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By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
Robert L. Oatman does executive protection - and no, he isn't a beefy, brainless bodyguard. He is a fit, trim and congenial figure who likes to wear crisp suits and who works with his team to draw up complex plans for shielding people they're paid to protect. It's a point of professional pride that none of his clients have ever been attacked on his watch over the past 20 years. "If you've got to touch your gun, it means you've made a mistake," said Oatman, 62, whose R.L. Oatman & Associates Inc. is based in Towson.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
The Anne Arundel County Police Department should disband the executive protection unit that became entangled in the scandal that landed former County Executive John R. Leopold in jail, a task force recommended Monday. The county should create a unit with special officers who would report to the county executive, separate from the county force, the panel said. Such a move would ensure officers don't get entangled in the kinds of activities that led to Leopold's January conviction on charges of misconduct in office, while creating a professional protection service similar to the governor's.
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NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1997
For years, Robert L. Oatman has helped to protect public officials and business executives from organized terrorism.Now, Oatman, a former Baltimore County chief of detectives whose Towson-based security agency has a worldwide clientele, is working against new threats to his clients: disgruntled employees and random acts of violence."
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 30, 2013
Those who criticize the John Leopold case - that it was "too much squeeze for too little juice," a waste of taxpayer money - should read the 40-page memorandum by Dennis M. Sweeney, the judge who presided over the Anne Arundel County executive's trial. It is a superb document that navigates through foggy territory - how and when an elected official deploys the police officers provided by taxpayers for his protection - and draws a clear line between the criminal and the just creepy, between use and abuse.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Baltimore police are requesting about $2,000 to send an officer to California to provide security for Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on her family vacation next week. Officer Kyle E. Gooden, who is on the mayor's executive protection team, is requesting the Board of Estimates reimburse him about $1,900 for his expenses on the Aug. 20-26 trip to San Diego, Calif. The department is also asking for about $150 to cover the cost of a rental vehicle. The spending panel is expected to approve the expense Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Robert A. Erlandson | December 4, 1990
A disgruntled employee at the Maryland branch of an international company finally worked up his resentment to the point recently that he threatened to kill his manager.Worried executives called Robert L. Oatman, a former Baltimore County chief of detectives who is now an international security specialist. His team assessed the situation, and concluded the threat was genuine and should be dealt with immediately, before tragedy had a chance to strike.The employee was fired, with the specialists on hand to support the company's security staff.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
The names of the Secret Service detail guarding President Bush's daughter Barbara. The number of agents providing protection to former President George H.W. Bush. The cover name the FBI director's wife uses so she can travel incognito. The arrangements for top National Security Agency officials to avoid airport screening. Cell phone numbers of security officials. These and many other usually secret security details of federal, state and local executive protection activities are contained in hundreds of pages of documents released this month by Gary W. McLhinney, chief of the Maryland Transportation Authority Police.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
An Anne Arundel County police corporal told a judge Tuesday that County Executive John R. Leopold told him to watch a cash box at a political fundraiser, to plant campaign signs for him, and to compile a dossier on his 2010 challenger. Cpl. Howard Brown, a former member of Leopold's taxpayer-funded executive protection detail, also described driving Leopold weekly to the parking lot of an Annapolis bowling alley to meet a county employee. After one such meeting, Brown said, Leopold emerged to describe having had a sexual encounter that he rated highly.
NEWS
June 19, 2012
MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakesays the City Council is putting Baltimore residents at risk from increased crime, among other calamities, because of its preliminary decision to cut about $6 million from her $2.3 billion budget proposal. She has called the effort, led by Council PresidentBernard C. "Jack" Young, to divert some money into increased funding for recreation centers, youth employment and after school programs "unadvisable, unworkable and irresponsible. " Indeed, there is an opportunity cost associated with many of the council's proposed cuts - if not so dire a consequence as the mayor predicts.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Public records show that employees of Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold improperly accessed databases to gather information on at least three people on an "enemies" list, the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland said Tuesday. One of the so-called enemies was Lewis Bracy, a recently retired National Security Agency police officer and community activist who has not previously been associated with Leopold's alleged dossiers, according to the ACLU, which obtained the records through a public information request to the state.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 26, 2013
Friday afternoon in a spacious Annapolis courtroom with a flat-screen monitor, Dr. Roy E. Bands Jr., board-certified orthopedic surgeon, presented a side view of John Leopold's lumbar region - how his lower spine, abdomen and bladder looked in January 2010. Too bad the doctor didn't have a scan of the Anne Arundel County executive's prefrontal cortex. And too bad technology does not exist to tell us what Leopold was thinking when he treated his staff - mostly the police officers assigned to protect him - like a bunch of stooges and lackeys.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
An Anne Arundel County police corporal told a judge Tuesday that County Executive John R. Leopold told him to watch a cash box at a political fundraiser, to plant campaign signs for him, and to compile a dossier on his 2010 challenger. Cpl. Howard Brown, a former member of Leopold's taxpayer-funded executive protection detail, also described driving Leopold weekly to the parking lot of an Annapolis bowling alley to meet a county employee. After one such meeting, Brown said, Leopold emerged to describe having had a sexual encounter that he rated highly.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Baltimore police are requesting about $2,000 to send an officer to California to provide security for Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on her family vacation next week. Officer Kyle E. Gooden, who is on the mayor's executive protection team, is requesting the Board of Estimates reimburse him about $1,900 for his expenses on the Aug. 20-26 trip to San Diego, Calif. The department is also asking for about $150 to cover the cost of a rental vehicle. The spending panel is expected to approve the expense Wednesday.
