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By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. is facing tough questions from Congress about his views on executive power, amid an intensifying debate over whether President Bush had the authority to order domestic eavesdropping by the National Security Agency. Alito's support for letting top officials authorize spying without warrants inside the United States, detailed in documents released last week, has become a focus for critics who warn that he would be overly deferential to the executive branch in cases involving the separation of powers.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 9, 2014
As President Barack Obama contemplates November's congressional elections, the odds are they may produce Republican majorities in both the House and Senate. That would likely mean more of the same legislative frustration that has met his presidency to date. Forewarned by his first term, the president during his second has been relying more on his executive powers to advance his own key objectives. He has told ranking White House aides to explore ways to move parts of his own agenda without recourse to Congress.
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NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | July 4, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- I can't think of any better gift to the nation on Independence Day than the Supreme Court ruling last week that checked President Bush's expanding claims of executive power. The Fourth of July should remind us how blessed we are to live under the rule of law. Most Americans take that blessing for granted and fail to understand how rare is the legacy bequeathed by the Founding Fathers. A 5-3 majority on the court gave us a wake-up call. The case, Hamdan vs. Rumsfeld, was technically about whether Osama bin Laden's former chauffeur, a Yemeni named Salim Ahmed Hamdan, who is imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay, could be tried by military commission - a system established by Mr. Bush.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
President Barack Obama has come under fire from Hispanic groups who say he hasn't done enough to enact comprehensive immigration reform and that his administration has deported record numbers of undocumented immigrants. Neither charge is wholly justified: Mr. Obama's pleas to House Republican leaders to take up an immigration bill passed by the Senate last year have been met with stony indifference, and though the total number of deportations on his watch has been higher than under previous presidents, they have been declining rapidly in recent years.
NEWS
By Stephen J. Schulhofer | July 3, 2003
IN TIMES of war, can the president imprison someone indefinitely, with no access to the courts or to anyone in the outside world? That's the power that the Bush administration has claimed once again. Its actions have drawn scant attention or protest. Yet they lie far outside the accepted bounds of constitutional democracy, by our own traditions and the contemporary standards of all other Western nations. Ali Saleh Kahlah al-Marri, a student in Peoria, Ill., was being held for trial on charges of lying to the FBI, but the Bush administration declared him an "enemy combatant" June 23 and transferred him to a Navy brig in South Carolina.
NEWS
By Michael B. Runnels | April 9, 2014
Responding to the Obama Administration's decision to delay enforcement of certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a number of politicians and commentators have argued that the president is running roughshod over the U.S. Constitution. To this point, constitutional law professor Jonathan Turley recently argued that such actions are presenting a "troubling mosaic" of executive power, and that "there will come a day when people step back and see the entire mosaic for what it truly represents: a new system with a dominant president with both legislative and executive powers.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 9, 2014
As President Barack Obama contemplates November's congressional elections, the odds are they may produce Republican majorities in both the House and Senate. That would likely mean more of the same legislative frustration that has met his presidency to date. Forewarned by his first term, the president during his second has been relying more on his executive powers to advance his own key objectives. He has told ranking White House aides to explore ways to move parts of his own agenda without recourse to Congress.
NEWS
By Robyn Blumner | August 13, 2007
It was a matinee crowd. This was apparent by all the gray heads around, for those lucky enough to still have hair. And then there was that 10 minutes of disruption at the show's beginning when stragglers were seated and the hard of hearing yelled to their companions, "Is this the right seat?" as the remainder of the audience shushed them loudly. So began the trip back to 1977, the year that British talk show host David Frost snagged 20 hours of interviews with disgraced President Richard M. Nixon.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | May 28, 2013
May has been a rough month for President Barack Obama: more Benghazi developments, plus the breaking IRS and journo-bugging scandals. Taken separately, none of these episodes is fatal. They do not reach Watergate levels. Given that previously classified Benghazi emails were doctored by Republicans, and that even former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates confirms it would have been impossible and ill-advised to dispatch fighter planes to the consulate, clearly there's more smoke than fire in Benghazi.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
While Gov. Martin O'Malley has the authority to release a convict serving a life sentence, he has never used it. Now, lawmakers are considering whether to take it away from him. The House of Delegates has approved legislation that would free a lifer on the recommendation of the state parole commission if the governor does not file an objection. A Senate committee is expected to vote this week on legislation that would remove him from the process altogether. The efforts are being led by O'Malley's fellow Democrats, some of whom are exasperated by his inaction on the 50 cases now sitting on his desk.
