want justice done," Gillet said yesterday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2002
BAGRAM AIR BASE, Afghanistan - Canadian troops and U.S. criminal investigators working at a grave site in the Tora Bora Mountains have exhumed 23 bodies that they suspect are those of al-Qaida fighters, perhaps a security contingent for Osama bin Laden. The bodies, buried in graves near the village of Al-e-Khel, might be those of senior lieutenants or security guards of bin Laden who were killed in an airstrike Dec. 15, said Lt. Col. Patrick Stogran, who conducted the search. "I am hopeful that it was bin Laden himself, but the chances are he wasn't there," Stogran said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The remains of an unidentified American serviceman from the Vietnam War, buried beneath the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery 14 years ago, are no longer unknown.They belong to 1st Lt. Michael Blassie of the Air Force, a pilot whose attack jet crashed on May 11, 1972, near a village in South Vietnam called An Loc. He was 24 at the time and ever since has, officially, been considered missing in action.A new type of genetic test -- not available when President Reagan honored the "Unknown Soldier" from the Vietnam War at a solemn, symbolic state funeral on Memorial Day in 1984 -- has matched DNA taken from the remains with DNA from Blassie's mother, Pentagon officials said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 28, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Fourteen years after being laid to rest at the Tomb of the Unknowns, the remains of a Vietnam War serviceman may soon be disinterred in an unprecedented, high-tech effort to determine whether they belong to an Air Force pilot who crashed in 1972.A Pentagon panel recommended yesterday that Defense Secretary William S. Cohen approve the first-ever removal of a body from the gleaming marble memorial at Arlington National Cemetery that has been visited by millions of tourists."There are concerns about the sanctity of the Tomb," Charles Cragin, assistant secretary of defense for reserve affairs, told reporters.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
With a yellowed and snaggle-toothed skull in his hands, Professor James E. Starrs struts before his George Washington University law students like Hamlet at the grave of Yorick.He's discussing physical anthropology. But you almost expect him to declaim: "Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him well, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy ..."Dr. Starrs does have a lot of the theatrical about him. He's easily one of America's most famous forensic scientists, an academic sleuth investigating historical mysteries with everything from ground-searching radar to exhumation.
NEWS
By Robert Erlandson and Robert Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
A Baltimore Circuit judge was to decide today whether to permit exhumation of the remains buried as Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth for possible positive identification.Four days of testimony and argument ended yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court before Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan, who will decide whether the request is simple curiosity, or a genuine historical controversy that might be resolved by digging up the grave in Green Mount Cemetery.Mark S. Zaid, lawyer for Booth relatives seeking exhumation, argued that there has been a controversy since 1865 whether Booth escaped from Federal troops at a Northern Virginia farm April 26, 12 days after he shot President Abraham Lincoln in Washington.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1996
They're still trying to dig up John Wilkes Booth -- or whoever is in his grave in Baltimore's Green Mount Cemetery.Booth relatives who want to disinter the body buried in 1869 as that of President Lincoln's assassin will ask the Court of Special Appeals today to authorize the exhumation.Saying the case concerns "the preservation of the accuracy of American history," Mark S. Zaid, lawyer for the Booth relatives, is asking the court to help "expose a 130-year-old historical fraud."Booth shot the president in Ford's Theater in Washington, April 14, 1865.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
ANNAPOLIS -- No legitimate historical controversy exists and John Wilkes Booth "should be left to rest in peace," the lawyer for Green Mount Cemetery told the Court of Special Appeals yesterday.Francis J. Gorman urged the three-judge panel to uphold Baltimore City Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan's ruling last May that there is "no compelling reason" to exhume the body of the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln.Distant Booth relatives asked the court to allow the disinterment to establish finally whether Booth is in the grave or whether he escaped and died years later -- as one long-standing theory holds.
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