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By Clarence Page | January 3, 1996
WASHINGTON -- My friend Jack was highly annoyed. His wife did not want to go with him to see ''Waiting to Exhale.'' She wanted to go with some other women. Other black women.''It's one of those woman things,'' Jack grumbled. ''One of those black woman things.''Poor Jack. He's not alone. Across the country, a new creature has appeared on the scene: the ''Waiting to Exhale'' widower. These men are left behind by the million-plus women's march to movie houses to see director Forest Whitaker's adaptation of Terry McMillan's best-seller about the travails of a quartet of modern single black women.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
It is in Elsa Walsh's warm and unpretentious nature that she would not toss her husband's name around like confetti. So when architect Stephen Muse raced back from looking at a piece of waterfront property to tell her how amazing it was and how much he wanted to design a home for it, he didn't realize that the "Bob" in the "Bob and I" she kept talking about was Bob Woodward until the noted Watergate journalist and presidential reporter opened the...
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FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 22, 1995
Let's get this much straight from the start: "Waiting to Exhale" (Arista 18796) is not the new Whitney Houston album.That's not because it's a soundtrack album. After all, "The Bodyguard" was a soundtrack, too, and like "Waiting to Exhale" included tracks by other singers. But Houston was clearly the star of that album and generated the album's only hits."Waiting to Exhale," on the other hand, is more an ensemble piece. Some of that has to do with the fact that Houston only appears on three tracks (one of them a duet with CeCe Winans)
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Liz Bowie and Bradley Olson and Liz Bowie,Sun reporters | February 6, 2008
Legislators breathed a sigh of relief yesterday at the news that Gov. Martin O'Malley had abandoned his attempt to oust state schools chief Nancy S. Grasmick, knowing they wouldn't be forced to choose between loyalty to the governor and to constituents who had no interest in seeing the superintendent fired. Top General Assembly leaders and aides to the governor have asserted that a bill seeking to nullify her recently renewed contract would have passed, but rank-and-file members were less certain that enough legislators would have signed on to fire her at a time when Maryland schools are ranked among the nation's best.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1995
If it's true that your ears burn when they're talking about you somewhere, then the next several weeks will see a plague of fiery lobes visited upon the male side of the gender gulf.And maybe the ears won't be the only things that sting!Like, ouch! The film version of Terry McMillan's "Waiting toExhale" turns out to be colossally entertaining but darkly bitter. McMillan's chronicle of four middle-class African-American women and their hunt for a few good men is angry, corrosive and nasty.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1995
WARNING: "Men. If you must see the movie 'Waiting to Exhale,' GO ALONE! Repeat: GO ALONE! Do not see it with your women!"Radio disc jockeys have been jokingly issuing this warning over the airwaves for the past month. At one local nightclub last week, a DJ told the men that it would be the last weekend for them to "get some good loving" for a while.The much-anticipated movie version of the best-selling Terry McMillan novel opened yesterday. Men know there's no chance of keeping their women from seeing "the sisterhood movie of the year."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 28, 1996
When the 38th annual Grammy Awards ceremonies get under way at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles this evening, you'll probably see a lot of stars shifting nervously in their seats as they await the words, "and the winner is . . ."But if the TV cameras happen to pick Babyface out of the crowd, don't be surprised if he looks cool as a cucumber. He's one musician who doesn't go in for the pins-and-needles approach to awards shows."You never know what's going to happen," he explains, over the phone from his Atlanta offices.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 24, 1995
They do make an odd couple.He's as mild-looking as they come, a smooth, unflappable man in the comfy, anti-style wardrobe of a National Public Radio talk-show host, complete to the beard and horn-rim glasses, the cardigan sweater, the open collar and the well-broken-in shoes.She's who she is, dammit, and she doesn't care who knows about it or what they think. In cowboy boots, black leather jeans, a black velvet blazer and a white lace turtleneck, she's a woman no man would mess with. Her hair is gathered in a garland of tendrils, but her face isn't soft or sweet at all; it's tough, proud, beautiful and not the sort of a face to take anything off anybody.
NEWS
By Jocelyn McClurg and Jocelyn McClurg,Hartford Courant | May 12, 1996
"How Stella Got Her Groove Back," by Terry McMillan. Viking. 368 pages. $23.95What saves this book from sheer sappiness is the tell-it-like-it-is voice that the author honed to smart-mouthed perfection in 1992's "Waiting To Exhale" and that she resurrects here in the person of Stella Payne.As a narrator, Stella gives James Joyce a run for his stream-of-consciousness money. In profanity-drenched run-on-and-on sentences, Stella offers her two cents on everything from the hollowness of corporate America to violence in the 'hood to the fine art of douching.
