Advertisement
HomeCollectionsExemptions
IN THE NEWS

Exemptions

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
Pentagon officials say they will return to Capitol Hill this year to seek legislation exempting the military from key environmental laws. The military will renew arguments that laws protecting the air, endangered species and public health are hurting its ability to train troops for combat. Last year, a skeptical Congress rejected all but one of the nine proposed exemptions. But with Republicans in charge of both houses of Congress and the White House, the Pentagon is expected to have an easier time making its case.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
A Calvert County circuit judge has overturned the Southern Maryland county's decision to exempt the proposed Cove Point liquefied natural gas export facility from local zoning regulations. It's not clear, however, whether the decision affects plans for the $3.4 billion project. Judge James P. Salmon declared that Calvert County acted illegally in freeing Cove Point, now the site of a liquefied natural gas import terminal, from having to comply with the county's zoning ordinance. In doing so, the judge said, county officials violated Maryland's constitution by treating Dominion, the Virginia-based energy company that owns the site, differently from other property owners.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2003
The Carroll commissioners granted for the first time yesterday financial hardship exemptions to the county's yearlong growth freeze, one for a 14-home subdivision near Finksburg and one for a six-home subdivision in Woodbine. Deborah Cooper, owner of the property near Finksburg, told the commissioners she would be unable to pay her grandmother's medical bills without the money she would earn from subdividing 26 acres of her family's farm. Fred Kent, owner of the Woodbine property, said he and his wife would face imminent financial ruin if not allowed to subdivide their 35-acre farm.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
In a particularly naked bit of pandering, Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan appeared before the state Fraternal Order of Police this week as part of its process of determining its endorsement in the fall election and promised to exempt law enforcement officers' pensions from the state income tax. As intuitively appealing as it might seem to help those who have served, it's a bad idea. To his credit, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, the Democratic candidate, appeared before the same groups a day later and said he would not make that promise, preferring to seek comprehensive tax reform that benefits the middle class rather than making promises to every group.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994
The most common problems that slow down the processing of Maryland tax returns, according to the state comptroller's office, are:Rounding, Decimal Points and Commas: All dollar figures should be rounded to the nearest dollar. (50 cents and above to the next higher dollar, 49 cents and below to the next lower.) They should be in blue or black ink without decimal points, commas or dollar signs.Standard Deduction: Maryland's standard deduction is 15 percent of the taxpayer's adjusted gross income, subject to minimum and maximum amounts.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | December 21, 1993
It would be "ludicrous" for the Howard County Council to remove exemptions from a recently enacted smoking ban, tobacco lobbyist Bruce Bereano said last night.The smoking ban takes effect July 1, 1996, allowing time for the General Assembly to enact a state-wide smoking ban. It provides exemptions for restaurant bars that are self-enclosed and have separate ventilation systems, overnight trucks stops and retail tobacco stores.Mr. Bereano told the council at last night's public hearing on a bill to remove the exemptions that he did not want to appear arrogant, but that "at no time will the state legislature ban smoking in bars and taverns."
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2001
I make $145,000 a year and my spouse does not work. We have three children and a sizable mortgage. We're receiving a combined federal and state tax refund of about $12,000 for 2000. I'm not thrilled about making no-interest loans of that size to the government. I'd really like to reduce my withholding, but I've repeatedly been told - always in ominous tones - that going above 10 exemptions means "you have to tell the IRS." I've reached the point where my response is, "So what?" At more than 10 exemptions, do we become prime targets for an audit?
NEWS
June 21, 1994
A legislative committee is asking the Schaefer administration to make several minor changes in proposed regulations that would virtually ban indoor smoking in Maryland except in private homes.The proposed new rules -- which could take effect as early as next month -- would ban smoking in almost all indoor workplaces. While the Administrative, Executive and Legislative Review Committee does not have authority to force changes in the proposal, members asked the occupational safety and health agency yesterday to exempt hotel rooms, vehicles used for work and offices in private homes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1990
The Maryland Anatomy Board has won two exemptions from the state's 6-week-old hiring freeze, allowing it to hire an embalmer and ending a 3-week-old crisis that had forced the cremation of two dozen corpses donated for medical training."