NEWS
July 15, 2012
A judge's decision this week that the trial against Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold can go forward, and the subsequent announcement by embattled Police Chief James W. Teare that he will retire, offer hope that the cloud that has been hanging over the county may soon be lifted. Judge Dennis Sweeney's rejection of Mr. Leopold's motion to dismiss the charges against him gets us no closer to an accounting of whether the conduct he is accused of is criminal or merely reprehensible - or whether he in fact did the things listed in his indictment at all. And Mr. Teare's resignation erases all doubt, if any remained, about whether he would answer the County Council's questions about what he knew and when about Mr. Leopold's alleged misuse of the police officers assigned to his executive protection detail.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 11, 2012
The last time I saw John Leopold, the Anne Arundel County executive who has been charged with using his taxpayer-funded police security detail for, uh, personal stuff, he was standing in a buffet line at opening night of the Maryland Live Casino in June. He was by himself, sans entourage, and he had a small, white plate in his hand. He appeared to be waiting, just like everyone else, for a slice of carved meat. He didn't seem to be expecting special treatment, and at no time did the county executive attempt to schmooze his way to the front of the line.
NEWS
June 19, 2012
MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakesays the City Council is putting Baltimore residents at risk from increased crime, among other calamities, because of its preliminary decision to cut about $6 million from her $2.3 billion budget proposal. She has called the effort, led by Council PresidentBernard C. "Jack" Young, to divert some money into increased funding for recreation centers, youth employment and after school programs "unadvisable, unworkable and irresponsible. " Indeed, there is an opportunity cost associated with many of the council's proposed cuts - if not so dire a consequence as the mayor predicts.
NEWS
April 4, 2012
We are far from learning all the facts about Anne Arundel County Police Chief Col. James E. Teare Sr.'s involvement, if any, in the alleged misconduct described in the indictment against County Executive John Leopold. But we do know enough to have serious questions about what he knew and when, and to worry about the effective leadership of the department while those questions remain unanswered. In light of Mr. Teare's refusal to answer substantive questions about the matter, and the evident dysfunction in county law enforcement, the chief needs to take a leave of absence until this case is resolved.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 11, 2012
The last time I saw John Leopold, the Anne Arundel County executive who has been charged with using his taxpayer-funded police security detail for, uh, personal stuff, he was standing in a buffet line at opening night of the Maryland Live Casino in June. He was by himself, sans entourage, and he had a small, white plate in his hand. He appeared to be waiting, just like everyone else, for a slice of carved meat. He didn't seem to be expecting special treatment, and at no time did the county executive attempt to schmooze his way to the front of the line.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Public records show that employees of Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold improperly accessed databases to gather information on at least three people on an "enemies" list, the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland said Tuesday. One of the so-called enemies was Lewis Bracy, a recently retired National Security Agency police officer and community activist who has not previously been associated with Leopold's alleged dossiers, according to the ACLU, which obtained the records through a public information request to the state.
NEWS
April 4, 2012
We are far from learning all the facts about Anne Arundel County Police Chief Col. James E. Teare Sr.'s involvement, if any, in the alleged misconduct described in the indictment against County Executive John Leopold. But we do know enough to have serious questions about what he knew and when, and to worry about the effective leadership of the department while those questions remain unanswered. In light of Mr. Teare's refusal to answer substantive questions about the matter, and the evident dysfunction in county law enforcement, the chief needs to take a leave of absence until this case is resolved.
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