NEWS
By Michael B. Runnels | April 9, 2014
Responding to the Obama Administration's decision to delay enforcement of certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a number of politicians and commentators have argued that the president is running roughshod over the U.S. Constitution. To this point, constitutional law professor Jonathan Turley recently argued that such actions are presenting a "troubling mosaic" of executive power, and that "there will come a day when people step back and see the entire mosaic for what it truly represents: a new system with a dominant president with both legislative and executive powers.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | May 28, 2013
May has been a rough month for President Barack Obama: more Benghazi developments, plus the breaking IRS and journo-bugging scandals. Taken separately, none of these episodes is fatal. They do not reach Watergate levels. Given that previously classified Benghazi emails were doctored by Republicans, and that even former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates confirms it would have been impossible and ill-advised to dispatch fighter planes to the consulate, clearly there's more smoke than fire in Benghazi.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
While Gov. Martin O'Malley has the authority to release a convict serving a life sentence, he has never used it. Now, lawmakers are considering whether to take it away from him. The House of Delegates has approved legislation that would free a lifer on the recommendation of the state parole commission if the governor does not file an objection. A Senate committee is expected to vote this week on legislation that would remove him from the process altogether. The efforts are being led by O'Malley's fellow Democrats, some of whom are exasperated by his inaction on the 50 cases now sitting on his desk.
NEWS
By Robyn Blumner | August 13, 2007
It was a matinee crowd. This was apparent by all the gray heads around, for those lucky enough to still have hair. And then there was that 10 minutes of disruption at the show's beginning when stragglers were seated and the hard of hearing yelled to their companions, "Is this the right seat?" as the remainder of the audience shushed them loudly. So began the trip back to 1977, the year that British talk show host David Frost snagged 20 hours of interviews with disgraced President Richard M. Nixon.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | July 4, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- I can't think of any better gift to the nation on Independence Day than the Supreme Court ruling last week that checked President Bush's expanding claims of executive power. The Fourth of July should remind us how blessed we are to live under the rule of law. Most Americans take that blessing for granted and fail to understand how rare is the legacy bequeathed by the Founding Fathers. A 5-3 majority on the court gave us a wake-up call. The case, Hamdan vs. Rumsfeld, was technically about whether Osama bin Laden's former chauffeur, a Yemeni named Salim Ahmed Hamdan, who is imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay, could be tried by military commission - a system established by Mr. Bush.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | December 28, 2005
CHICAGO -- President Bush is a bundle of paradoxes. He thinks the scope of the federal government should be limited but the powers of the president should not. He wants judges to interpret the Constitution as the framers did but doesn't think he should be constrained by the framers' intentions. He attacked Al Gore for trusting government instead of the people, but he insists anyone who wants to defeat terrorism must put absolute faith in the man at the helm of government. His conservative allies say Mr. Bush is acting to uphold the essential prerogatives of his office.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | December 28, 2005
CHICAGO -- President Bush is a bundle of paradoxes. He thinks the scope of the federal government should be limited but the powers of the president should not. He wants judges to interpret the Constitution as the framers did but doesn't think he should be constrained by the framers' intentions. He attacked Al Gore for trusting government instead of the people, but he insists anyone who wants to defeat terrorism must put absolute faith in the man at the helm of government. His conservative allies say Mr. Bush is acting to uphold the essential prerogatives of his office.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - As a Supreme Court justice, John G. Roberts Jr. would help define the limits of presidential power to conduct the war on terrorism. And he is more likely than the woman he seeks to replace to write those definitions broadly, legal scholars and former administration officials say. Justice Sandra Day O'Connor played a pivotal role on social issues such as abortion and religion, which have dominated speculation about the direction the court...
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. is facing tough questions from Congress about his views on executive power, amid an intensifying debate over whether President Bush had the authority to order domestic eavesdropping by the National Security Agency. Alito's support for letting top officials authorize spying without warrants inside the United States, detailed in documents released last week, has become a focus for critics who warn that he would be overly deferential to the executive branch in cases involving the separation of powers.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - As a Supreme Court justice, John G. Roberts Jr. would help define the limits of presidential power to conduct the war on terrorism. And he is more likely than the woman he seeks to replace to write those definitions broadly, legal scholars and former administration officials say. Justice Sandra Day O'Connor played a pivotal role on social issues such as abortion and religion, which have dominated speculation about the direction the court...
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