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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 23, 1995
NEW YORK -- A judge yesterday ordered the immediate removal of former butler Bernard Lafferty as executor of the $1.2 billion estate of tobacco heiress Doris Duke.In replacing Mr. Lafferty with a leading New York lawyer, Manhattan Surrogate's Court Judge Eve M. Preminger cited several "classic grounds" for his removal, including waste of assets and "substance abuse." Judge Preminger lambasted the "basically illiterate" former butler for such excesses as crashing Duke's Cadillac, then having the estate provide him with a new one -- along with a chauffeur -- and using estate funds to spruce up her gated Los Angeles estate, Falcon Lair, where he continues to live.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 26, 2014
A Canton condominium owned by Baltimore author Tom Clancy is slated for settlement next month, according to court documents. The Clancy estate is the subject of a legal battle between his widow and the former executor. The 2,379-square-foot unit in the Canton Cove building on Boston Street came under contract for $660,000 in September.  The court approved a petition to sell the property Sept. 17, a day after attorneys for J.W. Thompson Webb sought permission for the deal.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | November 17, 1996
Dear Mr. Gisriel:I'm in the process of having my will prepared. One of the questions I face concerns who should be the executor of my estate. Please give me an explanation of what the duties are, etc.Richard RobersonCatonsvilleDear Mr. Roberson:One of the most important and sometimes agonizing decisions you can make in the preparation of your will is the choice of a personal representative.The executor you name must combine the tact of a diplomat with the administrative skills of a professional executive.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
Calman A. Levin, who founded a law firm and represented the estate of writer Gertrude Stein, died Thursday of a heart attack at his Village of Cross Keys home. He was 73. In 1958, along with partners Stanford G. Gann Sr. and Robert M. Hankin, he founded the firm of Levin, Gann and Hankin, later Levin & Gann. He practiced in the tower of the former Maryland National Bank Building at Baltimore and Light streets. Mr. Levin specialized in estate planning and administration and remained active in the practice until his death.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 10, 1993
Your long lost uncle has died, making you beneficiary of his life insurance policy.Before rushing to spend that inheritance, it may be wise to check with the Internal Revenue Service.Consider this tale of woe:Two brothers received the proceeds from their father's life insurance policy. The money came directly from the insurer and did not pass through the executor, though it was part of the taxable estate.Years later, the IRS called with bad news. No tax was ever paid on the father's estate, and the brothers would have to pay.The case eventually found its way into Tax Court, where the IRS won.Because the insurance money was part of the father's estate, the sons could, indeed, be held liable for the entire estate tax due, up to the limit described.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 26, 2014
A Canton condominium owned by Baltimore author Tom Clancy is slated for settlement next month, according to court documents. The Clancy estate is the subject of a legal battle between his widow and the former executor. The 2,379-square-foot unit in the Canton Cove building on Boston Street came under contract for $660,000 in September.  The court approved a petition to sell the property Sept. 17, a day after attorneys for J.W. Thompson Webb sought permission for the deal.
NEWS
By Barbara Varro and Barbara Varro,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
Every so often, you hear of someone who inherits a windfall from an elderly person without children or relatives who had relied on the kindness of neighbors for help. Those who reap such rewards are usually surprised that the individual left them money or a family heirloom. But such an act undoubtedly was well planned: He or she had made specific bequests in a will or trust. There are plenty of people out there with no immediate heirs, especially today, with the soaring rate of divorce, smaller family sizes and increasing number of unmarried men and women.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | August 18, 1991
This probably isn't going to happen but, just for fun, let's say someone wants to write the story of your life. A biography, in other words. Now let's also say that you are dead when this biographer comes around looking for a way to resurrect who you were, how you lived and what you thought.But since you are not available -- remember, you are dead -- the biographer will have to rely on other sources for the book's material: family, ex-spouses, friends, enemies, relatives not named in your will, every schoolteacher you ever had, classmates who knew you 40 years ago, bosses who liked you and bosses who didn't . . . well, you get the picture.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
Calman A. Levin, who founded a law firm and represented the estate of writer Gertrude Stein, died Thursday of a heart attack at his Village of Cross Keys home. He was 73. In 1958, along with partners Stanford G. Gann Sr. and Robert M. Hankin, he founded the firm of Levin, Gann and Hankin, later Levin & Gann. He practiced in the tower of the former Maryland National Bank Building at Baltimore and Light streets. Mr. Levin specialized in estate planning and administration and remained active in the practice until his death.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2001
My wife's mother passed away three years ago, leaving an estate of about $1.5 million and naming her son as executor. To date my brother-in-law has done little to settle this estate. In the interest of family harmony, my wife does not want to take legal action to have him removed as executor. I have pointed out that since he hasn't filed an estate tax return, taxes, penalties and interest are accruing and eroding the estate's value. Do you have any suggestions? Your brother-in-law's inaction, and your wife's unwillingness to confront him, have cost the estate plenty.