NEWS
By Sherryl Connelly and Sherryl Connelly,New York Daily News | May 24, 1992
WAITING TO EXHALE. Terry McMillan. Viking.409 pages. $22. Savannah is close onto 40, caring, smart and, incidentally, quite attractive.Robin, who relies on astrology and numerology to guide her through life, is totally accommodating when she meets a man these days.For a good time, don't call Gloria, who is too busy rearing her teen-age son and running her beauty salon to find the antidote to her celibacy.Don't call Beverly, either. Her husband hasn't run off with that young white girl yet. But he will.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | September 1, 2007
BOSTON -- When Dave Trembley walked into the law office of Peter Angelos on Thursday, the Orioles' new manager meeting the team's owner for the first time, they shook hands and Trembley was given an immediate piece of advice. "The first thing that he said to me was, `Dave, don't look so dejected,' " Trembley said before last night's game. "He knows what's going on here. ... I needed [that]." Orioles @Red Sox Tonight, 7:05, MASN, 102.7 FM Starters: Garrett Olson (1-2, 7.33) vs. Clay Buchholz (1-0, 4.50)
FEATURES
May 12, 2006
THE QUESTION Reader Miriam Tillman, writing from UMBC, suggested this week's question: What song or piece of music will never be the same for you again after hearing it in a particular film? (The two that came to her mind are "Stuck in the Middle with You" in Reservoir Dogs, and "Singin' in the Rain" in A Clockwork Orange.) WHAT YOU SAY "Tomorrow (The Sun'll Come Out Tomorrow)," from Annie, is one of those songs I've never been able to stand; it had the same effect on me as fingernails on a chalkboard does for many others.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | September 3, 2004
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - It seemed like some things were just beginning to click last night against the New York Giants. The short passing game was on, led by receiver Kevin Johnson. Quarterback Kyle Boller was hot and elusive, giving fans hope for the future. The Ravens actually had balance, not just on offense, but between a dominating defense and an offense that complemented it. And then the giant went down, with enough force to make an entire organization hold its collective breath.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | June 24, 2004
NEW YORK Yankees catcher Jorge Posada began noticing the different looks on Orioles manager Lee Mazzilli's face Tuesday night when Orioles pitchers walked a season-high 13 batters. There was frustration and disbelief. At times, Mazzilli seemed despondent. "I felt bad for him," Posada said. There were different expressions last night as the Orioles defeated the Yankees, 13-2, at Camden Yards. They used to call this series a rivalry, but teams trade wins and losses in rivalries. The Orioles had just become punching bags, victims of overwhelming abuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 5, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Just when yoga enthusiasts thought they'd seen it all - yoga with spinning, yoga with Sinatra music - comes this: yoga with your schnauzer. Perhaps it speaks to the fact that we humans will try almost anything that inspires us to work out. But dogs and yoga do have a link - canines have been the influence, after all, for standard poses such as downward facing dog and upward facing dog. Crunch gym in West Hollywood launched Ruff Yoga this month, when instructor Heather Stevens led a class of seven humans and their canines through several poses.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2003
Here comes the sun." Ruth Ann Mintiens' perfect call came at 5:55 a.m. from a folding chair at Pimlico Race Course. She and her friend Marianne Tartal are here for "Sunrise at Old Hilltop" - doughnuts, coffee and horse watching. They have been exposed to a ridiculous idea. The idea, hatched in caffeine, is to have a 6 a.m. post time for the Preakness. You know, run the race as the sun aims its spotlight right into your eyeballs in the grandstand. Skip the madness. All the cameras and pretty hats would be asleep.
FEATURES
May 12, 2006
THE QUESTION Reader Miriam Tillman, writing from UMBC, suggested this week's question: What song or piece of music will never be the same for you again after hearing it in a particular film? (The two that came to her mind are "Stuck in the Middle with You" in Reservoir Dogs, and "Singin' in the Rain" in A Clockwork Orange.) WHAT YOU SAY "Tomorrow (The Sun'll Come Out Tomorrow)," from Annie, is one of those songs I've never been able to stand; it had the same effect on me as fingernails on a chalkboard does for many others.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 9, 1997
"Finally, Hollywood is realizing that gangs are not the only African-American story."That quote is attributed to Chris Hewitt of the St. Paul (Minn.) Pioneer Press. He was commenting about the movie "Love Jones," which was released in mid-March and actually made the top-10 movie list for at least one week."Love Jones" is a love story that stars Larenz Tate, he of "Menace II Society" and "Dead Presidents" fame. In "Menace," Tate played the terrifyingly homicidal O-Dog who, in the opening scene, murders two Korean merchants.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2002
Montgomery County awoke yesterday as if from a terrifying dream and saw the world begin to come slowly back into focus. Suddenly, Halloween pumpkins mattered again. And fall colors. And all the other small pleasures people savor when they're not filled with dread or steely determination to keep themselves and loved ones safe. With the capture of two suspects in the string of sniper slayings, many in the suburban Washington county - still shaken, grieving and angry - started to trust enough to stop looking over their shoulders.
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