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | February 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A classic legislative turf battle brought stockbrokers, insurance agents and certified public accountants to a Senate committee yesterday to argue for regulation of "the other guy."The fight pitted the three groups not only against one another as each asked to be exempted from state securities regulation, but also against independent financial planners, who called for "a level playing field" -- meaning regulation of everybody.Under existing law, anyone who is an investment adviser must be regulated by the Maryland Securities Division and make certain disclosures to the state.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
After investing $700,000 to renovate a struggling White Marsh motel and restaurant he bought two years ago, Ronald Parker was worried that a battle over the decades-old sign could cost him his business. Parker, a 67-year-old attorney who lives in Harford County, lost a Baltimore County administrative hearing earlier this year after a resident reported that signs at the business, the Williamsburg Inn on U.S. 40, were too large and didn't conform to current county standards. "To me, it's ludicrous," Parker said.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
Columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s Sunday rant about the IRS' alleged targeting of conservative groups ( "Why no outrage over the IRS' tea party targeting?" June 29) raised a basic question in my mind: Why should tea party groups get tax exempt status? The tea party groups are clearly partisan Republican organizations, as reams of news copy dissecting "tea party vs. corporate GOP" primary battles make clear. Certainly some people drawn to these groups are disgusted with the general state of politics and its purveyors, such as Mr. Ehrlich.
HEALTH
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
A network of Catholic employers is temporarily exempt from the federal government's requirement to provide free birth control coverage for workers, a federal court has ruled. The ruling this week by an Oklahoma judge grants a preliminary injunction for some members of the Catholic Benefits Association, an organization of religious employers that owns an insurance company and is led by Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore. The CBA and other Catholic groups filed a class action lawsuit against the federal government in March, asking to be freed from the Affordable Care Act's requirement to provide contraceptive coverage without a co-pay.
NEWS
March 29, 2014
In response to the letter, "Religion no excuse to ignore ACA" (March 26), if the U.S. should treat all entities equally and apply Obamacare as the law was written, then let's abolish all waivers the administration has allowed thus far, including those accorded to some unions and select businesses. After all, those institutions simply didn't want to comply with the law, rather than voice objections on grounds of religious principals as has been done by the Little Sisters of the Poor or Hobby Lobby.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Drama over stormwater fees continues in Anne Arundel County, where a proposal by Del. Steve Schuh to exempt the county from the fees was met with resistance from fellow delegates last week. Schuh's bill would remove Anne Arundel from the list of 10 jurisdictions that are required to collect a fee from property owners to help pay for projects that reduce polluted stormwater runoff that harms the Chesapeake Bay. Schuh, a Gibson Island Republican, voted for the state bill requiring the fees in 2012.
NEWS
January 14, 2014
Does anyone fact-check Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s rants ("De Blasio-ism should strike fear in the hearts of New York," Jan. 12)? I've been looking around online and can find no proof at all for his claim that no tea party-related group had its tax exempt application approved by the IRS between 2010 and 2012. Even Fox News admits that though the groups were flagged for review, they were granted their exemptions. I understand that you have to include voices from all sides of the political spectrum, but you should be sure that any bold claims made under the heading of "fact" are indeed true and verifiable.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1996
A three-year battle over a College Park restaurant property tax bill ended with an appeals court ruling last week that experts say may have enlarged a tax loophole that would cost state and county governments thousands of dollars in lost revenues.The Court of Special Appeals ruled that the 94th Aero Squadron restaurant, on the grounds of the College Park Airport, qualifies as a concession on government-owned land and that its landlord, the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, is excused from paying its $30,000 real estate tax bill.
NEWS
By Nick Anderson and Nick Anderson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - In a show of support for an administration at war, the House overwhelmingly approved a bill yesterday that would grant the Pentagon exemptions to environmental laws, authorize a major overhaul of the civilian defense bureaucracy and lift a decade-old ban on government research into "low-yield" nuclear weapons. The bill, a milestone in Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld's quest to reshape the Pentagon, also drops objections to politically painful military base closures scheduled for two years from now. The House voted 362-40 for the fiscal 2004 defense authorization, reflecting solid bipartisan support for defense programs at a time when U.S. armed forces are engaged in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz hopes to convince state lawmakers to exempt county government vehicles from the state gas tax. Kamenetz announced his legislative agenda this week as the General Assembly convened in Annapolis. His administration says exempting county vehicles from the state tax would save about $1.6 million, with roughly $1 million in savings from county government and the rest from the county schools. Together, the county government and school system spend $19 million a year on fuel, county officials say. State-owned vehicles are exempt from the tax. Also during the session, the county plans to push for the restoration of so-called "highway user funds," which is the portion of state gas tax and motor vehicle fees given to local governments for road projects.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
The Obama administration argued Friday that the Affordable Care Act contains sufficient protections for nonprofits that object to providing health coverage for contraception and urged the Supreme Court to reject an appeal from a Catonsville-based Catholic charity that serves the elderly poor. Nonprofit religious charities already can opt out of the requirement to pay for insurance coverage for contraceptives and therefore have nothing to complain about, U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli wrote in a brief to the nation's highest court.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.