NEWS
By Barbara Varro and Barbara Varro,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
Every so often, you hear of someone who inherits a windfall from an elderly person without children or relatives who had relied on the kindness of neighbors for help. Those who reap such rewards are usually surprised that the individual left them money or a family heirloom. But such an act undoubtedly was well planned: He or she had made specific bequests in a will or trust. There are plenty of people out there with no immediate heirs, especially today, with the soaring rate of divorce, smaller family sizes and increasing number of unmarried men and women.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2001
My wife's mother passed away three years ago, leaving an estate of about $1.5 million and naming her son as executor. To date my brother-in-law has done little to settle this estate. In the interest of family harmony, my wife does not want to take legal action to have him removed as executor. I have pointed out that since he hasn't filed an estate tax return, taxes, penalties and interest are accruing and eroding the estate's value. Do you have any suggestions? Your brother-in-law's inaction, and your wife's unwillingness to confront him, have cost the estate plenty.
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | November 17, 1996
Dear Mr. Gisriel:I'm in the process of having my will prepared. One of the questions I face concerns who should be the executor of my estate. Please give me an explanation of what the duties are, etc.Richard RobersonCatonsvilleDear Mr. Roberson:One of the most important and sometimes agonizing decisions you can make in the preparation of your will is the choice of a personal representative.The executor you name must combine the tact of a diplomat with the administrative skills of a professional executive.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 23, 1995
NEW YORK -- A judge yesterday ordered the immediate removal of former butler Bernard Lafferty as executor of the $1.2 billion estate of tobacco heiress Doris Duke.In replacing Mr. Lafferty with a leading New York lawyer, Manhattan Surrogate's Court Judge Eve M. Preminger cited several "classic grounds" for his removal, including waste of assets and "substance abuse." Judge Preminger lambasted the "basically illiterate" former butler for such excesses as crashing Duke's Cadillac, then having the estate provide him with a new one -- along with a chauffeur -- and using estate funds to spruce up her gated Los Angeles estate, Falcon Lair, where he continues to live.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 10, 1993
Your long lost uncle has died, making you beneficiary of his life insurance policy.Before rushing to spend that inheritance, it may be wise to check with the Internal Revenue Service.Consider this tale of woe:Two brothers received the proceeds from their father's life insurance policy. The money came directly from the insurer and did not pass through the executor, though it was part of the taxable estate.Years later, the IRS called with bad news. No tax was ever paid on the father's estate, and the brothers would have to pay.The case eventually found its way into Tax Court, where the IRS won.Because the insurance money was part of the father's estate, the sons could, indeed, be held liable for the entire estate tax due, up to the limit described.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | August 18, 1991
This probably isn't going to happen but, just for fun, let's say someone wants to write the story of your life. A biography, in other words. Now let's also say that you are dead when this biographer comes around looking for a way to resurrect who you were, how you lived and what you thought.But since you are not available -- remember, you are dead -- the biographer will have to rely on other sources for the book's material: family, ex-spouses, friends, enemies, relatives not named in your will, every schoolteacher you ever had, classmates who knew you 40 years ago, bosses who liked you and bosses who didn't . . . well, you get the picture.
FEATURES
By Dennis McDougal and Dennis McDougal,Los Angeles Times | April 2, 1991
HOLLYWOOD Tears will flow, hearts will rend and noses will sniffle all over America tonight as CBS airs the made-for-TV movie "Triumph of the Heart: The Ricky Bell Story."The title notwithstanding, it will only be a small, somewhat fictive slice of the real Ricky Bell story. (It will be on Channel 11-WBAL at 9 p.m.)"We weren't doing the complete Ricky Bell story," said screenwriter Jeff Andrus, who spent a month last year researching the former USC football hero's life and tragic early death.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 15, 1994
NEW YORK -- The Lubavitch grand rabbi, Menachem Mendel Schneerson, designated no successor in a brief will that bequeathed a modest estate consisting of books, manuscripts, artwork and household effects to Agudas Chassidei Chabad, a Lubavitch umbrella group that oversees the religious group's worldwide activities.The 22-member council was the sole beneficiary named in the two-page document that was dated Feb. 14, 1988, and filed at Surrogate's Court in Brooklyn late Monday, two days after Rabbi Schneerson died.
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