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BUSINESS
December 11, 1995
Below are recent insider transactions of 1,000 shares or more for publicly held companies based in Maryland or having substantial operations in the state. Insiders are officers, directors or owners of 10 percent or more of a corporation's stock.First Fidelity BancorpMichael L. Larusso, vice president, exercised an option for 21,955 shares of common between $21.06 and $45.38 each on Oct. 24, 1995, and now directly holds 36,163 common.AJames L. Mitchell, vice president, exercised an option for 21,424 shares of common between $26.13 and $45.38 each on Oct. 25, 1995, and now directly holds 38,089 common.
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NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Anyone who's watched the final leg of the Preakness recognizes that both horses and the people who ride them are impressive athletes. But horse and rider don't have to be Triple Crown contenders to get a good workout - even an introductory lesson works muscles all over the body. As a bonus, learning to ride exercises the mind, too. At Graham Equestrian Center (GEC), a nonprofit horse boarding and instruction facility in Gunpowder State Park, an hourlong private lesson began inside a small office, where professional horse trainer Jim McDonald instructed me on the key tenets of horsemanship and riding - from keeping a soft, open gaze to staying grounded through the horse - as I perched atop “Missy,” a mechanical horse McDonald uses to teach students.
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BUSINESS
December 4, 2000
Petroleum & Resources Lawrence L. Hooper, vice president, exercised an option for 1,000 shares of common at $36.88 each Oct. 3. Hooper turned in 1,000 and now directly and indirectly holds 1,072 shares. Maureen A. Jones, vice president, exercised an option for 1,767 shares of common at $29.13 each Oct. 4. Jones turned in 1,767 of them and now directly and indirectly holds 1,748. Richard F. Koloski, president, exercised an option for 11,249 shares of common at $10.20 to $13.82 each from Oct. 4 to Oct. 24. Koloski turned in 11,249 shares and now directly and indirectly holds 24,238 shares.
SPORTS
By Marissa Laliberte and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
LEONARDTOWN -- "The rings are hung; the track is clear. Charge, fair maiden. " Upon the announcer's command, Mikayla Miller of St. Leonard, aboard the horse Tyke, raced down an 80-foot jousting course, lance in hand. Covering the distance in less than 9 seconds and keeping her arm and upper body as still as possible, she rode through three arches and speared the half-inch ring hanging from each of them. Competing at the St. Mary's County Fair Joust tournament last weekend, the semiprofessional rider performed well enough to qualify at that level for the state championship next Saturday in Crownsville.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2000
Below are insider transactions for publicly held companies based in Maryland or having substantial operations here. Insiders are officers, directors or owners of 10 percent or more of a corporation's stock. General Motors Corp. John G. Middlebrook, vice president, exercised an option for 4,696 shares of common at $40.07 to $46.59 each Dec. 9. To cover transaction expenses, Middlebrook turned in 2,764 of them, now directly and indirectly holds 27,401. Richard C. Nerod, divisional officer, exercised an option for 3,981 shares at $40.07 to $44.73 each Dec. 16. To cover expenses of the transaction, Nerod turned in 2,289 of them and now directly and indirectly holds 17,001.
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
At age 23, Malarie Burgess couldn't fit into restaurant booths, she had to buy clothes online, and she endured stares and comments from strangers, particularly children. The year was 2010, and she weighed 350 pounds. "I had kind of fooled myself into thinking I was OK," recalled Burgess, who grew up in Westminster. But then a family friend sat her down and urged her to change. "She said she was worried about my health," Burgess said of the friend. "Initially, I was very offended.
SPORTS
By Amanda Ghysel and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Elizabeth McPherson hits the ground with a thud, an audible gasp of air escaping her lungs. But the rugby rookie's first thought when she lands is that her mother is going to kill her. "She was worried when my sister, who is 6 feet tall and larger-framed than I, played, so I'd been putting off telling her," jokes McPherson, 33, of Mount Vernon, who had told her mother only earlier that day that she had joined the Chesapeake Women's Rugby Club the...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
The voice of the water taxi operator off Canton came over the radio Wednesday morning. "We're taking on water," he said. "I think sinking or capsizing is imminent. " Emergency responders listening to their radios at a nearby pier immediately shifted into gear, readying themselves for the start of a mock exercise rescuing dozens of overboard victims in the Inner Harbor. The energy was apparent, if somewhat awkward. "You want to try to do good on these things," said Skip Minter, a longtime boat pilot for the Baltimore Fire Department, whose job was to maneuver out to the training scene — dozens of life jackets strewn about in the water — and return the "victims" back to shore.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 6, 2014
As the holiday weekend draws to a close, please pause from the cookouts and fireworks to reflect on the meaning of this freedom we've been celebrating, knowingly or not. When 50 years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he placed it in the context of "a long struggle for freedom" that began when the Founding Fathers adopted the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. "They pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor, not only to found a nation, but to forge an ideal of freedom; not only for political independence, but for personal liberty; not only to eliminate foreign rule, but to establish the rule of justice in the affairs of men. " Now, we know that the noble ideal of 1776 did not really embrace blacks, women, Native Americans or whites without property.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 25, 2014
In Ukraine last month, some people braved the threat of violence to get to the polls to vote for a new president. According to news reports, heavily armed men in ski masks tried to scare off voters by smashing ballot boxes and blocking entry to polling stations in the eastern part of the country; election officials were threatened, some kidnapped. In Maryland, we just had a primary election to nominate candidates for governor - you know, like the president of Maryland - and the voter turnout was embarrassingly low . The vast majority of registered Democrats and Republicans did not participate.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The Army is planning to launch a pair of blimps over Maryland this fall to watch the Eastern Seaboard for incoming cruise missiles. It's what else they might be able to see from up there that worries privacy advocates. The Army says the aerostats — blimps that will be tethered to the ground in Harford and Baltimore counties — will carry technology capable of detecting, tracking and targeting cruise missiles and rockets up to 340 miles away. That means they can cover an area from North Carolina to the Canadian border.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
As Russia's actions in Ukraine rattle its neighbors, the Maryland National Guard is affirming its decades-long partnership with Estonia. Maryland has helped to train Estonian troops since shortly after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Now it's preparing to send A-10 pilots and liaison officers to Saber Strike, an annual U.S.-led security exercise that focuses on Estonia and its Baltic neighbors Latvia and Lithuania. The commander of the Maryland Guard traveled to Estonia last week for meetings with Northern European defense ministers and U.S. military leaders.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
A 58-year-old Baltimore County firefighter died Friday afternoon after he suffered a suspected heart attack during training, officials said. Robert Fogle III, a 27-year veteran and career firefighter, was participating in exercises at the Sparrows Point training facility when he became ill. He was taken to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. "It just reminds us about the sacrifice that our first responders do each and every day and the risks that they take to be fit and capable of helping others," Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said.
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