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By Stacey BeattieStacey Beattie and Stacey BeattieStacey Beattie,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 4, 1993
Liz McGinness says she first got serious about exercise nine years ago while pregnant with her first child. She bought a membership in a health club and made a weekly routine of biking, walking and stair-stepping.But after her baby was born, getting herself and her baby ready for the trip to the gym was soon overwhelming."It became a two- or three-hour ordeal," she says. "It wasn't really practical in terms of maintaining a pretty rigid routine."Then she and her husband bought their first exercise machine, a stationary bike, and began working out in their Wichita, Kan., home.
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NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | April 29, 2014
Everybody needs to recharge their batteries once in a while - to get away, slow down, take a few deep breaths. But not everybody wants to do it the same way. Some want to be pampered in luxury. Others would rather wander through wooded trails. Others could think of nothing better than guided spiritual retreat with like-minded pilgrims. Fortunately, you can find any of these options in Howard County, where a variety of facilities offer an array of retreat spacesĀ for the weary, burned-out seeker of solace.
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BUSINESS
By Barry Schiffman and Barry Schiffman,New York Times News Service | November 4, 1990
Marines still do push-ups. Heavyweights jump rope. But these days more and more ordinary Americans are trying to get in shape with elaborate and expensive home exercise equipment. Last year they spent $1.73 billion, triple what they spent in 1980.Exercise machines are the latest stage in the fitness boom, and suitable for an aging, family-minded generation.Richard Miller, owner of Cutler Owens, the Gym Source, says his New York store began as a full-line sporting goods retailer that catered to runners and tennis players in the 1970s.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | September 10, 2007
Wytashe Miller doesn't know the day. Really, the 45-year-old hospital worker can't even recall the month, but this much he does know: At some point this past spring, fluorescent-colored workout machines materialized along the walking path surrounding the reservoir at Druid Hill Park, and he couldn't be happier about it. "One night, they just appeared," said Miller, an Edmondson Village resident. "At least, that's what it seemed like anyway." Others who paused in between exercise sets to talk on a recent midweek's morning about the equipment's arrival shared similar experiences; they had no idea the park would be outfitted with rowing, elliptical, back and leg press machines, but they gladly take advantage of the free workouts.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | December 10, 2004
Home is where the heart is. It's also where you'll increasingly find a gym to work that heart, along with abs, lats and every other body part that can benefit from the lubrication of regular exercise. According to the National Sporting Goods Association, home-gym equipment racked up $4.7 billion in sales in 2003. Treadmills are the runaway favorite purchase, with annual sales topping $2.5 billion. But many people don't stop there. They build fully appointed, and occasionally regal, workout rooms complete with stationary bike, stair climber, rower, multistation exercise machines, free weights, medicine balls, mirrored walls, televisions and more.
FEATURES
By Bill Laitner and Bill Laitner,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 2, 1993
Weight Watchers entrepreneur Florine Mark has free weights and half a dozen fitness machines in the mirrored exercise room she built onto her home."It's not how much it cost, it's how much you use it," she insists.In the rural house of accountant Bruce Correll reside a treadmill, Lifecycle and rowing machine."I don't have any furniture, though," he deadpans.Each shares in the growing preference for sweating in private. Sales of home exercise equipment still are booming, even after a decade of streaking growth.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | April 29, 2014
Everybody needs to recharge their batteries once in a while - to get away, slow down, take a few deep breaths. But not everybody wants to do it the same way. Some want to be pampered in luxury. Others would rather wander through wooded trails. Others could think of nothing better than guided spiritual retreat with like-minded pilgrims. Fortunately, you can find any of these options in Howard County, where a variety of facilities offer an array of retreat spacesĀ for the weary, burned-out seeker of solace.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
The buzz in fitness these days is all about "functional training," which is good news for those looking for low-cost alternatives to workout machines. Definitions tend to be fuzzy, but the idea is that your fitness regimen should mimic the physical stresses of your day-to-day life or sport. It typically involves the whole body. Maybe you've seen that guy at your gym balancing on a wobbly ball while he lifts dumbbells. That's functional training. He's working on his core stabilizing muscles and bodybuilding at the same time.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | September 10, 2007
