Advertisement
HomeCollectionsExercise Physiology
IN THE NEWS

Exercise Physiology

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | February 26, 1992
Edward J. Zambraski, chairman of exercise science and sport studies at Rutgers University, says the equine industry devotes just one-halfof 1 percent of its $15 billion economic impact to research on horses."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2013
William C. Stanley, a cardiovascular physiologist who made connections around the world for his research and loved outdoor exercise, died Oct. 21 in Australia of a heart attack. He was 56. Dr. Stanley lived in Baltimore for about six years — working for the University of Maryland School of Medicine — before moving overseas in January to become chair of cardiovascular physiology at the University of Sydney. A California native, he grew up outdoors, often camping and kayaking with his family.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By MARY B. BRECKENRIDGE and MARY B. BRECKENRIDGE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 24, 2006
Fitness can be as close as your own backyard. Who needs gym memberships and Bowflex machines when you have a yard to take care of? Lawn and garden work -- activities such a digging, planting and mowing -- can work the heart and other muscles just as effectively as more traditional forms of aerobic exercise, say members of the University of Akron's sport-science and wellness-education department. In some cases, yardwork is even more effective, said Ronald Otterstetter, an assistant professor who specializes in exercise physiology.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2008
It's a Monday evening at True Balance Studio in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood, and a handful of students are hanging out in the loft-style exercise facility. Literally. As in hanging upside down, suspended midair, doing splits and other daring feats. And all while their arms, feet and assorted body parts are intertwined with two long swaths of black, silky fabric, rigged up from the 12- to 15-foot ceiling. A few thin mats are situated underneath. "Pull your abs in, tuck your pelvis," said instructor Mark Harding, encouraging beginning student Lauren Butkiewicz, who's hoisted herself into an aerial seated position, with legs extended and toes pointed.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2013
William C. Stanley, a cardiovascular physiologist who made connections around the world for his research and loved outdoor exercise, died Oct. 21 in Australia of a heart attack. He was 56. Dr. Stanley lived in Baltimore for about six years — working for the University of Maryland School of Medicine — before moving overseas in January to become chair of cardiovascular physiology at the University of Sydney. A California native, he grew up outdoors, often camping and kayaking with his family.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2008
It's a Monday evening at True Balance Studio in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood, and a handful of students are hanging out in the loft-style exercise facility. Literally. As in hanging upside down, suspended midair, doing splits and other daring feats. And all while their arms, feet and assorted body parts are intertwined with two long swaths of black, silky fabric, rigged up from the 12- to 15-foot ceiling. A few thin mats are situated underneath. "Pull your abs in, tuck your pelvis," said instructor Mark Harding, encouraging beginning student Lauren Butkiewicz, who's hoisted herself into an aerial seated position, with legs extended and toes pointed.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
H. Samuel Case, a longtime Western Maryland College professor, has been named provost of the Westminster liberal arts college. A professor of exercise science and physical education who has taught at the college for 35 years, Case has served as acting provost since April. "I'm thrilled and humbled," said Case, 59, who lives in Westminster. His appointment to the college's second-highest administrative office is Joan Develin Coley's first major personnel change since she was elected WMC's president by the board of trustees in October.
NEWS
June 11, 2004
SCOTT SHAFFER, 37, of Aliso Viejo, CA passed away June 5, 2004. He was born on March 17, 1967 in Baltimore, MD. Scott moved to California in 1995 and earned a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology at Chapman University, where he was captain of the lacrosse team, receiving both most valuable player and all star awards. He carried his passion for lacrosse into his teaching and lacrosse coaching career at St. Mary's and All Angels in Aliso Viejo, California in 2002. Throughout his time, both on and off the lacrosse field, he touched many lives with his caring heart and all will fondly remember his wit and sense of humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Kelly L. Rottmund, daughter of Faith and Richard Rottmund, of Parkville MD, and Frank Paul Marinelli, son of Denise and Frank O. Marinelli, of Perry Hall, MD, were married October 30, 2004 in Deep Creek, Maryland Western Maryland. Among family and friends, the ceremony and reception were held on the lake at the beautiful Will 'O the Wisp. The Bride and Groom and Bridal Party rented a large mountain mansion at the top of the mountain for the special event. Given in marriage by her mother and father, the bride was attended by hersister, Corinne Rottmund, as the Maid of Honor, and her bridesmaids, who were life long friends, Jennifer Wright, Wendy Beresh, Nicole Mc Master and April Marinelli, the Grooms sister.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
H. Samuel Case, a longtime Western Maryland College professor, has been named provost of the Westminster liberal arts college. A professor of exercise science and physical education who has taught at the college for 35 years, Case has served as acting provost since April. "I'm thrilled and humbled," said Case, 59, who lives in Westminster. His appointment to the college's second-highest administrative office is Joan Develin Coley's first major personnel change since she was elected WMC's president by the board of trustees in October.
FEATURES
By MARY B. BRECKENRIDGE and MARY B. BRECKENRIDGE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 24, 2006
Fitness can be as close as your own backyard. Who needs gym memberships and Bowflex machines when you have a yard to take care of? Lawn and garden work -- activities such a digging, planting and mowing -- can work the heart and other muscles just as effectively as more traditional forms of aerobic exercise, say members of the University of Akron's sport-science and wellness-education department. In some cases, yardwork is even more effective, said Ronald Otterstetter, an assistant professor who specializes in exercise physiology.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | February 26, 1992
Edward J. Zambraski, chairman of exercise science and sport studies at Rutgers University, says the equine industry devotes just one-halfof 1 percent of its $15 billion economic impact to research on horses."
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | February 24, 1992
The aerobics craze started two decades ago with energetic exercises done to music, and while it's slowed down somewhat, jobs for fitness trainers haven't missed a beat.Aerobics and other exercise programs are big business in health clubs, colleges, universities, dance studios, community centers and park districts.Workout centers provide thousands of jobs for fitness instructors with credentials that range from on-the-job experience and associate degrees from community colleges to four-year diplomas capped with master's and doctorate degrees.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2003
Catherine D. Kohlenstein, a physical therapist who worked with injured veterans and athletes, died of leukemia Monday at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Ellicott City resident was 45. Ms. Kohlenstein was co-owner of a physical therapy practice in Columbia, where she treated clients with an approach that stressed movement and proper posture to relieve pain. Born Catherine Doetzer in Columbus, Ga., she was raised on Montrose Avenue in Catonsville. She was a 1974 graduate of Catonsville High School, where she played lacrosse, soccer and softball on varsity teams.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.