Wytashe Miller doesn't know the day. Really, the 45-year-old hospital worker can't even recall the month, but this much he does know: At some point this past spring, fluorescent-colored workout machines materialized along the walking path surrounding the reservoir at Druid Hill Park, and he couldn't be happier about it. "One night, they just appeared," said Miller, an Edmondson Village resident. "At least, that's what it seemed like anyway." Others who paused in between exercise sets to talk on a recent midweek's morning about the equipment's arrival shared similar experiences; they had no idea the park would be outfitted with rowing, elliptical, back and leg press machines, but they gladly take advantage of the free workouts.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. - Right away, I had to see them for myself. There was a tiny news story about them in the paper, bottom of Page 2, and after reading it, I screamed: "DORIS, WARM UP THE BUICK! WE'RE HEADED TO ATLANTIC CITY!" somehow overlooking, in all the excitement, that I don't live with anyone named Doris and don't own a Buick, either. But that wasn't important at the time. Getting to the Jersey Shore pronto - that was the important thing. Three hours later, I pulled into the grimy self-parking lot at the Tropicana Hotel, crossed the skywalk and descended into the perpetual hazy twilight of the casino.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
The buzz in fitness these days is all about "functional training," which is good news for those looking for low-cost alternatives to workout machines. Definitions tend to be fuzzy, but the idea is that your fitness regimen should mimic the physical stresses of your day-to-day life or sport. It typically involves the whole body. Maybe you've seen that guy at your gym balancing on a wobbly ball while he lifts dumbbells. That's functional training. He's working on his core stabilizing muscles and bodybuilding at the same time.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | December 10, 2004
Home is where the heart is. It's also where you'll increasingly find a gym to work that heart, along with abs, lats and every other body part that can benefit from the lubrication of regular exercise. According to the National Sporting Goods Association, home-gym equipment racked up $4.7 billion in sales in 2003. Treadmills are the runaway favorite purchase, with annual sales topping $2.5 billion. But many people don't stop there. They build fully appointed, and occasionally regal, workout rooms complete with stationary bike, stair climber, rower, multistation exercise machines, free weights, medicine balls, mirrored walls, televisions and more.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. - Right away, I had to see them for myself. There was a tiny news story about them in the paper, bottom of Page 2, and after reading it, I screamed: "DORIS, WARM UP THE BUICK! WE'RE HEADED TO ATLANTIC CITY!" somehow overlooking, in all the excitement, that I don't live with anyone named Doris and don't own a Buick, either. But that wasn't important at the time. Getting to the Jersey Shore pronto - that was the important thing. Three hours later, I pulled into the grimy self-parking lot at the Tropicana Hotel, crossed the skywalk and descended into the perpetual hazy twilight of the casino.
FEATURES
By Stacey BeattieStacey Beattie and Stacey BeattieStacey Beattie,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 4, 1993
Liz McGinness says she first got serious about exercise nine years ago while pregnant with her first child. She bought a membership in a health club and made a weekly routine of biking, walking and stair-stepping.But after her baby was born, getting herself and her baby ready for the trip to the gym was soon overwhelming."It became a two- or three-hour ordeal," she says. "It wasn't really practical in terms of maintaining a pretty rigid routine."Then she and her husband bought their first exercise machine, a stationary bike, and began working out in their Wichita, Kan., home.
FEATURES
By Bill Laitner and Bill Laitner,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 2, 1993
Weight Watchers entrepreneur Florine Mark has free weights and half a dozen fitness machines in the mirrored exercise room she built onto her home."It's not how much it cost, it's how much you use it," she insists.In the rural house of accountant Bruce Correll reside a treadmill, Lifecycle and rowing machine."I don't have any furniture, though," he deadpans.Each shares in the growing preference for sweating in private. Sales of home exercise equipment still are booming, even after a decade of streaking growth.
BUSINESS
By Barry Schiffman and Barry Schiffman,New York Times News Service | November 4, 1990
Marines still do push-ups. Heavyweights jump rope. But these days more and more ordinary Americans are trying to get in shape with elaborate and expensive home exercise equipment. Last year they spent $1.73 billion, triple what they spent in 1980.Exercise machines are the latest stage in the fitness boom, and suitable for an aging, family-minded generation.Richard Miller, owner of Cutler Owens, the Gym Source, says his New York store began as a full-line sporting goods retailer that catered to runners and tennis players in the 1970s.
NEWS
April 30, 1995
Edgewood Middle School students can now pedal their way to fitness on two Lifecycles, thanks to a donation by Healthy Harford Inc., a newly formed nonprofit Harford County health promotion organization. The two exercise machines, valued at $4,000, were presented to the school as the first activity of a planned pilot program with Harford County public schools.Healthy Harford Inc. was created this year as a coalition of private and not-for-profit businesses and public agencies with the goal of making Harford County the healthiest community in ** Maryland by 2000.
FEATURES
By Janet Cromley | November 8, 2007
There's some new buzz on vibrating exercise platforms. The machines, which are cropping up with increasing frequency in gyms and exercise rooms, are used during workouts. They're based on the theory that vibrating the body like a giant tuning fork will strengthen muscles, increase flexibility and build bone. Some research suggests the machines may provide moderate benefits, but researchers at the Johnson Space Center in Houston have found that the machines also may exceed occupational safety standards for vibrating equipment such as trucks and heavy machinery.
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